German Expressionism Essays & Research Papers

Best German Expressionism Essays

  • German Expressionism - 1036 Words
    German expressionism German Expressionist Films pushed German films back onto cinema screens in Europe and America because of their artistic value. Expressionism is a manner of painting, drawing, sculpting in which forms derived from nature are distorted or exaggerated and colors are intensified for emotive or expressive purposes. In 1914, the Great War began in Europe. Germany was cut off from its supply of international cinema.” The only films imported into Germany during the war years...
    1,036 Words | 3 Pages
  • German Expressionism - 306 Words
    German Expressionism: “Nosferatu” vs. “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” German expressionism is a movement that started post World War 1, and before the Second World War. It used a unique technique of shadowing and distinctive camera angles. The films during the movement told stories that mimicked the forbidding reality of the German’s life. For example, in “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,” the set design was painted to get the specific diagonals and claustrophobic atmosphere. Throughout the film,...
    306 Words | 1 Page
  • German Expressionism - 861 Words
    After World War I, an artistic movement began in Germany called the Weimar Cinema, or later called German Expressionism. The movement is most often credited with introducing a new style of film in which dark, dramatic lighting and abstract set design were used to convey emotion. Films included an antagonist who was usually depicted as an iconoclast and their actions often resulted in pandemonium and terror. Out of German Expressionism came Film Noir, a coined phrase used to describe dark and...
    861 Words | 3 Pages
  • German Expressionism - 363 Words
    During 1919, Expressionist films began to emerge and explore the use of various film style and film form techniques. One of the main styles which defined German Expressionist films was the manipulation of mis-en-scene; this included creating twisted and distorted sets, actors using strange and dance-like movements and costumes and appearances tending to be over-exaggerated and outrageous (Horak, 2010, Moran, 2010, Read, 2010, Thompson and Bordwell, 2008). During this time, the culture of German...
    363 Words | 1 Page
  • All German Expressionism Essays

  • German Expressionism - 700 Words
    14 October 2012 Graphic Design Paper German Expressionism The Expressionism movement started in Germany in 1905 before World War 1 and ended in the late 1930s. Expressionism peaked in 1923. By the end of 1923, politically motivated attacks against modern art had begun, and Expressionist cinema began. Expressionist cinema was showed that cinema could also be an art form, and not just entertainment. Under the influence of German Expressionism artists, Germany became the most innovative...
    700 Words | 2 Pages
  • German Expressionism & Soviet Montage
    Before World War I, the cinema was largely an international affair. The war, however, disrupted the free flow of films across borders. Domestic production rose in countries like Germany and Russia. Cinema became largely influenced by the prominence of fine arts (e.g. painting) movements, referred to collectively as Avant-garde. Avant-grade contained styles that rejected the realistic depiction of a concrete world, movements such as German Expressionism and Soviet Montage. German...
    735 Words | 3 Pages
  • German Expressionism and Nosferatu - 669 Words
    The film “Nosferatu” is a horror story about a vampire and its relationship with a young couple. The film is a product of German expressionism and uses misshapen views of reality, symbolism, eroticism and shadows to enhance the dark mood of the film. German expressionists, through certain patterns and styles, sought to show that reality could be seen through emotion. Their intent was to arouse feelings in their audience, for example through the use of vibrant colors and shapes or distortion....
    669 Words | 2 Pages
  • German Expressionism Through Film
    Marcus Kulab Johnson GRM 410 Dr. Harald Menz German Expressionism and Early Cinema German expressionism is one of the most fundamental movements of early cinema. With its basic foundation stemming from the creation of the Universum Film AG in 1917 by the German government, expressionism found a happy home in Germany until, arguably the late 1920s (Wolf). Expressionism changed the canvas of cinema with its technical innovations as well as its impact on Hollywood, not only with its borrowing...
    1,763 Words | 5 Pages
  • German Expressionism Film - 2242 Words
    German Expressionism is seen as the Weimar period in Germany where films have been produced. However, the question is to whether the Weimar period can be seen as expressionistic in terms of style or whether only certain films are considered to be this. Throughout this essay, I will discuss the constant argument as to whether Weimar cinema is considered to have an expressionistic style or whether this is a myth created by the works and analysis of Lotte Eisner and Siegfried Kraucauer. During the...
    2,242 Words | 6 Pages
  • German Expressionism and Tim Burton
    German Expressionism and Tim Burton Tim Burton's films have often been noted as modern day forms of German expressionism (the creative movement in Germany before World War I). It is through such things as sets, themes, makeup and costuming, lighting and shadows, acting techniques, and character that we can see Burton has been widely influenced by films of the era. The notable director's films Edward Scissorhands (1990), Nightmare Before Christmas (1993), Batman (1989) and Batman Returns (1992),...
    2,029 Words | 7 Pages
  • Expressionism - 3480 Words
    Rehab Shaban Ismail Professor Maged Rushdie Modern Drama 2 January 2013 Expressionism in The Hairy Ape by Eugene O'Neill Expressionism arose in Germany and spread through Europe and the world between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The movement was a deliberate departure from the realistic modes of European art. It advocated a purely subjective perspective, distorting objective features of the outer world to portray a troubled personal vision. European painters...
    3,480 Words | 10 Pages
  • Comparative Essay: Edward Scissor Hands and Metropolis on German Expressionism
    Germal expressionist films matched the visuals in terms of darkness and disillusionment. Often somre in mood and featuring characters from a corrupt world, the films dramatic effects produced motifs of claustrophobia and paranoia. Expressioism is the movement in the fine arts that emphasized the expression of one’s inner self and their angst that soley beng realistic and fanboying about the world and lie. Features typical of the expressionist style Special features, narrative elements,...
    1,733 Words | 5 Pages
  • Machinal And Expressionism - 778 Words
    Djordje Janicijevic Sophie Treadwell’s play, ​ Machinal ​ is an expressionistic play written in 1928, depicting a life of young woman who can not adapt with people and environment around her. Expressionism, is an artistic style that originated in Germany at the end of the 19th century in which the artist aims to depict subjective perspective of the character through distortion and exaggeration of reality. Expressionist plays often amplify the inner awakening and suffering of ...
    778 Words | 2 Pages
  • Expressionism And Master Harold And The - 2220 Words
    Aimee Le Roi Thar 1 Paper #2­Directing Concept Expressionism and “Master Harold”...and the boys “Master Harold”...and the boys deals quite a bit with the stark differences between the world Hally lives and the world Willie and Sam live in; and in greater terms the play is quite the social commentary on the inequality that South Africa was experiencing during apartheid between the whites and the blacks. Expressionism seemed like a rather obvious way to do so; it could be used ...
    2,220 Words | 2 Pages
  • Expressionism in Death of Salesman - 2364 Words
    The Expressionistic Devices in Death of a Salesman Musical Motifs From the opening flute notes to their final reprise, Miller's musical themes express the competing influences in Willy Loman's mind. Once established, the themes need only be sounded to evoke certain time frames, emotions, and values. The first sounds of the drama, the flute notes "small and fine," represent the grass, trees, and horizon - objects of Willy's (and Biff's) longing that are tellingly absent from the...
    2,364 Words | 6 Pages
  • Early German Cinema - 4571 Words
    How important was Weimar Cinema to the Development of the German Film Industry? The cinema of the early 20th century saw a vast rise in popularity of the film industry across the world and especially so in Germany after the early development of moving pictures had surfaced at the very end of the 19th century. One of the most significant influences in the film industry was of course the advancement of technology. The reason for this is that Thomas Edison invented his “Kinetoscope” in 1891...
    4,571 Words | 12 Pages
  • Metropolis - 468 Words
    Metropolis The technique combined miniature sets and live actors which allowed the miniature sets to be turned into full scale shots through the use of mirrors. Lang wanted to insert actors into the shots of the skyscrapers and other scenes so Schufftan had to develop a method that would allow him to do so. A plate of glass was placed in front of the camera lens, Schufftan then used the camera’s viewfinder to trace an outline of the area where they desired to place the actors. German...
    468 Words | 2 Pages
  • Expressions in Horror: Dr. Caligari and Nosferatu
    Two of the earliest examples of German Expressionism in film, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and Nosferatu are classics remembered as some of the best horror films of all time. These two films, directed by Robert Wiene and F.W. Murnau respectively, share several key aspects in common, while still retaining their own uniqueness that has left people debating which film is paramount, even nearly a century after their releases. This paper will examine these similarities and differences, and will seek...
    870 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari - 2651 Words
     The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari In this essay, I will firstly provide a brief definition of German Expression in Cinema. Secondly, I will provide a brief explanation of how German Expression is applied to The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. I will then provide an analysis of three key scenes in the light of Hake’s observation. The analysis will exemplify my argument that the Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is an external world where the internal political conflicts and ambivalences of the artists and society...
    2,651 Words | 7 Pages
  • Critique of the Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
    Critique Of The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari Tamala Garrett English 376 Due 1/29/96 The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari was written by Hans Janowitz and Carl Mayer, and directed by Robert Weine. It was produced in 1919 by Erich Pommer for Decla-Bioscop. 1919 was a year in which the movie industry was transformed into a giant industry. Although the movie was produced in 1919, it was not released in the United States until 1921. A time when film makers were out to prove that film was...
    495 Words | 2 Pages
  • world cinema - 949 Words
    In the early 1900s Italy was the first to start a new advangarde movement in the cinema production, thanks to the art movement Futurism. The Manifesto of Futuristic Cinematography dates back to as early as 1916 some sources even started earlier. To the futurists, the cinema was an ideal form of art for their "wonderful plays", being the start of a new artistic medium. As film had with no past and able to be manipulated by editing and simple special effects it became a new creative and...
    949 Words | 3 Pages
  • To What Extent Does the Mise-En-Scene in ‘Night of the Hunter’ Reinforce an Understanding of the Film's Mood, Character and Narrative Themes?
    To what extent does the Mise-en-Scene in ‘Night of the Hunter’ reinforce an understanding of the film's mood, character and narrative themes? The term Mise-en-Scene is used to signify the director’s control over what happens in the film frame. In English the phrase literally translates to “putting in the scene” (Bordwell, 2010a). ‘Night of the Hunter’ (Charles Laughton, 1955) is a prime example of a film that uses aspects of Mise-en-Scene to sway the audience’s opinions of characters and...
    1,162 Words | 4 Pages
  • Visual Narrative Analysis Essay
    History of GERMAN EXPRESSIONISM German Expressionism emerged in the 1910s and had a outstanding impact on painting, film, theatre and sculpture as well. It was a revolt against the established Impressionist style, which centered on the artist’s interpretation of the subject. Instead, Expressionism was based in the artist’s own state of mind or vision. German Expressionism was more involved with the relationships between art and society, politics and popular culture, German Expressionism...
    1,559 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Mise-En-Scene of Metropolis
    An Expressionist Vision German Expressionism is a unique film style that came out of Weimer Germany, the period between World War I and World War II. It focused mainly on the visual aspects on the screen meant to express emotions that trigger more personal reactions from the audience. According to David Hudson, German expressionism was an exploration "into juxtaposing light and shadow" as well as madness and obsession in an urban setting complete with complex architectural structures. When...
    1,752 Words | 5 Pages
  • Significance of Metropolis(Film) - 638 Words
    Metropolis Fritz Lang's Metropolis is a very influential movie that portrays several underlying meanings that allows the viewer to distinguish for himself. Metropolis was the first science fiction film made, which symbolized a new mark in the film industry. It was produced in Germany in 1927, directed by Fritz Lang. This film tells a story of the world of thinkers and workers. The thinkers are people who live in a life of luxury. The workers are the people who live...
    638 Words | 4 Pages
  • Self Reflexive - 1132 Words
    Movies and Meaning – Summary Chapter 8 – Modes of Screen Reality Pages 289-325 Key Outcomes • Explain the basic modes of screen reality. • Describe the principles of narrative, character behavior, and audiovisual design that operate in each mode of screen reality. • Differentiate ordinary fictional realism, historical realism, documentary realism, and fictional documentary realism. • Distinguish two modes of cinematic self-reflexivity. • Explain why multiple modes...
    1,132 Words | 4 Pages
  • Irma Stern - the Hunt
    The Hunt - Irma Stern The Hunt is an oil painting painted by South African artist Irma Stern in 1926. The painting depicts a scene of a tribe preparing for a hunt. Within the group of people there are three dogs, a naked child, an elder and the hunters holding their spears and shields. These figures overlap one another creating a pictorial space by creating a foreground, middle ground and background almost as if the scene is falling forward. Linear and atmospheric perspective have also been...
    669 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dracula in comparison to Nosferatu - 888 Words
    F.W. Murnau and Tod Browning, were two great directors who both set out to make a movie based on Bram Stoker's classic horror novel Dracula. Both of these two films, Nosferatu by Murnau and Dracula by Browning share similarities and differences. today I will comparing and contrasting the similarities and differences of the two films. When it comes to directors F.W. Murnau is certainly one name that is prominent. Because he is one of the three great German expressionist filmmakers of the...
    888 Words | 3 Pages
  • Edward Scissorhands - 1032 Words
    Studying Edward Scissorhands Tim Burton really unleashed his imagination for the first time when he made the pop fairytale Edward Scissorhands in 1990. Just as Burton’s success is associated with Batman, his artistic reputation is inextricably linked to Edward Scissorhands. Modern narratives are often updated versions of timeless stories. Edward Scissorhands adapts the structure and conventions of the European fairytale to a contemporary American, suburban setting. Clips mentioned in this...
    1,032 Words | 3 Pages
  • Nosferatu: Silent Film and Dracula
    Horror films of today employ several film techniques to invoke responses from the viewer. However, early silent films relied more on these techniques because without a script, the viewer needs another way to interpret the film. The 1922 silent film Nosferatu directed by F.W. Murnau is one of the first of it's kind to apply what most would consider to be more modern film techniques. Montage plays a key role in this film, as does unusual camera angles, over acting, early special effects,...
    974 Words | 6 Pages
  • Psycho- definition of modern horror films
    Alfred Hitchcock’s amazingly directed film, Psycho is known as the “mother” of all modern horror suspense film. This film makes as there were not much progression of the horror movies since 1960s, when Psycho was produced. Before when Psycho was produced, horror movies generally produced with fictional creatures such as Dracula and Godzilla. Hitchcock was also well known for breaking the conservative way of producing the horror film and he produced new subgenre of horror film called ‘Slashers...
    987 Words | 3 Pages
  • The american horror cinema - 7446 Words
    THE AMERICAN HORROR CINEMA Christophe CHAMBOST ISIC.L2.cinéma Evaluation : Un devoir sur table en examen terminal avec 2 questions de cours (exemple : une question sur le gothique et une question sur un cinéaste) → 50% de la note Un dossier à faire en groupe : prendre une scène d'un film fantastique Américain qui nous paraît intéressante Fantastic The origin of the fantastic as a literary genre started in the 18th century. At that time there was no films but there was an interest for the...
    7,446 Words | 21 Pages
  • The Edward Scissorhands& the Cabinet of Dr Caligari
    the Edward Scissorhands& The Cabinet of Dr Caligari The pale face, messy dark hair, According to the inspiration from the somnambulist Cesare in the Cabinet of Dr Caligari, in 1990, Edward was created in the Edward Scissorhands by Tim Burton. There are a lots of horror element in both of films. However, they are shows us different types of movie. The Cabinet of Dr Caligari is a horror, but the Edward Scissorhands is a drama and romance movie. In the both of films, mise en scene and...
    910 Words | 3 Pages