George Orwell Essays & Research Papers

Best George Orwell Essays

  • George Orwell - 610 Words
    Orwell displays his hatred of imperialism by using the shooting of the elephant as an extended metaphor for imperialism. George Orwell in his essay “Shooting an Elephant” develops his political agenda through the use of the rhetorical devices irony and symbolism. The ironic element of the essay is revealed through when he says “Theoretically- and secretly, of course- I was all for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British.” The symbolism is applied through the killing of...
    610 Words | 2 Pages
  • George Orwell - 404 Words
    George Orwell was born in India in 1903 and died in 1950. He lived in India until his first birthday, when his mother brought him and his sister back to England. Young Orwell had a way with words from the start. It’s been said that his first word was ‘beastly’ and that he wrote his first poem at age 4. He was educated at Eton College. After completing his education, he travelled back to India to live with his dad. However, he regretted this decision after he realised that he didn’t actually like...
    404 Words | 1 Page
  • George Orwell - 495 Words
    AP Essay What will lead the world as we know it into oppression? Is it George Orwell’s vision that what we hate will ruin us, or is it Aldous Huxley’s vision that what we love will ruin us? I agree with the social critic Neil Postman’s assertion that Huxley’s vision is more relevant in today’s society. Being a teenager I am very aware of all the latest technological advancements, I even find myself using them on an everyday basis. But as the dependency for electronics and cell phones...
    495 Words | 2 Pages
  • George Orwell Research Paper
    Glenn Devries Dr. Smith ENG 1302 4/24/08 George Orwell: The Man Behind 1984 Why did you choose George Orwell as your author to research? I chose George Orwell as my author to research because I was interested in learning more about the man behind the novel “1984.” 1984 is a deep novel that is about three totalitarian nations that are always at war with each other in disputed territories so that they can maintain “peace” at their home territory. The three nations are Oceania,...
    1,711 Words | 5 Pages
  • All George Orwell Essays

  • Life and Works of George Orwell
    In his short life, George Orwell managed to author several works which would inspire debate across the political spectrum for years to come due to his extreme views on Totalitarianism as exemplified in his novel, Nineteen Eighty-Four. Orwell is now regarded as one of the finest essayists in Modern English literature because of his inspired common sense and a power of steady thought. Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair in Bengal on January 23, 1903. He lived with his two sisters,...
    3,522 Words | 14 Pages
  • A Hanging by George Orwell - 400 Words
    In the article " A Hanging " written by George Orwell, the main idea is that warden and jailer in Burma should give prisoners a good time and mood to die or even not to die but with other punishment. Before the hanging, prisoners are alive like us. Each time they avoid the puddles and screaming in front of the gallows, the author feels an unspeakable wrongness. The author wrote this story with a emotional tone. He tried to pursaude us in a tone and mood but not actual detial. " I saw the...
    400 Words | 1 Page
  • Essays of George Orwell - 4148 Words
    Book Review [pic] Essays of Orwell [pic] George Orwell (1903 – 1950) [pic] Edited by : M.G.Nayar Review done by : [pic] Fahimuddin Shaikh Roll no. 44 R.H.Patel English Medium B.Ed. College Kadi Sarva VishwaVidyalaya Campus, Sector 23, Gandhinagar. Year 2007-2008 Introduction : 1) The Aims of Book review : The book-review is appreciating, analyzing and criticizing a book wherein the reviewer goes through the book comprehensively to come out with his own ideas...
    4,148 Words | 14 Pages
  • George Orwell “Shooting an Elephant”
    George Orwell “Shooting an Elephant” In the essay “Shooting an Elephant” George Orwell argues that imperialism ruins and hurts not just a countries’ economic, cultural and social structure, but has other far reaching consequences; oppression undermines the psychological, emotional and behavioral development of mankind. Orwell served his country, the British Empire, in Burma during the early 20’s as a police officer. The country was colonized by the most powerful economical leader in...
    397 Words | 2 Pages
  • George Orwell 1984 - 353 Words
    Novels often advocate changes in social or political attitudes or in traditions. One novel that can be seen to advocate such changes is George Orwell’s 1984. This novel takes place in a communist style, totalitarian nation called Oceania. This nation is plagued with horrid politics that could be compared to such regimes as, Communist USSR under Joseph Stalin, and Nazi Germany under Adolf Hitler. The nation is ruled by Big Brother, with the common slogan “Big Brother is watching”....
    353 Words | 1 Page
  • The Satirist George Orwell - 801 Words
    Critical Analysis: Renowned satirist George Orwell masterfully incorporates symbolism into his work fabricated within simple tales of fantasy and delight. On the surface these works seem mild almost childlike. However within layer they are stories that will either horrify you from within because of its biting truth or leave you amused by the parallels drawn from reality. Therefore these pieces of literature are not mere stories but caricatures romanticized with words. ‘1984’ and ‘Shooting an...
    801 Words | 3 Pages
  • "A Hanging" by George Orwell
    Higher Question – Choose an essay or a piece of journalism which has made an impact on you because of its effective style. Discuss how the writer’s style adds to the impact of the content. “A Hanging” by George Orwell is an influential, autobiographical essay, in which the subject of capital punishment is powerfully examined. The essay is based on a prisoner’s execution in a Prisoner of War camp in Burma during the Second World War. In the essay, Orwell is a prison guard for the camp and...
    865 Words | 3 Pages
  • George Orwell Essay - 883 Words
    Matthew Lockhart 12/15/2013 English Essay In the story “On the Rainy River” a 20-year old named Tim O’Brien is about to be given the freedom to go anywhere in life until he receives a draft notice requiring him to join the army in the Vietnam War. Tim O’Brien is tested both physically and mentally. He has the option to flee to Canada or go to the war. Each option would result in abandoning family, friends, and fond memories....
    883 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1984, George Orwell - 415 Words
    1984, George Orwell Winston is the unfortunate victim of a totalitarian society gone haywire. In Oceania 1984, the Party has complete control over every aspect of its citizens’ lives. Telescreens that monitor their movements are found in every house and apartment. If a member of the Thought Police catches you so much as gritting your teeth during one of Big Brother’s speeches, it’s off to the Missionary of Love to be interrogated about your partaking in a conspiracy...
    415 Words | 1 Page
  • George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant
    George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" is an essay about a British police officer living in Lower Burma who goes through the trial and error process of making the right decisions while still trying to maintain an image and position of authority. The officer is hated by the Burmese people, which is clearly shown when he would play football. The Burmese were extremely unfair to the officer due to the fact he was part of the Imperialist group which was oppressing Burma. (para. 1) Although the...
    576 Words | 2 Pages
  • George Orwell 1984 - 4621 Words
    Pauline Ticehurst How far does 1984 reflect the times in which it was written and how far was it a view of the future? In this essay I intend to investigate experiences and historical events in Orwell’s lifetime. These events may have significantly influenced Orwell’s style, structure and theme, contributing to the political and artistic nature of his novel. I also intend to compare the contradictory interpretations of Orwell’s ‘message’. Did he intend 1984 as a warning, a...
    4,621 Words | 12 Pages
  • Shooting an Elephant – George Orwell
    Shooting An Elephant – George Orwell Orwell begins his essay by describing the intense hatred of the Burmese for their European masters. In Moulmein, in Lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people, the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me. Europeans were spit at, jeered at, and insulted. As a police officer I was an obvious target and was baited whenever it seemed safe to do so. I feel his sympathies were on the side of the Burmese,...
    785 Words | 2 Pages
  • George Orwell Notes - 971 Words
    George Orwell Research Annie Ward His real name and reason behind this change. * He was born as Eric Arthur Blair * The reason he changed his name was due to a sudden change in his own lifestyle; we went from being a pillar of the British imperial establishment to a literary and political rebel. * He never fully abandoned his original name, but all of his official work came under the name of George Orwell * The surname he adopted came from a river in East Anglia called Orwell...
    971 Words | 3 Pages
  • "A Hanging" by George Orwell
    People sometimes undergo difficult situations when they are forced to carry out orders by authority. George Orwell's "A Hanging" is a descriptive essay about capital punishment. The setting of this essay is placed in an early twentieth-century prison in Burma, a country ruled by the British Empire. Considering that George Orwell was an imperial police officer in Burma, it is highly probable that this essay is related to his own experience. The essay, presented through the eyes of the narrator,...
    1,018 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jimmy Cross and George Orwell Comparison
    George Orwell and Jimmy Cross Character Comparison In the two short stories, Shooting an Elephant and the Things They Carried there are certain similarities and differences that George Orwell and Jimmy Cross hold. Each character in the short stories has there own different situation they are in, but they both are in a foreign land and they both have to take orders and do what there country is asking of them. However, even though each situation is different they both deal with some of the same...
    857 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Big Brother: Impact on George Orwell
    Pedro Villa The Big Brother The Author introduces the book with a important aspect in the book which is “Big Brother” and this goes to show that in the book “Big Brother” is used to manipulate may people and also mentioned so many times and is always watching you so Orwell says, and he uses “Big Brother” as a metaphor that tells how in the world we are actually being watched and how it is turning into a reality and Orwell uses “Big Brother” in a sadistic way. Big Brother...
    590 Words | 2 Pages
  • SHOOTING AN ELEPHANT, George Orwell: Commentary
    _SHOOTING AN ELEPHANT BY GEORGE ORWELL:_ _Commentary_ Political, social & ethical issues raised in Orwell's essay "Shooting an Elephant" create a controversial storyline in which the events metaphorically symbolize the colonial imperialism of the time. Set in Burma, 1936, the context is based around the anti-European attitudes existent post the Anglo-Burmese Wars. Orwell's positions, as police officer for the despotic British governments, required him to hold authority over the Burmese,...
    605 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1984 Symbols: George Orwell Novel
    Symbols George Orwell novel 1984 contains symbols and images throughout the novel. Although symbols such as rats, the coral paperweight, songs, and Winston’s varicose ulcer only appear infrequently, they do provide important functions. Winston had a reoccurring dream which found himself standing in front of a wall of darkness of which on the other side there was something to dreadful to face. He always woke up prior to finding out what was on the other side. After awaking during one of...
    916 Words | 3 Pages
  • George Orwell Once Said Of The Imperial
    Julia Rios Mr. Blacklock English 11 AP 20 May 2014 Orwell 996 George Orwell once said concerning the imperialist, “He wears a mask, and his face grows to fit it.” Imperialism, as it is defined by Merriam Webster, is “the effect that a powerful country or group of countries has in changing or influencing the way people live in other, poorer countries.” Orwell’s essay, “Shooting an Elephant,” implies his feelings towards British imperialism and how much he resented during his time as a British...
    356 Words | 1 Page
  • Childhood in 'Such, Such Were the Joys’ by George Orwell
    Childhood in 'Such, such were the joys’ by George Orwell In his essay entitled ‘Such, such were the joys’ George Orwell describes his life at the boarding school, St Cyprian’s in Sussex, from the age of eight to the age of thirteen. He focuses on his own inability to assimilate in the new environment and the preferential treating received by the wealthier students. Orwell describes childhood as a trying and harsh trial. He portrays it through the eyes of the child that believes most of the...
    323 Words | 1 Page
  • George Orwell - Animal Farm & 1984
    Brenda Fernandez Professor Germek Major Authors Research Paper December 22, 2009 Language: The Ultimate Weapon for Absolute Control The ultimate goal of a totalitarian regime is achieving the complete deterioration of the independence and strength of the people in its society, as well as regulating every aspect of their lives. Accomplishing complete control through brute force is undoubtedly an effective means of obtaining the results desired. However, the pervasion and...
    3,159 Words | 9 Pages
  • Animal Farm, a story by George Orwell
    Animal Farm Submitted by Avery Beacham Fall semester 2013 In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements of Tenth Grade Honors Literature Animal farm is a classic portrayal of how power can affect the goals and hopes of society. Animal farm, a story by George Orwell begins with a revolution, and a lot of hopes for a perfect society being developed by the animals by kicking off the humans from the farm but slowly the leading officials, the pigs, get a taste of power and from then on things...
    721 Words | 2 Pages
  • George Orwell Coming Up for Air
    Changes in England: 1900 to 1939 George Orwell's novel, Coming Up for Air, portrays England at two different times. The story is based around George Bowling in 1939 and his life in the suburbs of London on Ellesmere Road, where all the houses are the same. He is very cynical of the world around him and dreams of his times as a child in Lower Binfield when things were not perfect, but not yet ruined by the Great War. The vision of 1900 England versus England in 1939 creates a sharp contrast...
    1,323 Words | 3 Pages
  • Animal Farm by George Orwell. Essay
    Animal Farm by George Orwell was trying to show the dislike of communism. Because the old form of government end up being quiet similar to the new form. Orwell shows this by getting rid of Mr. Jones for mistreating the animals, and overtime Napoleon a pig comes to power, the same thing happened but with a different look. George Santayana wrote, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” This quote is similar to Orwell’s dislikes and the way he shows it in the book. Both the...
    283 Words | 1 Page
  • Experience Outweighs Theoretical Knowledge in the Works of George Orwell
    Writing 122 25 January 2014 Experience Outweighs Theoretical Knowledge in the Works of George Orwell George Orwell’s essay “Shooting an Elephant” is the first of his works I was introduced to. I could not have asked for a better introduction to his writing style. It is one I can relate to. Even though I don’t consider myself a gifted linguist, the same type of life experiences are where I would find my writing voice. I feel very confident when I speak from experience. Theoretical knowledge,...
    1,289 Words | 4 Pages
  • A Presentation of George Orwell and His Protest Novels
    Eric Arthur Blair was born on June 5, 1903, in Bengal, India. His father was not a wealthy man. He supported his family only on the salary of a civil servant. When his writing career began, his penname became George Orwell. Orwell received his formal education from Eton Academy during a period ranging from 1917 to 1921. After completion of Eton, Orwell did not continue his education; instead he joined forces with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma. He served with the police until he began...
    1,403 Words | 4 Pages
  • Critical Analysis and Evaluation of 1984, by George Orwell.
    George Orwell 1984 The New American Library Copyright 1961 George Orwell George Orwell, whose real name was Eric Blair, was born in Bengal, India, in 1903. When he was eight years old, as it was customary, his mother brought him back to England to be educated. He was sent to a boarding school on the south coast, a school whose students were sons of the upper class. He was allowed in with lower tuition and not being from a wealthy background, he was subject to snobbery of the others at the...
    1,473 Words | 4 Pages
  • 'Why I Write' George Orwell Review
    George Orwell’s essay ‘Why I Write?’ is a detailed account of his way towards becoming a writer. He takes the reader on a journey from his first poems and stories to the pieces of writing that make him famous to finally explain the four reasons of writing. Orwell experiments with ‘a mere description of what I was doing and the things I saw’ and naturalistic books before he becomes a political writer. Why a political writer? Well, it is the age he lives in that forces him into it. His...
    1,512 Words | 4 Pages
  • “Animal Farm�?, by George Orwell Essay Example
    “Animal Farm”, by George Orwell, is an allegorical novella based on the Russian Revolution. It is a story where animals on the farm begin a revolution in order to be treated equally. They exile the farmer to be free of his control so that the working class animals could benefit from their labour. However, the pigs took over the farm and, before too long, the farm returned to its original form, controlled by a “human-like” dictator. “Animal Farm” foregrounds many different themes associated with...
    860 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1984 by George Orwell: Challenging Relationships and Power Play
    1984 by George Orwell explores the challenging relationships between different sets of powerplay. It ultimately maneuvers subordinates into positions where it is able to hold power against them, shaping the wants and desires of the powerless. The public awareness of this use of power is nil, as everyone struggles to be the perfect party member, yet as individuals, the desire to hold what is beyond their grasp calls them, and members of the public strive to find the pieces of their...
    530 Words | 2 Pages
  • The role of the pigs in the novel "Animal Farm" by George Orwell.
    The pigs are perhaps the most interesting characters in the novel, "Animal Farm", written by George Orwell. They bring conflict and perceive as the most important animals in their Animal Revolution and most important people involved in Russian history. Throughout this fairytale, they become what they had hoped to destroy. The role of the pigs in this story is that they are true leaders. They represent the Bolsheviks of Russia. They are the highest in the animal society structure and highest in...
    757 Words | 2 Pages
  • George Orwell Dystopia Novel: Animal Farm
    Essay Prompt: At the start of George Orwell’s dystopia novel, Animal Farm, the animals set out to establish a perfect community, a “society of animals set free from hunger and the whip, all equal, each working according to his capacity, the strong protecting the weak.” However, by the end of the novel, we see that a very different society is actually formed. A cruel dictatorship rules: no animal can speak his mind; all animals work in hunger, pain, and gross inequality. In a brief two-page...
    295 Words | 3 Pages
  • George Orwell vs. Peter Huber with 1984
    Big Brother is watching you. What does one think of when they hear this? The book 1984 or more precisely, George Orwell, the author. George Orwell was a man who wrote multiple Novels, with some of them being analogies to past governments. Due to his great success with his novels, there were plenty of people who tended to disagree with his writing, or even with his way of thinking. Peter Huber was one of these people. He completely disagreed with the way Orwell thought technology would control...
    851 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Hanging The short story, “A Hanging” by George Orwell,
    A Hanging The short story, ?A Hanging? by George Orwell, poses many problematic and significant questions. Of these questions the one that intrigued me the most was, how does the narrator?s emotions and feelings change throughout the story, and how does this change affect the theme of the story? These questions are significant in general because they are very important to the theme and major conflict of the story. These questions are also important to the story specifically, because it shows how...
    1,009 Words | 3 Pages
  • "1984" by George Orwell: Individualism: Preventing the Terror of Totalitarianism
    1984, by George Orwell, is, on the surface, the story of one man's rebellion against the system in a futuristic totalitarian world. Every word and movement of the citizens is monitored and controlled; even their thoughts are not their own. They are manipulated by the insidious propaganda of the government, Big Brother, that serves to weaken the power of the people. This relates to what the dictator, Josef Stalin, once said: "Power is not in the hands of those who vote, but rather in the hands of...
    978 Words | 3 Pages
  • Eric Arthur Blair, better known as George Orwell
    Born in 1903, Eric Arthur Blair, better known as George Orwell, was an English political novelist and journalist, who became a recognized writer due to his sharp criticism of political oppression around the world. Having experienced hard times during the Spanish Civil War and the Russian Revolution, Orwell turned into a biting critic of both capitalist and communist political systems. He was a devoted socialist, who believed in the consolidation of a government which aimed to support and...
    254 Words | 1 Page
  • Analysis of a narrative text: “Shooting an Elephant” (George Orwell)
    Analysis of a narrative text: Shooting an Elephant (George Orwell) “Shooting an Elephant” is an autobiographically influenced short story written by George Orwell and published in 1936. It deals with the inner conflict of an imperial police officer in Burma who feels pressured by the Burmese and forced to kill an outraged elephant in order to prove himself and his status as an imperial police officer. The short story can be divided into two parts. In the first two paragraphs the narrator...
    1,074 Words | 3 Pages
  • Book Report on "Burmese Days" by George Orwell
    About the book: The book "Burmese Days" was written by George Orwell and published first in 1934. Orwell took the inspiration for this first novel of his from the experiences he gained during his service as an imperial police officer in Burma in the late 1920s. There he was confronted with extreme forms of imperialism, causing racism and also chauvinism. These are also the main topics of the novel and although they are wrapped up in the story of a single man's fate, John Flory's, these...
    5,669 Words | 13 Pages
  • The Oceania Society Depicted in the 1984 George Orwell Novel
    The Oceania society depicted in the 1984 George Orwell novel is simply driven by propaganda. It seems as though every citizen of the "Super State" country must interact with a daily intake of propaganda create by the government so that control is maintained. Even the "non-citizen" Proletarian community, which is the ignorant majority, is lead into a life filled with propaganda that inflicts feelings such as fear and hatred so that they can be controlled in a mental manner. As an inner Party...
    343 Words | 1 Page
  • Animal Farm by George Orwell: Communism in the Form of a Satire
    Animal Farm The views of communism are not very common today simply because of how impractical they are. The human nature to create hierarchy is a direct contradiction to the views of communist society. Animal Farm is George Orwell’s comment on communism in the form of a satire where the animals on a farm rebel against the farmer and seize control. From the first stirring of rebellion, there are resolutions to keep all animals equal. However, the farm soon went from a utopia to...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analyzing the Rhetoric Strategies of Shooting the Elepthant by George Orwell
    Márton Mezei 23.02.2012. AP English Analyzing the rhetorical strategies of „Shooting an Elephant” “Shooting an Elephant” was written by George Orwell, and it describes an incident he experienced during the time he spent in a small town in India, as a police officer serving the British Empire. I found the writing interesting because of Orwell’s use of rhetorical strategies that slowly build up to the conclusion of the story, along with the peak of the action. The story ends in a detailed...
    941 Words | 3 Pages
  • Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell: Experience of a Police Officer in Burma
    November 20, 2012 Shooting an Elephant In society, we are sometimes obligated to make a decision on the spot, without looking back or looking at any options around us. It may mean you have to make a decision for a big group or have to make a decision for yourself; in this case, both of those options weren’t good ones for the man who killed the elephant. In “Shooting an Elephant” George Orwell narrates a story about his experience as a police officer in Burma that had killed an extreme...
    1,098 Words | 3 Pages
  • Summary/Response Essay: Peter Firchow’s Article Regarding George Orwell
    Firchow, Peter. “Homage to George Orwell.” Midwest Quarterly 53.1 (2011): 77-94. Academic Search Complete. Web. 7 Oct. 2012. According to the article “Homage to George Orwell” by Peter Firchow, George Orwell should be considered a literary genius for accomplishments comparable to those of other writers thought to be geniuses and characteristics unique to his writing style. Firchow argues against Lionel Trilling’s (“one of the most influential critics of the century”) explicit claim that...
    1,232 Words | 4 Pages
  • Belonging essay -George Orwell 1984 - Raimond Gaita Romulus, My Father
    When discussing the concept of belonging it is often quite difficult to develop and state a comprehensive overview of this wide-ranging human need; in which the rules of society have a bearing on an individual’s potential to belong. Belonging is found in different forms, belonging to place, people, self and time. In a social context of fear, the strength of personal conscience and the human spirit will be tested, and often appearance of public belonging is a mask covering the private desire to...
    721 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animal Farm by George Orwell: 20th Century European History
    “Animal Farm” Animal Farm is a story that cannot be understood and appreciated without a basic understanding of 20th-century European history. While author George Orwell may have featured talking, thinking animals and labeled the story a fairy tale, it very clearly references events in Europe in the time period leading up to and during World War II. Animal Farm is openly critical of all of the major players in the European theater of that time, and each is referenced by an animal at the farm....
    654 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animal Farm by George Orwell: a Story Showing That Absolute Power Corrupts a Society
    Animal Farm The Russian Revolution is an example that absolute power often corrupts society. In the novel Animal Farm, author George Orwell shows through Boxer’s faithfulness to Napoleon that absolute power can control one’s mind. Boxer adopted two phrases that expressed his loyalty and faithfulness to Napoleon. Boxer’s devotion began when Napoleon became leader. Immediately after, Napoleon ended the Sunday debates and decided to start the construction of the windmill. Numerous...
    358 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animal Farm by George Orwell: a Novel Developing the Idea of Communism
    1) The idea of development of Communism is meant to be good. a. Weak or strong, clever or simple, we are all brothers. No animal must ever kill any other animal, all animals are equal. b. Nobody stole, nobody grumble over his rations, the quarreling and biting and jealousy which had been normal features of life in the old days had almost disappeared. c. All animals are equal. 2) Formation of Communism d. Major’s speed builds to the rhetorical climax of “all...
    525 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reflection Paper on "Politics and the English Language", an Essay by George Orwell
    "Politics and the English Language" is an essay by George Orwell published in 1946 where he criticizes the way written English language has evolved. Orwell uses five texts from various contemporary authors to identify in them the "perversions" in the evolution of the language. He then classifies these into four main fallacies: "dying metaphors" or cliches, "operators or verbal false limbs" or the elimination of simple verbs and the use of passive voice rather than active, "pretentious diction"...
    302 Words | 1 Page
  • George Orwell wrote a novel in 1945 called Animal Farm.
    George Orwell wrote a novel in 1945 called Animal Farm. It was written as an allegory of the Russian revolution. An allegory is a story that has things that represent people, places, or objects. The humans are symbolized as evil and oppressive and the animals decide to change things. I believe that the novel proves the saying “ignorance is bliss” is true. Napoleon and the other pigs are able to take control of the farm because of the other animals’ ignorance. Throughout the story...
    440 Words | 1 Page
  • Comparison between George Orwell and Martin Luther King Jr.'s Literature
    After reading pieces of literature from both George Orwell and Martin Luther King, the pieces of literature were wrote about thirteen years apart therefore they used very different methods, perspectives, and purposes.. Martin Luther King uses allusions and a variety of indirect insults where he states nation flaws but does not direct them towards someone directly. Orwell uses more themes, morality plays, myths and metaphors. As Kings purpose is to inform the audience that they are aware of the...
    760 Words | 2 Pages
  • Discuss the theme of power in the novel “Animal Farm” by George Orwell.
    Discuss the theme of power in the novel “Animal Farm” by George Orwell. Power is the ability to do something or act in a particular way. “Power corrupts, but absolute power corrupts absolutely”-and this is proved in Orwell's short novel. The statement means that mostly people who acquire power eventually use it for personal purposes. At first they might try to focus their power on things that can help to make the lives of others better, but unfortunately if this power is unlimited, they...
    759 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ap Orwell - 642 Words
    College Board Standards: n STANDARD 1 Rhetorical Analysis and Planning Objective W1.1 Student analyzes components of purpose, goals, audience, and genre. STANDARD 2 Generating Content Objectives W2.1 Student takes inventory of what he or she knows and needs to know. W2.2 Student generates, selects, connects, and organizes information and ideas. STANDARD 3 Drafting Objectives W3.1 Student generates text to develop points within the preliminary organizational structure. W3.2 Student...
    642 Words | 3 Pages
  • Orwell; the Pigs - 621 Words
    Animal Farm was written by George Orwell to convey his opinion of certain political structures and their very simple but fatal flaws. It is the story of a rebellion fueled by endless hope and idealistic dreams of freedom and equality. It is also a mocking commentary upon the lives of men and their generic lust for power and prosperity. Within the story each of the characters has certain metaphorical representations to the political system's of reality. Boxer a pseudonym of the working class; Mr...
    621 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Hanging Orwell - 749 Words
    A Hanging 1. George Orwell's writing "A Hanging" provides his firsthand account of the hanging of a Hindu man who represents the last moments of natural life. a. The significant observation i. The man, on the way to the gallows, deliberately avoids a puddle in order to insure that his feet do not get wet. 1. Orwell found this to be very interesting ii. The man shows how he is still conscious and a living creature 2. Therefore, Orwell’s theme revolves around the inhuman nature of the...
    749 Words | 2 Pages
  • Orwell Analysis - 431 Words
    In the story from “Shooting an Elephant”, the author George Orwell employs irony and simile(s) to develop a nostalgic yet relieved attitude regarding shooting the elephant in order to comment about imperialism. The author’s choice in the usage of irony reveals his sense of imperialism. In paragraph 11 the author George Orwell reports “—but I heard the devilish roar of glee that went up from the crowd”. The use of irony emphasizes the peer pressure that the author felt by the Native people. The...
    431 Words | 1 Page
  • Colonialism and Orwell - 816 Words
    While looking through a collection of magazines, I recently stumbled upon an essay titled Marrakech, a text describing the precarious environment, to say the least in Marrakech, a part of French colony of Morocco. The author, George Orwell wrote the essay in 1939. The historical context in which the writer was submerged was brutally ironic for European countries in relations to their African colonies. The outbreak of WWII was fragmenting Europe, and indirectly the world. Fear was spreading...
    816 Words | 2 Pages
  • Outline For Orwell - 636 Words
    I: General Introduction II: Biography III: George Orwell is distinguished as one of the most influential writers to the English Culture in the 20th century. Notorious for having written satirical fiction and societal criticism, Orwell is best known for his works of Animal Farm (1945) and 1984 (1949). Within his novels Orwell echoes the presence of a struggle for freedom in a society that refuses it, the similarities of the characters, and a reoccurring theme of a fear of corruption of...
    636 Words | 3 Pages
  • Orwell essay - 1027 Words
    Practice Essay - Orwell In the context of your critical study, to what extent does your response to the closing statements of Why I Write inform your judgement of his essay and Orwell’s essays as a whole? In your response, make detailed reference to Why I Write and at least ONE other essay set for study. Response: The closing statements of George Orwell’s essay ‘Why I Write’ reflect not only Orwell’s subject matter and stance within this essay, but also demonstrate his approach to...
    1,027 Words | 3 Pages
  • Comparison between characters in George Orwells novel "animal Farm" and real life political figures in the time of soviet russia.
    The book animal farm, written by George Orwell, is believed to tell the story of not just a story about some rebellious animals, but represents how the Russian revolution took place. Many believe this because of the way he portrays certain characters in the novel. Such as snowball being represented as Leon Trotsky, old major being represented as , and the ruthless leader of the farm napoleon representing the leader of the U.S.S.R. Josef starlin. After the rebellion of manor farm, napoleon...
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  • Condemning British Dominion – Shedding Light on the Truths of Imperialism: an Article Critique of “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell
    Imperialism is established by more economically powerful nations interfering with the affairs of a weaker country. While many white men may often think of Imperialism as a form of civilizing the savages of a foreign land, George Orwell condemns it and thinks of it as only a façade of power. In ”Shooting an Elephant”, he conveys the ironic, powerless and evil nature of Imperialism through the experience of himself as a young British officer shooting the elephant against his own will in order to...
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  • How Has George Orwell Used Animal Farm to Present His View of Human Nature?
    George Orwell’s Animal Farm is a satirical allegory through which he presents his cynical view of human nature. He uses the animal fable effectively to expose the issues of injustice, exploitation and inequality in human society. Orwell uses the allegory, Animal Farm, to present the story of The Russian Revolution and essentially express his opinions on the matter. By plainly exposing the unjust and corrupt system that is communism, Orwell is ultimately presenting his pessimistic view of...
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  • Gearge Orwell and Ayn Rand
    We’ve got the Whole World in Our Hands? George Orwell’s Animal Farm and Ayn Rand’s Anthem were both published during a period in world history where repressive totalitarian dictatorships were increasingly placing a stranglehold on the social, intellectual, and political rights of people all across the world, with the rise of fascism in Europe and the absolute despotism of Stalinist Russia. Rand and Orwell sought to both deflate utopian propaganda and give a wake up call to the masses with...
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  • Comparison of Orwell and Hazlitt - 483 Words
    Taylor Mace 6th hr. George Orwell and William Hazlitt use similar and different techniques to express their opinions on writing. These two writers are very similar in their tone. Orwell and Hazlitt both have a formal tone, although they go about using their formal tones in separate ways. Orwell’s tone is formal because he writes as if he is trying to educate the reader. Hazlitt’s formal tone is more just stating his belief and trying to tell us something. Although these two essays have...
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  • Orwell S Writing Style
    Natalia Garcia Mrs. Rogers English IIH, Period 2 3 February 2014 Writing Style of George Orwell Animal Farm by George Orwell is a satirical piece that portrays and mocks the events leading up to the Russian Revolution. In this story, Orwell’s style is simple and unsentimental. He is able to do so by using straightforward English, few figurative language or rhetorical devices, and by creating rather emotionless characters. George Orwell’s plain language contributes to the unsentimental side of...
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  • Summary and opinion on George Orwells "Shooting of an Elphant" good paper many qoutes and examples.
    English 121.561 2004-11-05 Sympathy for a Tyrant In "Shooting an Elephant," George Orwell finds himself in a difficult situation involving an elephant. The fate of the elephant lies in his hands. Only he can make the final decision. In the end, due to Orwell's decision, the elephant lay dying in a pool of blood. Orwell wins the sympathy of readers by expressing the pressure he feels as an Anglo-Indian in Burma, struggling with his morals, and showing a sense of compassion for the dying...
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  • Analysis of an essay by George Orwell criticizing the euphemisms used by the U.S. government + other examples of today's euphemisms
    Bad Memories for Orwell. George Orwell demonstrated how writers and politicians use euphemisms, doublespeak, and other misconceptions to mislead their audience and hide their real agenda; he exposed politicians in his times and predicted future trends and practices in the English language usage. He expected the English language to deteriorate and individual thoughts and expression to be limited. His goal was to make people understand this practice and see through public speeches and political...
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  • How does George Orwell convey his thoughts and feelings to the reader in Animal Farm
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  • Huxley V. Orwell - 1015 Words
    Brave New World v. 1984 June 8, 2011 It is no question that both Huxley and Orwell were displeased with our societal norms by their predictions in Brave New World and 1984. However, the two famous novels could not have differed more in their visions of tomorrow. Huxley portrays a nation of pleasure addicted, mindless beings merely existing. Orwell illustrated such a strict regime that the pursuit of knowledge would be banned and our voices would be silenced. Imagine living in a world...
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  • Crappy Orwell Essay - 1852 Words
    Orwell Essay Draft The highly political and literary worlds constructed from the writer George Orwell has allowed audiences to see glimpses of themselves among these worlds, as well as provoking acts of analysis and reflection within themselves, decades after these worlds and opinions were initially established. The ongoing relevance of Orwell is due to an inspiring recipe of writing greatness. Orwell’s authentic craftsmanship, directness of expression, straightforward-simple style, methodical...
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  • Imperialism in Conrad and Orwell Works
    At the turn of the 20th century, African states had been colonized and were being used by the European nations with imperialistic ideals. With imperialism came the praise and promotion of the imperialistic ideas. However, unlike other times in history where a nation had taken over another, there was criticism written by some of the writers living in the imperialistic countries. Two of these writers were Joseph Conrad, who wrote Heart of Darkness, and George Orwell, who wrote “Shooting an...
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  • George Orwell's a Hanging - 990 Words
    Orwell’s A Hanging: the Catalyst Composition By Derin Tolu “I let go of the dog, and it galloped immediately to the back of the gallows; but when it got there it stopped short, barked, and then retreated into a corner of the yard, where it stood among the weeds, looking timorously out at us” (Orwell 217). Can a dog be more human than humans themselves? In George Orwell’s A Hanging the dog is more human than any of the people observing the atrocity that is being carried out in front of their...
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  • George Orwell's Contributions to Society
    Works Cited Baker, Russell. Preface. Animal Farm. By George Orwell. 1996. 50th Anniversary ed. New York: Penguin Books Ltd, 1946. v-xii. Print. Glover, Beaird. "Nineteen Eighty-Four." Masterplots, Fourth Edition (2010): 1-3. Literary Reference Center. Web. 5 Apr. 2012. Knapp, John V. "George Orwell." Critical Survey Of Long Fiction, Fourth Edition (2010): 1-6. Literary Reference Center. Web. 2 Apr. 2012. "ORWELL, George." (n.d.): Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia. Web. 2...
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  • George Orwell's "Shooting a Elephant"
    English 121 115 Erica Holcomb 09/12/2012 “Shooting an Elephant” “Shooting an Elephant” is an essay by George Orwell in which he describes his experience of being called upon to shoot an aggressive elephant while working as a police officer in Burma. Because the locals expect him to do the job, he does so against his better judgment. The act of caving-in to the pressure he felt from the locals enlightens him to the underlying duties that come with being part of the imperialistic movement...
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  • George Orwell's Animal Farm
    Introduction:Animal Farm is a short story written by George Orwell in 1945. He had a lot of difficulty getting it published due to its underlying criticism of the political situation in Russia at the time. The story takes place on a farm somewhere in England. The owner of the farm, Mr.Jones, comes into conflict with the animals. The animals rebel, and finally scare him away. Two of the strongest animals, Napoleon and Snowball (two pigs), think that they can run the farm....
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  • George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant”
    George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” 1. On page 517 of The Norton Reader, Shorter Edition, the first question asks, “Why did Orwell shoot the elephant? Account for the motives that led him to shoot. Then categorize them as personal motives, circumstantial motives, social motives, or political motives. Is it easy to assign his motives to categories? Why or why not * Orwell did shoot the elephant because he felt the pressure that came from thousands of native people behind him when...
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  • George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant"
    Billy Crawford Ms. Myrna Sam AP English Language 23 January 2013 The Elephant Contradiction To be liked by others is a very controversial term. In George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” the “sahib” struggles as he battles himself in a self destroying and virtue deciding internal conflict. This mental battle is one that all must eventually endure. There is no definitive solution as all choices lead to new problems and consequences. The “sahib” wants to gain acceptance by the crowd...
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  • George Orwell's Motives for Writing
    George Orwell’s motives for writing In the essay, “Why I Write” by George Orwell, he explains his reasons and motives for writing. He gives us a brief summary of his literary attempts at becoming a writer from a young age to his completed works as an experienced writer at an older age. He justifies how a person’s motives for writing changes over time due to their experiences in life and the atmosphere of the world around them. George Orwell lists four motives for writing in which he...
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  • Reaction to George Orwell’s 1984
    Haris Ibrar Professor Ana Marie English 12 March 18, 2014 Reaction to George Orwell’s 1984 A world without privacy is a world without conscious. We live in what is said to be a modern society filled with new technological innovations on a daily basis. A society can’t withstand without its leaders therefore we have our so called government to lead us but little are we aware of the totalitarianism that goes on, some even to the logical extreme. In the novel “1984” George Orwell reveals us to a...
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  • Essay on George Orwell's 1984
     Unit 3: A Struggle for Freedom Activity 8: Literary Essay Brittany Ennis ENG3U Mrs. King July 19th, 2013 In the book 1984 by George Orwell, there is a lot of symbolism that represents one major themes of the book. These symbols reflect the theme that a totalitarian government does not allow freedom. The goal is to control the thoughts, the hearts and the minds of the population. Those that are different are centred out to...
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  • "If thought corrupt language, language can corrupt thought", this is a statemnt from an essay "politics and the English language"written by George Orwell.
    "If thought corrupt language, language can corrupt thought" This is a statement from the "Politics and the English language" written by George Orwell. He says, " A bad usage can spread by tradition and imitation". The whole essay is mocking other writers on their language usage. He claims that the language is not used to its full extent. People use words the size of continents and in the end those big words say the same thing as a three-letter word. Those people also end up confusing them...
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  • Orwell: Shooting An Elephant - analysis paper
    Orwell Analysis Paper Prompt 3 “Read carefully paragrphs 11-13 of Orwells Shooting An Elephant. THen write a well-organized essay explaining how the author uses stylistic devices and rhetoical strategies to convey his attitude toward the shooting of the elephant. Elephants were once, and are currently, considered prized possessions in some parts of the world. The taming of these majestic creatures dates all the way back to BC and, since then, elephants have continued to hold high...
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  • Manipulations of Memory Used by Orwell and Williams
    Manipulations of memory used by Orwell and Williams The steady development of “Big Brother” as the all-controlling entity in George Orwell’s 1984 is the premise for the role truth plays throughout the novel. Truth is functioned against society for the benefit of the government. Similarly, Tennessee Williams creates a uniquely different environment for his characters in The Glass Menagerie while maintaining the same function of truth as a source of distortion and control. Collectively, the...
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  • This essay is about George Orwell. . .I just had to compare some of his works. It is from my freshman year of college. . .enjoy!
    Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. George Orwell re-uses many of his themes in order to get his point across. In "Why I Write", Orwell states that one of the reasons he writes is for political purpose. He expresses this theme in his essays, "An Episode of Bed-wetting" and "St. Cyprian's", as well as his novels, "1984" and "Animal Farm". In "An Episode of Bed-wetting" and "St. Cyprian's", Orwell expresses how he feels about the politics in the...
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  • Orwell and Langston - Shooting an Elephant and Salvation
    Aurelian M. Gogean What you give up to fit in? Many people sacrifice their beliefs and values to be accepted in society and to win the societies approval. George Orwell in “Shooting an elephant” and Langston Hughes in “Salvation” deal with the issue of “fitting in” in very different ways. George Orwell describes to us in “Shooting an elephant” the struggle that his character faces when to win the mobs approval and respect when he shoots down an innocent animal and sacrifices what he...
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  • Analysis of George Orwell's 'Shooting an Elephant'
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  • A Review of George Orwell's Animal Farm
    The theme of Animal Farm is that power can overcome an individual and be abused by an individual. Napoleon becomes the head pig and he becomes somewhat like a dictator. The other animals have barely any say in how the farm is run. For example, immediately after Snowball is kicked out of the farm shown on page sixty-eight it says, “He announced the Sunday-morning Meetings would come to an end. They were unnecessary he said, and wasted time.” It seems like Napoleon has not consulted with...
    796 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Historical Background of George Orwell's 1984
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  • Review: George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant
    George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” “Shooting an Elephant” is an essay written by George Orwell and published in 1936 (Orwell 66). Orwell was born June 25, 1903, as Eric Arthur Blair and passed away January 21, 1950, in India (“George Orwell Biography”). Orwell was known for his journals, novels, and essays published about his own political views (“George Orwell Biography”). Orwell traveled to Burma after not doing good enough in school to earn a scholarship and decided to join the imperial...
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  • George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant: a Summary
    George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant: a Summary George Orwell, from a first person narrative perspective of a British officer in Moulmein, Burma, writes an autobiographical essay titled Shooting an Elephant, confessing the inner conflict of a British police officer. From his experience in British-ruled India in the early Twentieth Century, his essay shows feelings in the area and the East against Europe, and faults of the imperialism. While he was there he is having to do something that caused...
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  • Response to George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant"
    Although many people believe that racism has disappeared from our minds after all those solutions of trying to set equal rights in the world’s history, it still exists today, and will probably never vanish from our thinking. Some may clearly express it, whereas others may express racism unnoticeably, even to themselves. George Orwell, in “Shooting an Elephant”, tells a story of his past when he killed an elephant in order to please the Burmese crowd. At the time, Orwell was a white Indian...
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  • Instability of Totalitarianism in George Orwell’s 1984
    Instability of Totalitarianism in George Orwell’s 1984 A government enforces procedures in which a society must follow. Governments contrast by deciding to either be stringent, lenient or even moderate. The protagonist, Winston realizes that the government which he resides in maintains absolute control. Revolution results in extreme punishment that eventually leads to death. With the rest of the society brainwashed Winston tries to successfully find a way to revolt. Throughout the...
    855 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mollie in George Orwell's Animal Farm
    English 10 Honors Period 3 April 13, 2011 Animal Farm Essay “The unrestricted competition so commonly advocated does not leave us the survival of the fittest. The unscrupulous succeed best in accumulating wealth” (Rutherford B. Hayes). This statement asserts the fact that when people compete for survival the best individuals more often do not survive and in fact the more conceited and moral deprived individuals do survive. This shows they are best at getting what they need to survive and...
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  • Setting and Characters of George Orwell's 1984
    Controlling idea Orwell’s purpose in writing 1984 and the understanding of the writer’s thoughts through a thematic analysis of characterization and symbolism Good morning Mr Caruso and good morning students. 1984 has been heralded an influential piece of literature upon its publishing. This speech will be a deconstruction of the novel 1984 and what the author, George Orwell, intended in it’s writing. Many of Orwell’s personal values and political viewpoints have been integrated within the...
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  • How Does Orwell Create a Dystopia in "1984"?
    A dystopia is the opposite of a utopia. The meaning of utopia is a perfect place. Therefore making a dystopia a nightmarish place with many things wrong with it. The book "1984" is based in a dystopian world in 1984. This is the future from when the book was written. Orwell has to use many ideas and very twisted thoughts and nightmares to create this world, which seems to become more like reality year by year. An example of the dystopia being created would be the weather note on the first line...
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  • Main Idea and Purpose for Shooting an Elephant by Orwell
    The main idea of the story “Shooting an Elephant" by Orwell is the effect of the oppressor is not only on the oppressed, but himself. There are several evidences found in the text to support the main idea. First, the author mentioned about the treatment of a European woman gets when she went to bazaars alone. This explained the freedom of security had been taken away. Since European had colonized Burma at that time, there was growing hatred toward European. Freedom to act also been seize when...
    433 Words | 1 Page
  • The Purpose of Narrative Form in Orwell and Angelou's Essyas
    The purpose of the narrative form in Angelou's and Orwell's essays Narrative writing is a written account of connected events. Writers choose the narrative form to inform, to explain, or simply to recount events that support a thesis. In Maya Angelou's essay, Finishing School, and George Orwell's essay, Shooting an Elephant, both writers use the form of narrative to tell a story yet their purpose is different. In the first, the author relied on dialogue and descriptive...
    639 Words | 4 Pages


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