Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution Essays & Research Papers

Best Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution Essays

  • Amendments of the United States Constitution
    Understanding the amendments of the United States Constitution is important because it explains our rights and duties as citizens. They are also important because having knowledge of the first ten amendments, if need be, can be used as an example in court. It strengthens the government and helps people to not be controlled by other people, for example a king or queen; so, independence is given as well to the people under the government in the United States. Appreciate your rights! The...
    1,251 Words | 3 Pages
  • the fourth amendment - 617 Words
    U.S. Constitution - Amendment 4 The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. Introduction The Fourth Amendment presents a host of interpretive issues: What is a search? What is a seizure? When is a search or...
    617 Words | 2 Pages
  • Fourth Amendment - 384 Words
     Wk. 1 Pt. 3 of 6 Jennifer Ontiveros CJCO2002 June 2, 2014 Everest College Wk. 1 Pt. 3 of 6 What is a case brief? A case brief is written by an attorney. It is a written document that supports the motions or any other court pleadings. Law student’s briefs on a case summarizes important information you need to know about a case. Elements of a case brief are: Facts-Who are the parties in the lawsuit, what is the dispute, and how did they get the case to the Supreme Court. In...
    384 Words | 2 Pages
  • Fourth Amendment - 466 Words
    In this essay I will be discussing The Fourth Amendment rights as they pertain to search and seizure, with and without warrants and why they are so important. The Fourth Amendment guarantees the right of the people to be secure by their persons, houses, papers and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated and no warrants shall be issued but upon probable cause. Supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly by describing the place to be searched...
    466 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution Essays

  • The Fourth Amendment - 2793 Words
    Abstract This paper will investigate the fourth amendment, unlawful search and seizure, and will explain what is considered to be unlawful and what is not. This paper will also discuss the right of privacy that Americans are entitled to as citizens of the United States. Events that have marked history in regards to the fourth amendment will also be explored, explaining the nature of searches and the key components that coincide. The court ruling in the historic case of Arizona vs. Gant will...
    2,793 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Fourth Amendment - 492 Words
    The Fourth Amendment The Fourth Amendment is Search and Arrest. This amendment assists and allows individuals to be safeguarded within his or hers homes, documents, and personal property, against unwarranted seizures and searches, the individual should not be intrude upon, warrants will not be issued, except reason for probable cause, assisted by Oath or declaration, and above all, defining the place to be investigated, and the individual or belongings to be seized ("Bill Of Rights And Later...
    492 Words | 2 Pages
  • Fourth Amendment Exceptions - 2977 Words
    The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution states that people have the right "to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures," but the issue at hand here is whether this also applies to the searches of open fields and of objects in plain view and whether the fourth amendment provides protection over these as well. In order to reaffirm the courts' decision on this matter I will be relating their decisions in the cases of Oliver v. United...
    2,977 Words | 8 Pages
  • The Right of People - the Fourth Amendment
    According to the Fourth Amendment, The right of people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, against unreasonable searches and seizures shall no be violated and no warrants shall issue, but upon reasonable cause supported by Oath or affirmation and particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized. Protection from unreasonable searches and seizures requires police, if they have time to obtain a valid search warrant, issued by a magistrate after...
    1,043 Words | 3 Pages
  • evolution of the fourth amendment - 373 Words
    “Evolution of the Fourth Amendment” Week Six Assignment Criminal Law By Robert Schmitz 10/13/2013 The fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution states that every person has the right to “be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects against unreasonable search and seizure.”(Brooks). However, this right was not always protected in court, criminal defendants would have to sit and watch as evidence was...
    373 Words | 2 Pages
  • The History and Significance of the Fourth Amendment
    THE HISTORY AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE FOURTH AMENDMENT "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." -Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution (4) A search as described in the...
    1,361 Words | 4 Pages
  • Unit 3 Fourth Amendment
     Robert Jones Unit 3 Assignment Fourth Amendment 1/13/2015 IS3350 Mr. Pragel The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution requires that no law enforcement official has the right to carry out search or seizure unless a warrant has been first issued by a judge. The exceptions are: searches with consent, frisks, plain feel/plain view, incident to arrest, automobile exceptions, exigent circumstances and open fields, abandoned property and public place exceptions (Harr,...
    413 Words | 2 Pages
  • Fourth and Fifth Amendment - 918 Words
    The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution reads: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized (The Free Dictionary 2013) In 1973, the Supreme Court case Cady v. Dombrowski created the “community caretaking...
    918 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Fourth Amendment: Search and Seizure
    Search and Seizure Tatiana Santos The Criminal Justice System CCJ 3024 Abstract The purpose of this assignment is to look in further to the rules and regulations, or rather; laws that police officials must abide by when executing their duties. These rules and regulations include search and arrest warrant in addition to protocol that the Courts oversee for public search and arrest. There are certain requirements that must be met by an officer in order to obtain a warrant. Such must...
    2,196 Words | 6 Pages
  • Fourth Amendment Essay - 860 Words
    Fourth Amendment Ashley J. Peterson Constitutional Law Steve Areges Kaplan University 1/13/2010 Fourth Amendment The Fourth Amendment is important not only to the citizens but for our law enforcement as well. The Fourth Amendment is still evolving today, as common and statutory laws change so does our Fourth Amendment. This amendment has come a long way and will continue to serve us in our best interests for as long as we live, whether we agree of disagree. “The right of the people...
    860 Words | 3 Pages
  • Weeks Vs United States
    Weeks vs United States By: Daven Baker Historic Background  the U.S. Supreme Court used the common law rule and permitted States and federal courts to admit evidence gained by an illegal search to convict an accused offender  Common law – judges decided whether evidence that had little to do with a case could be admitted  Fremont Weeks was arrested at his business, where officers searched the site without a warrant  Evidence collected from the illegal search was used to convict Weeks of...
    302 Words | 2 Pages
  • Searches: Crime and United States
    When the police use searches or surveillance techniques that raises Fourth Amendment concerns and initial question that must be answered is: Did the person claiming the protection of the Fourth Amendment have a reasonable expectation of privacy that was invaded by the police actions? Consider the following examples and explain whether you think the person has a reasonable expectation of privacy. A person who is a short-term guest at a friend's home objects to a warrantless entry by the police...
    537 Words | 2 Pages
  • United States and New Jersey
     New Jersey v. T.L.O. Questions INITIAL THOUGHTS: 1. When should the police have the right to search you or your property? - reasonable grounds to believe that a student possesses evidence of illegal activity or activity that would interfere with school discipline.” 2. When should a school employee have the right to search you or your belongings? - a school official may properly conduct a search of student’s person if the official has a reasonable suspicion that a crime has been...
    361 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Fourth Amendment: New Jersey vs. T.L.O.
    The Fourth Amendment to the constitution protects United States citizens from unreasonable searches and seizures. Our forefathers recognized the harm and abuses that occurred in the colonies to innocent people by the British, and they made sure to write protections into the U.S. Constitution. Fearing the police state that any nation has the potential to become and recognizing that freedom and liberty is meaningless when victimization by the police is a real and foreboding threat the Fourth...
    1,372 Words | 4 Pages
  • Fernandez V. California: Fourth Amendment Upheld?
    Fernandez v. California: Fourth Amendment Upheld? POL 303 August 4, 2013   The Merit case of Fernandez v. California is seeking to determine whether the Constitutional rights of Walter Fernandez were violated under the 4th Amendment when law enforcement conducted a search of his residence upon obtaining consent from his girlfriend, who was also a resident, after Fernandez was taken into custody (and had stated his objections to the search while at the scene). In Georgia v. Randolph...
    1,691 Words | 5 Pages
  • United States vs. Leon 1984
    Mink Johnson POLS 332i 11.15.12 United States vs. Leon 1984 U.S. Facts An informant told a police officer of Burbank, California, that Armando and Patsy Sanchez were selling drugs at their home and some at another location. Police then wanted to have an investigation on the two, since Sanchez had previously been in trouble with the law for marijuana use. Sanchez was thought to be was then linked to Richardo Del Castillo and Alberto Leon. A warrant was issued in the search of the drugs;...
    283 Words | 2 Pages
  • Unit 3 Assignment: Fourth Amendment Exceptions Summary
    The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution requires that no search or seizure shall be carried out unless a warrant has been issued. The exceptions are: searches with consent, frisks, plain feel/plain view, incident to arrest, automobile exceptions, exigent circumstances and open fields, abandoned property and public place exceptions (Harr, Hess, 2006, p. 219). Consent to search any property must be given by t actual owners or, as set forth in the United States v Matlock (1974) by a...
    310 Words | 1 Page
  • Law 260 Final Paper Fourth Amendment
    Patty Blanchard Intro to Law 12/4/12 Final Research Paper George Orwell warned us about this in his novel 1984; He claimed that by 1984, Big Brother would be able to watch our every move, and that day is essentially here. It is nice to know that there are laws and officials out there to protect citizens. They are essential to keeping everyone safe, and making sure criminals face justice, but it raises the question of how far are these officials able to go before they are unreasonably...
    2,519 Words | 7 Pages
  • New Jersey vs. T.L.O.: Fourth Amendment Rights
    Sonia Chaudery Period 5 November 17, 2014 New Jersey V. T.L.O. New Jersey v. T.L.O. (1985) was about a 14 year­old female T.L.O freshman getting caught smoking with a companion in a restroom at Piscataway High School by a teacher. Smoking was only allowed at designated areas at the school, not the restroom. When they were brought to the assistant vice principal, Theodore Choplick, to be questioned, T.L.O.’s ...
    756 Words | 1 Page
  • Fourth Amendment Issue: Bailey v US
    Bailey v. United States In this paper I will be discussing the case of Bailey v. United states. First we will be looking to see all the facts of this case to get a clear view of the issue at hand. Then we’ll cover what the issue is for this case, and why it would be an issue in accordance to the Fourth Amendment. I will make a stance in this paper about if I think the issue at hand is or isn’t a violation of the Fourth Amendment. The decisions of all the courts will be looked at, and...
    1,879 Words | 5 Pages
  • Dow Chemical Co. V United States
    Ermina Dedic Legal Brief 1 Name of Case: Dow Chemical Co. v United States. Court: U.S. Supreme Court Citation: 476 U.S. 227 (1986) Parties and their roles: Dow Chemical (Plaintiffs/Petitioner) and United States (Defendants/ Respondents) Facts: Dow Chemical operates a two-thousand-acre chemical plant at Midland, Michigan. The facility, with numerous buildings, conduits, and pipes, are visible from the air. Dow has maintained ground security at the...
    370 Words | 2 Pages
  • 4th Amendment - 2115 Words
    All Americans are entitled to their rights. The Fourth Amendment states that we the people have to deny search and seizures from law enforcement without a warrant. The fourth amendment generally prohibits police from entering a home without a warrant unless the circumstances fit an established exception to the warrant requirement. According to the book The Constitution: Our Written Legacy by Joseph A. Melusky, the Fourth Amendment gives the right of the people to be secure in their person,...
    2,115 Words | 5 Pages
  • 4th Amendment - 279 Words
    4th Amendment In the Constitution of the United States of America, the first 10 Amendments are called, “The Bill of Rights.” The fourth amendment states, “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” To this...
    279 Words | 1 Page
  • IV Amendment - 1871 Words
    IV Amendment The Constitution, through the Fourth Amendment, protects people from unreasonable searches and seizures by the government. The Fourth Amendment, however, is not a guarantee against all searches and seizures, but only those that are deemed unreasonable under the law. Whether a particular type of search is considered reasonable in the eyes of the law, is determined by balancing two important interests. On one side of the scale is the intrusion on an individual's Fourth...
    1,871 Words | 5 Pages
  • The 4th Amendment - 1070 Words
     The 4th amendment is the part of the bill of rights that protects personal privacy and every citizen’s right to be free of illegal government intrusion into their homes or property. Under law the protection of the 4th amendment extends to an officer’s physical apprehension, by way of the apparent arrest or criminal violation. The amendment also offers protection from police searches of places and property in which the person has a legitimate intention of privacy. The 4th amendment gives...
    1,070 Words | 3 Pages
  • 4rth Amendment - 6813 Words
    Opinion of Guan Yin SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES No. 11-817 STATE OF FLORIDA, Petitioner, v. CLAYTON HARRIS, Respondent. ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA Syllabus The case present before us involves the constitutionality of a dog sniff in regards to the 4rth Amendment. The respondent claims that the...
    6,813 Words | 18 Pages
  • 4th amendment - 347 Words
    Probable Cause: Probable cause is the legal standard by which a police officer has the right to make an arrest, conduct a personal or property search, or obtain a warrant for arrest. While many factors contribute to a police officer’s level of authority in a given situation, probable cause requires facts or evidence that would lead a reasonable person to believe that a suspect has committed a crime. Common examples of probable cause include the sight or smell of contraband in (plain view or...
    347 Words | 1 Page
  • The 4th Amendment - 633 Words
    • The 4th amendment is “the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” To me this means any law enforcement cannot enter or search your home or business and they cannot obtain any evidence without a warrant...
    633 Words | 3 Pages
  • 4th Amendment - 370 Words
    The 4th Amendment By Bryce Burtosky The 4th Amendment reads "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." The 4th Amendment idea that citizens should be protected from unreasonable searches and...
    370 Words | 2 Pages
  • Policing and the Constitution - 868 Words
    The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution states: Prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures and sets out requirements for search warrants based on probable cause. This amendment impacts law enforcement because police need a warrant to make arrests and searches. This is not applicable if the officer has first-hand knowledge of an event and the evidence is likely to be destroyed or the subject will abscond if time is taken to get a warrant. If a warrantless search is made by the...
    868 Words | 3 Pages
  • Philippine Constitution - 722 Words
    SECTION 1 You cannot be deprived of your life, liberty or property without any reason on their part and without giving an explanation or right be heard on your part on why you should not be deprive of your life, liberty or property. As regards to equal protection of the laws, it means the law applies to all, we are all protected by it, but we are all subjected to it once we violate its rules. Nobody shall be convicted without going through proper due process. SECTION 2 Before a police...
    722 Words | 3 Pages
  • Confessions and the Constitution - 667 Words
    Confessions and the Constitution Where the increasing amounts of technology are constantly aiding in finding criminals and suspects, nothing has proven to hold up in court better than a confession. Although, there are rules and regulations as to how these confession will be allowed to be admitted into court, just like in all things. These rules and regulations are defined pretty clearly in the fourth, fifth, and sixth amendments of the constitution. In the Fourth Amendment, it is said...
    667 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis of Article on 4th Amendment
    Review: " Suspect Searches: Assessing Police Behavior Under the U.S. Constitution" The article "Suspect Searches: Assessing Police Behavior Under the U.S. Constitution," by Gould and Mastrofski explores the police usage of unconstitutional searches. Unconstitutional searches are those that are in violation of the fourth amendment. The fourth amendment rights, along with certain case laws put forth the guidelines for legal stops, frisks, and searches. Gould and Mastrofski perform a direct...
    992 Words | 3 Pages
  • 4th Amendment in High Schools
    Introduction: March 7, 1980: two freshman girls in a New Jersey high school were caught smoking in the bathroom by a teacher. The teacher sent both girls to the principle's office since smoking in the bathroom was a violation of a school rule. Both girls were questioned by the Assistant Vice Principle, Theodore Choplick. In response to questioning by Mr. Choplick, one of the girls admitted that she was smoking in the bathroom. However, the other girl, T.L.O. denied that she had been smoking...
    4,997 Words | 12 Pages
  • 3 important amendments - 802 Words
    The Bill of Rights was a group of 10 amendments that were ratified to insure the new government did not have too much power and to make sure the citizens’ rights were protected. Of these 10 amendments, I feel there are 3 that stand out and are the most important. The 4th amendment, which prohibits unreasonable searches. The 5th amendment, which protects the right to a fair and speedy public trial by jury. And most importantly, the first amendment, which protects the freedom of speech and...
    802 Words | 3 Pages
  • Serarch of Students 4th Amendment
    Legal searches of students Phillip Burleson Western Carolina University I am sure that most people will agree that the safety of our children is of an upmost importance. Based on the events in the past decade like those of terrorism and the school shootings schools have taken a preventive approach and this can have a big impact on a schools day to day operation. When there is an issue that has come about we learn from it and prevent it from happening again. Many parents hold the school...
    1,799 Words | 5 Pages
  • 4th, 5th, and 6th amendment
    The Fourth Amendment protects the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, and provides that no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons to be seized. In order to establish probable cause, the officer must establish that there is a fair probability that the area to be searched contains...
    3,560 Words | 20 Pages
  • Criminal Justice amendments - 1459 Words
    A Different Perspective on the Law The United States has had an effective law enforcement system for hundreds of years, which has revolutionized itself starting with the implication of the Constitution to the lawless west and effectively to where it is today. The American criminal justice system has many branches and occupations, all of which focus on a common goal of keeping our nation as safe as possible. In the following paragraphs, I will discuss an interview with a San Diego Police...
    1,459 Words | 4 Pages
  • 4th Amendment Search & Seizure
    The Fourth Amendment is part of the Bill of Rights which was established in the seventeenth and eighteenth century English common law. Aside from the rest of the amendments in the Bill of Rights the Fourth Amendment can be traced back to a strong public reaction from some cases back in the 1760s. Two of these cases happened in England and one case happened in the colonies. These cases involved some pamphleteers who would pass out pamphlets to the public in order to spread their word around....
    1,527 Words | 4 Pages
  • CJ 101 4th Amendment
    To understand the impact of Terry v. Ohio, I feel it is important to first review the Fourth Amendment. The Fourth Amendment was established so citizens would not have to suffer unreasonable search and seizures like they did under British Rule. The Amendment states the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or...
    476 Words | 2 Pages
  • 4th amendment poaper - 1338 Words
    Hayell – al Morusi The fourth amendment states “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” The fourth Amendment is the one that guarantees freedom from...
    1,338 Words | 4 Pages
  • 4th Amendment rights - 408 Words
     Individual rights under the Fourth Amendment can make or break a case in trial. According to the Fourth Amendment, “the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” This is a United States...
    408 Words | 2 Pages
  • Philippine Constitution - Article Iii
    Article III Bill of rights - declaration and enumeration of a person’s right and privileges which the Constitution is designed to protect against violations Basis: social importance accorded to the individual in a democratic or republican state Classes of rights 1) Natural rights – right possessed by every citizen without being granted by the State for they are given to man by God Ex. Right to life, right to liability, right to property, right to love 2) Constitutional right –...
    2,562 Words | 10 Pages
  • 4th Amendment vs. Patriot Act
    Mohammad S. Chaudhry American Government 25-April-2012 Fourth Amendment vs. Patriot Act “Give me Liberty or give me death” by Patrick Henry It is dangerous world when you’re not safe in your own home. Thieves and robbers are not the suspects anymore; instead it’s the authorities that take their place in terrorizing your mind and body. The policing authorities have been given a free pass to do as they please to put fear in the nation’s eyes. With the implementation of acts such as...
    1,081 Words | 3 Pages
  • The 4th Amendment Right and Patriot Act
    4th Amendment and NYPD surveillance The United States has leaded the world as the dominant super power. Today many people around the world are wondering how did the United States come into existence and more importantly how has it been able to maintain its place as the most dominant nation. One thing which makes this country so great and contributes too many successful years is its democratic laws. Nobody wants a monarchy or a system which abuses the people without protection. The Founding...
    1,859 Words | 5 Pages
  • Common Law Origin of the Jourth Amendment
    COMMON LAW ORIGIN OF THE 4TH AMENDMENT As is the case with the majority of the legal pronouncements that comprise the Bill of Rights, the Fourth Amendment is based on the English common law that was extant in England in the 1600s and 1700s. In fact, the Fourth Amendment was directly inspired by three British legal cases – two of which were adjudicated in England and one that was tried in the American colonies in the 1760s. The two cases tried in England, Wilkes v. Wood (1763) and Entick...
    632 Words | 2 Pages
  • Supreme Court Case (4th Amendment)
    Alexis Crump Landmark Supreme Court Case: Washington V. Chrisman 11/29/9 Plaintiff: State of Washington Defendant: Chrisman Plaintiff’s Claim: The drugs that were collected in Chrisman’s dormitory room was legally obtained and could be used as evidence. Chief Lawyer for the Plaintiff: Ronald R Carpenter Chief Lawyer for the Defendant: Robert F Patrick Judges in Favor of the Court: Harry A. Blackmun, Sandra Day O’Connor, Lewis F. Powell, Jr., William H. Rehnquist and...
    690 Words | 5 Pages
  • Use of Thermal Imaging Devices and 4th Amendment Rights
    Angela Kelley’s article “Excuse Me, But Your House is Leaking,” discusses the new technologies of Thermal Imaging Devices (TIDs) and how they are impacting our Fourth Amendment right that protects us against invasion of privacy. The use of TIDs improperly opens the door to unreasonable searches and seizures. Because of the nature of the intrusion, TIDs somehow fall outside the letter of the law. However, do they fall outside the spirit in which the laws were originally crafted? This paper...
    514 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tlo vs. New Jersey: When Is the Constitution Invalid?
    TLO vs. New Jersey: When Is The Constitution Invalid? In the case of New Jersey vs. TLO, I rule in favor of the petitioner, the state of New Jersey. In this case, I found no reason in the claims made by TLO and her defense. They claimed that the search conducted by school officials was unconstitutional. These officials were searching her purse for cigarettes, which she was caught smoking in the bathroom. During the search for the cigarettes they found the cigarettes, rolling papers used...
    508 Words | 2 Pages
  • Irac Case Brief State V. Mcneely
    State v. McNeely 358 S.W.3d 65 MO. (2012) Facts: The defendant was stopped by a Missouri state highway patrolman for speeding and during this stop the trooper noticed that the defendant was displaying all the tell-tale signs of being intoxicated; blood shot eyes, slurred speech, and the smell of alcohol on his breath. This stop then changed from being a speeding stop to a DWI investigation. The trooper had the defendant get out of his truck and perform standard field sobriety tests. The...
    769 Words | 3 Pages
  • Voyles V. the State of Texas Court Case Summary
    In 2000, the Arlington Police Department received information stating that Earnest Leon Voyles had exchanged emails that contained sexual content with a fifteen year old girl from London, England. According to this informant the fifteen year old girl, “Amy Chang”, had been solicited for sex by Voyles and had arranged to meet with her in London to engage in a sexual relationship. Sergeant James Crouch of the Arlington Police Department was unsuccessful in contacting “Amy Chang” to verify the...
    703 Words | 2 Pages
  • Drones in America and How They Infringe on the 4th Amendment and Due Process of the Law
    Sheneta R. Ervin Constitutional Law II Dr. Jeffery Swain Florida Memorial University Drones In America And How They Infringe On The Fourth Amendment and Due Process Of The Law Abstract The purpose of this research paper is to show how unmanned aerial vehicles, better known as UAV’s or drones infringe on the Fourth Amendment and Due Process of the law. The Fourth Amendment states; ” the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects against...
    2,930 Words | 8 Pages
  • Search and Seizure - 2440 Words
    The constitution has been the back bone of the United States legal system since it was first written and signed by our founding fathers. This document has been the topic of many heat debates and has gone through many changes and interpretations throughout the years. The forth amendment of the constitution is one of the most debated amendments. This is the amendment that covers the area of search and seizure as well as privacy. The fourth amendment states, "The right of the people to be secure in...
    2,440 Words | 6 Pages
  • Media Discrimination Against African Americans
    Should the Exclusionary Rule Be Abolished? Should the exclusionary rule be abolished? My answer to that is no. The exclusionary rule is one of the fundamental ways the rights of the all people are protected. Mainly the rule is to protect you from police power. If the exclusionary rule was abolished you will more than likely see police brutality on the rise. Officer’s, Detectives, etc will cut corners and otherwise ignore the basic rights of the people they...
    1,501 Words | 5 Pages
  • Forensic Science - 2935 Words
    forensic science The word Forensic comes from the Latin forensus, meaning of the forum.1 In ancient Rome, the forum was where lawmaking debates were held, but it was also where trials were held just like modern day courthouses. From that, forensic science has come to mean the application of the natural and physical science to the motion of matters within a legal context2. Forensic Science can be viewed as a tripartite structure consisting of a Collection, which pertains to the science...
    2,935 Words | 8 Pages
  • Crim Outline - 29184 Words
    CRIMINAL PROCEDURE OUTLINE INTRODUCTION I. Meaning of “criminal procedure”: refer to the methods by which the criminal justice system functions including a. Arresting of suspects b. Searching of premises and persons c. The use of electronic surveillance and secret agents d. The interrogation of suspects e. The exclusionary rule II. Not all procedure is constitutionally regulated: Both states and federal legislatures are free to enact statutes and rules setting forth procedures...
    29,184 Words | 76 Pages
  • Vernonia School District V. Acton
    On June 26, 1995, the Supreme Court decided on the case Vernonia School District v. Acton as to whether or not random drug testing of high school athletes violated the reasonable search and seizure clause of the Fourth Amendment. During the 1980's and 1990's there was a large increase in drug use. The courts decision was a strong interpretation of the Fourth Amendment and the right decision upon drug testing high school athletes. Between 1985 and 1989 the Vernonia School District began to see...
    1,116 Words | 4 Pages
  • Employee Drug Testing (Violation of Constitutional Rights
    EDGEWOOD COLLEGE – BUSINESS LAW I Employee Drug Testing Violation of Constitutional Rights Judd, Jennah 9/18/2014 Introduction: The word "privacy" means many different things to different people. One widely accepted meaning, however, is the right to be left alone. The composers of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights embraced this meaning and it is referenced many times throughout both documents. This right is now under attack by Private employers who use the power of the paycheck to tell...
    2,482 Words | 9 Pages
  • Stop and Frisk - 1557 Words
     My name is _________ and I am here to bring attention to the “Stop and Frisk Laws” and how they affect our youth and damage our society. Also through this exchange of information I hope to show how these type of laws go against our constitutional rights. First let’s ask what does Stop and frisk actually mean legally? “It’s the situation in which a police officer who is suspicious of an individual detains the person and runs his hands lightly over the suspect's outer garments to determine...
    1,557 Words | 4 Pages
  • Current Event - 670 Words
    More than 90 percent of American adults own a mobile phone, and more than half of the devices are smartphones. But “smartphone” is a misnomer. They are personal computers that happen to include a phone function, and like any computer they can store or wirelessly retrieve enormous amounts of personal information: emails, photos and videos; document files; financial and medical records; and virtually everywhere a person has been. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will consider whether law...
    670 Words | 2 Pages
  • Missouri v McNeely - 483 Words
    Missouri v. McNeely (2012) I. Facts A Missouri police officer stopped Tyler McNeely after observing it exceeding the posted speed limit and repeatedly crossing the center line. The officer noticed McNeely’s bloodshot eyes, his slurred speech, and a smell of alcohol on his breath. McNeely performed poorly on a battery of field sobriety tests, and he declined to take a Breathalyzer test. When McNeely indicated he refuse a breath sample for testing, the officer took him to a nearby hospital...
    483 Words | 2 Pages
  • Midterm review - 21469 Words
    How To Brief a Case Facts: what happened? Procedure: what occurred in the lower courts? Decisions made in the lower courts (before the Supreme Court). Issue(s): question of law presented to the U.S. Supreme Court. Holding: the ruling in the case. The decision/answer. Rationale: reasons why the court ruled in a particular way. Rochin v. California Year: 1952 Facts 3 deputy sheriffs of the county of Los Angeles go into Rochin’s home after obtaining potential information...
    21,469 Words | 72 Pages
  • Search and Seizure: in Plain Smell
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