First Amendment to the United States Constitution Essays & Research Papers

Best First Amendment to the United States Constitution Essays

  • Amendments of the United States Constitution
    Understanding the amendments of the United States Constitution is important because it explains our rights and duties as citizens. They are also important because having knowledge of the first ten amendments, if need be, can be used as an example in court. It strengthens the government and helps people to not be controlled by other people, for example a king or queen; so, independence is given as well to the people under the government in the United States. Appreciate your rights! The...
    1,251 Words | 3 Pages
  • First Amendment to the United States Constitution and Freedom
    Writing 101 Definition Paper Fall 2012 Freedom “I want to be able to do what I want, when I want.” This is a common answer people give when asked what freedom means to them. If you ask anyone, whoever you ask will say they want to be free, but when asked to define what freedom means; they can’t give an exact definition. If someone says that freedom is having the ability to do whatever you want whenever you want, then would it be right for someone to use his or her free actions to hurt...
    1,225 Words | 4 Pages
  • Speech: First Amendment to the United States Constitution and Freedom
    Hook: How much do you value your freedom? How would you feel if where ever you go, there are always restrictions being made stopping you from doing or saying whatever you want, even if you had every single right to do so? (Back Ground Info) Claim: As young people our freedom of speech should not be limited because It is a natural right, we must be allowed our individuality, and what we do off campus should be our own personal business. 1) (Topic Sentence): Speech is God’s gift to...
    711 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ten Amendments: United States Constitution
    Amendment There are Ten Amendments ratified to the United States Constitution. These amendments are called and known as the “Bill of Rights”. The first amendment in the Bill of Rights talks about how the freedom of establish of religion, freedom of press, freedom of assembly right to petition, freedom of speech. They all have to do with people talking free in the United States and doing what they can with this amendment. The first part talks about the freedom of religion. In these case the...
    584 Words | 2 Pages
  • All First Amendment to the United States Constitution Essays

  • Profanity: First Amendment to the United States Constitution and Respondent Monetary Relief
    Profanity: The original meaning of “profanity” was restricted to blasphemy. “Blasphemy” was an offensive attack on religion and religious figures, which included swearing in the name of God. As centuries passed, profanity became more distinct from blasphemy. Although blasphemy still refers to language that defames God, a religion or a religious figure, profanity has evolved to include expressions with vulgar, racist and sexual themes. Used in a court case: Respondent public high school...
    928 Words | 3 Pages
  • First Amendment Is the Cornerstone of the United States of America
    First Amendment is the Cornerstone of the United States of America On July 4, 1776 the Declaration of Independence was signed freeing the thirteen American colonies from Great Britain, creating what would become the most powerful democratic country in history. The United States of America’s path to success is filled with trial, error, and countless sacrifices. The founding fathers envisioned a nation that was governed by the people not by a tyrannical king. On December 15, 1791 a...
    1,071 Words | 3 Pages
  • State of the First Amendment - 1059 Words
    State of the First Amendment Q1. As you may know, the First Amendment is part of the U.S. Constitution. Can you name any of the specific rights that are guaranteed by the First Amendment? In the First Amendment I can name three specific rights that are guaranteed by this Amendment. One of them is the Freedom of speech, the second is freedom of religion and lastly freedom is the press. Two of the freedoms that I could not name were the right to petition and the right of assembly. Most of the...
    1,059 Words | 3 Pages
  • The U.S. Constitution: RAPPS in the First Amendment
    U.S Constitution Essay Period 5/6 12/12/12 The freedom contain within the first amendment is the most important to me is the second P in RAPPS, which means R is for religious, A is for assemble, P is for press, P is for petition, and S is for speech. I say petition because it includes you and what you think. So do the other ones but a petition is for you. To create a more perfect union means to create a nation in which all the states work together. But with that it’s five more important...
    309 Words | 1 Page
  • The First Amendment - 291 Words
    Amendment One ------------------------------------------------- The Bill of Rights, founded by Thomas Jefferson, is a name for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. These amendments help to protect the natural rights of liberty and property. One of the most Important amendments is the first amendment. This amendment protects the freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and freedom of the press, as well as the right to assemble and petition the government. This...
    291 Words | 1 Page
  • First Amendment - 1388 Words
    The First Amendment and Its Conflict Freedom of speech, of religion, of the press, to assemble peacefully, and petition; this set of guarantees, protected by the First Amendment, comprises what we refer to as freedom of expression. However, many people will say that the law has stopped people from being able to exercise their rights. Personally I believe that people have lost their freedom to exercise their rights mentioned in the first amendment. Inhibiting a person’s right to exercise the...
    1,388 Words | 4 Pages
  • The First Amendment - 1954 Words
    The First Amendment The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is part of our countries Bill of Rights. The first amendment is perhaps the most important part of the U.S. Constitution because the amendment guarantees citizens freedom of religion, speech, writing and publishing, peaceful assembly, and the freedom to raise grievances with the Government. In addition, amendment requires that there be a separation maintained between church and state. Our first amendment to the United States...
    1,954 Words | 5 Pages
  • The First Amendment - 1212 Words
    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people to assemble peacefully, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The first and the most significant of the amendments to our Constitution is the First Amendment. "The amendment that established our freedoms as citizens of our new confederation." The First Amendment insures freedom of...
    1,212 Words | 4 Pages
  • The First Amendment - 599 Words
    First Amendment The First Amendment was written because at America's inception, citizens demanded a guarantee of their basic freedoms. The First Amendment protects the five basic freedoms that are essential to the American way of life. These freedoms are: the freedom of speech, the freedom of press, the freedom of assembly, the freedom of petition, and the freedom of religion. Freedom of speech allows you to say what is on your mind, in public or private places, without fear of getting...
    599 Words | 2 Pages
  • United States Constitution and the United States Legal System in Business Regulation.
    Government Regulation There have been various changes in government regulations over the last decade. Many people believe that the government interferes in the operations of businesses, and others feel as if there is not enough. The government has to regulate business, otherwise, anything goes. The economic functions of government tend to be viewed primarily as either public spending programs or revenue-generating activities that are used to pay for public spending. Another area in...
    538 Words | 2 Pages
  • First Amendment rights and students
    I am Afraid We Have Awakened a Sleeping Giant In many of today’s developed nations we take pride in the fact that it has become a standard for children growing up to attend school in order to receive a formal education. This monumental accomplishment is very new to human history that now there exists a global movement that believes that regardless of gender, race, or economic status everyone deserves the right to pursue an...
    2,348 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Evolution of the First Amendment - 996 Words
    The Evolution of the First Amendment The first amendment states, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.(encyclopedia) The inhabitants of the North American colonies did not have a legal right to express opposition to the British government that ruled them....
    996 Words | 3 Pages
  • The First Amendment and Its Impact on Education
    Checkpoint: The First Amendment and Its Impact on Education Lillian Jenkins August 31, 2012 Tonya Torrez The First Amendment of the United States is part of the Bill of Rights. The amendment prohibits the making of laws respecting an establishment of religion, the exercise of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of press, right to peaceably assemble, or petitioning for a government redress of grievances. The five key educational issues related to the first amendment and the first one is...
    278 Words | 1 Page
  • Section 1983--First Amendment
    Re: Brief of Appellant: 42 USC § 1983 Application to Employment Dismissal Case II. The District Court erred in disregarding Mason County District Attorney’s Office involvement with respect to the firing of Mr. Brady, an independent contractor, who was fired in retaliation to his comments criticizing the Mason County District Attorney’s Immigration policy, and in concluding that the Pickering test only protects full-time government employees. The District Court incorrectly held...
    897 Words | 3 Pages
  • Essential Restrictions on First Amendment
    Essential Restrictions on the First Amendment Limitations on freedoms of society are crucial, especially in America. As Roger Rosenblatt noted in his essay, “We Are Free to Be You, Me, Stupid and Dead,” many people express their freedom of speech in very offensive and controversial ways. Often their expressions violate other amendments and freedoms as well. A few examples given by Rosenblatt included acts of freedom of speech performed by professional sports players. Many believe these...
    377 Words | 2 Pages
  • First Amendment Issue - 1389 Words
    Jeremaiha McIntosh Greg Turner English1A 11/2/12 Our First Amendment Issue Being able to express one’s self is one of the most important rights of the people to maintain a connected society right to speech should be accepted to do so. The first amendment is one of the most fundamental rights that individuals have. It is fundamental to the existence of democracy and the respect of human dignity. This amendment describes the principal rights of the citizens of the United...
    1,389 Words | 4 Pages
  • First Amendment Paper - 1531 Words
    1 First Amendment Lynda Davis Hist/301 September 16, 2012 Nort Seever 2 The word “privacy” is not mentioned in the Constitution, although the Constitution does strongly imply the right to privacy. The right to privacy is evident in the first 10 amendments. The First Amendment protects the right to private individual worship regarding religion. Freedom of speech and freedom of press are also protected in the First Amendment. There have been many cases regarding the First...
    1,531 Words | 5 Pages
  • Amendments in the United Sates - 705 Words
    Amendments in the United Sates constitution have changed our government and our society. Amendments are usually ratified due to social events that occur over time .Ideologies also pay a considerable role to the ratification process as well. If it wasn't for political groups such as The Anti-Feudalist we may not have obtained the 1st amendment which sates "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of...
    705 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reflections on the First Amendment - 1858 Words
    Reflections on the First Amendment On December 15th, 1971, the first X amendments to the Constitution went into affect. The first X amendments to the constitution were known as the Bill of Rights. The First Amendment was written by James Madison because the American people were demanding a guarantee of their freedom. The First Amendment was put into place to protect American’s freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of assembly and freedom of petition. The First Amendment was written as...
    1,858 Words | 5 Pages
  • First Amendment and the Freedom of Expression
    First Amendment Question In modern times we view America as a thriving nation at the top of the power rankings amongst countries. Such supremacy is found not through the weapons of mass destruction but instead in the people living in a free society. The idea of free society can be related to the first amendment found in the constitution which enforces the idea of freedom. The first amendment is vital to functioning of a free society. Justice Robert Johnson once said, “No official can...
    1,040 Words | 3 Pages
  • First Amendment Paper - 1399 Words
    First Amendment Paper The First Amendment is part of the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights is our rights as citizens living in the United States of America. In this paper I will look at three provisions to the First Amendment, highlighting one case for each provision. Included are one case to discuss freedom of speech, one case to discuss separation of church and state and one case to discuss freedom of association. 1.) Discuss at least one Supreme Court case of significance related to...
    1,399 Words | 4 Pages
  • The First and Second Amendment - 1029 Words
    The First and Second Amendment When the Constitution was written, it was not the intent of the authors to assure human rights to its citizenry, it was written in order to set up a federal government that would allow the United States to be a self-governing entity, and to put in place a system of government that would serve the citizens of the country in the way that they saw fit. After the ratification of the Constitution in 1787, “people soon began to notice that it did not list many...
    1,029 Words | 3 Pages
  • Reflections on the First Amendment Paper
    Reflections on the First Amendment Paper Ephraim Iivula HIS/301 May 29, 2011 Kenneth Johnston University of Phoenix Reflections on the First Amendment According to the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble,...
    1,615 Words | 5 Pages
  • First Amendment Persuasive Essay
    Jenica Situ Period 3, History Bill of Rights – Persuasive Essay Of all the Amendments we have, there are 10 main ones. Out of the ten main ones, I personally believe that the First Amendment is the most important one. There is a reason why this amendment is so important. The reason this amendment is so important because it protects the freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition. One of the freedoms the First Amendment protects is religion. Freedom of religion supports...
    473 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reflections on the First Amendment - 1202 Words
    Reflections on the First Amendment Megan Cresse His/301 June 18, 2013 Karen Levosky Reflections on the First Amendment The First Amendment is one of the most important Amendments in the Bill of Rights. The forefathers felt that the Bill of Rights was needed in the Constitution to assure the rights of the people and proceeded to add such protection in the First Amendment. Presently and throughout history the First Amendment stands as an important role in America. Many believe it is the...
    1,202 Words | 4 Pages
  • Schenck V. United States
    Legal Brief 10/24/11 Citation: Charles T. Schenck v. United States, Supreme Court of the United States, 1919 Issue: Whether distributing anti-conscription literature during war time is protected under the First Amendment. Relief Sought: Schenck did not want to be convicted of violating the Espionage Act of 1917 so he appealed to the United States Supreme Court. Facts: Charles Schenck was the general secretary of the Socialist Party of America. Socialists believed that the war had been...
    541 Words | 2 Pages
  • United States vs. ALA
    COURT CASE: ALA vs. CIPA (may be United States vs ALA) Argued March 5, 2003 Decided June 23, 2003 CASE SUMMARY: In this case the American Library Association (ALA) challenged in court the constitutionality of the Child Internet Protection Act (CIPA) enacted in 2000, saying that it violated the First Amendment. In this lawsuit ALA sued to overturn the requirement that libraries restrict patrons’ access to computer information, that if Internet filters were not installed, federal funding and...
    461 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chick-Fil-a First Amendment Controversy
    Chick-Fil-A First Amendment Controversy The Wall Street Journal article written by Jack Nicas titled “First Amendment Trumps Critics of Chick-fil-A” overviews the hotly debated topic of Chick-Fil-A and it’s CEO Dan Cathy’s comment that he supports “the biblical definition of a family unit”. His comments have sparked outrage, assertions of bigotry, a record revenue day, millions of social media postings, hundreds of thousands of protestors, and even comments from mayors in Chicago and Boston...
    691 Words | 2 Pages
  • Susan Jocoby: The First Amendment and Censorship
    Jacoby then argues that pornography can hardly be deemed more offensive than Nazism, which is also protected by the First Amendment. Next, Jacoby takes on the argument that the First Amendment is refuted by kiddie porn by submitting that kiddie porn is an issue of child abuse, not the First Amendment. Also, she counters the argument made by feminists that censorship of pornography is more sensible than other forms of censorship, by pointing out that some nude depictions are attractive to some...
    749 Words | 2 Pages
  • First Amendment Paper Essay Example
    The First Amendment Freedom is being breached all over the U.S and most of it is being taken away from the press. Sure the Patriot Act is killing everyone's privacy in secrecy all over the US, but journalists and reporters are being put in jail right and left. The government has infringed on their rights in a way that should not be with the first amendment. It seems like the more people let the government do, the more steps the government takes to take first amendment rights from people....
    1,386 Words | 4 Pages
  • Us Bill of Rights " First Amendment"
    Mary Cathleen ThomasUnited States GovernmentGovt-2305-54245Jinnell Killingsworth | U.S. Bill of Rights | “Amendment I” | | | 2/19/2011 | | “The First Amendment” In the beginning, our founding fathers where working on drafting a formal Constitution for our newly formed country. The representatives for some of the newly formed states, worried about the current draft of the Constitution. Many of the states and there representatives, had concerns about the wording of the...
    1,740 Words | 5 Pages
  • "A First Amendment Junkie" by Susan Jacoby.
    A Female for the First. Although a very respected female journalist, Susan Jacoby was labeled as a "First Amendment junkie" by many other women for her personal views concerning the censorship of pornography in society. Ultimately, she believed that censorship of any kind against pornography was wrong. Feminists were infuriated that another female acknowledged pornography's right to exist. Susan Jacoby did not necessarily agree with pornography, but she felt that its rights guaranteed under the...
    518 Words | 2 Pages
  • First Amendment Rights in Public Schools
    In 1789, James Madison first proposed a set of documents that gave certain inalienable rights to Americans. On December 15, 1791 the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified and became known as the Bill of Rights. The First Amendment of the Constitution is the most sacred to Americans. It says that, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right...
    2,102 Words | 6 Pages
  • Schenck vs. United States (1919)
    SCHENCK VS. UNITED STATES (1919) The Schenck court case of 1919 developed out of opposition to U.S. involvement in World War I (1914-1918). Antiwar sentiment in the United States was particularly strong among socialists, German Americans, and religious groups that traditionally supported antiviolence. In response to this outlook, Congress passed the Espionage Act of 1917. This law provided heavy fines and jail terms for interfering with U.S. military operations or for...
    440 Words | 2 Pages
  • Schenck v. United States 1919
    Political Science Name: rsonam Donohue Briefs #2 Tuesday, March 5 Schenck v. United States 1919 Criminal Case Federal Petitioner: Schenck Respondent: United States Events: During World War I in 1917, Congress had passed a law called the Espionage Act which states that during wartime obstructing the draft and trying to make soldiers disloyal or disobedient were crimes. Schenck going against the war, mailed...
    400 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Constitutionality of Yates vs. United States
    Foster Zinn Team History 4/4/2013 The Constitutionality of Yates v. United States The case Yates v. United States was asking if the Smith Act was a violation of the First Amendment. Fourteen leaders of the Communist Party were sent to court for violating the Smith act. Yates argued that he was protected by the First Amendment. The Smith act was made to set criminal penalties for planning the overthrow of the government. The dissent was Yates had the protection of the First Amendment. The...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • United States V. Lee (1982)
    United States v. Lee (1982) This case involved a conflict between the beliefs of the Old Order Amish and government regulations on employment and Social Security. The Amish regard the care of the sick and elderly to be one of their religious obligations; as a consequence, they believe that paying Social Security taxes (designed to care for the sick and elderly) would entail acknowledging that the government had that task rather than they. Thus, paying Social Security taxes would mean denying...
    426 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Infringement of the First Amendment in High School Theatre
    In the landmark case Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), John Tinker and his siblings decided to openly protest the Vietnam War by wearing black armbands to school (Goldman 1). The school felt that their efforts to protest the war disrupted the school environment. “The Supreme Court said that ‘in our system, undifferentiated fear or apprehension of disturbance is not enough to overcome the right to freedom of expression.’ School officials cannot silence student...
    1,305 Words | 4 Pages
  • The First Amendment to the U.S Constitution Is a Progressive Legislation, According to Many Observers. It Should Be Incorporated Into Domestic Law.
    THE FIRST AMENDMENT TO THE U.S CONSTITUTION IS A PROGRESSIVE LEGISLATION, ACCORDING TO MANY OBSERVERS. IT SHOULD BE INCORPORATED INTO DOMESTIC LAW. The United States of America has one of the world's powerful systems of legal fortification for freedom of the press. The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution provides the foundation assurance of press freedom and freedom of speech. In this essay I will be keen on highlighting the significance of the First Amendment and relating its motive of...
    1,748 Words | 5 Pages
  • Censorship and the First Amendment: the American Citizen's Right to Fr
    Censorship and the First Amendment: The American Citizen's Right to Free Speech Are we protected from censorship under the First Amendment? In other words do individuals or groups have the right or the power to examine material and remove or prohibit anything they consider objectionable? This argument has been progressing for centuries, in fact the first notable case was against John Peter Zenger, in 1743. Zenger was an editor of a New York colonial newspaper that often published articles...
    1,862 Words | 6 Pages
  • The First Amendment and Its Impact on Education Essay Example
    The First Amendment and its Impact on Education Patricia Thomas AED/204 Gail Cargile November 4, 2010 Battle over Pledge Arguments over the Pledge and specifically over the phrase “under God,” have caused people to wonder about the First Amendment...
    648 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rap Lyrics Should Rap Songs Be Protected by the First Amendment? Yes, Song Lyrics Are Protected Under the Constitution. the First Amendment Is Considered the Backbone of American Freedom However, It Is Important You
    RAP LYRICS Should rap songs be protected by the first amendment? Yes, song lyrics are protected under the Constitution. The First Amendment is considered the backbone of American freedom however, it is important you understand that the rights guaranteed in The Bill of Rights are relative, not absolute. That means our guarantees of freedoms (including song lyrics) can be restricted if subjected to clarification by the Supreme Court. Should people be allowed to say and or write anything...
    267 Words | 1 Page
  • First Amendment and Music Censorship Essay Example
    The First Amendment to the Bill of Rights exists because the Founders of our country understood the importance of free expression. The First Amendment states "Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press . . ." (Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution 17). One of the ways the American people use this freedom of speech and expression is through the creation of the art form known as music. Music's verbal expression bonds our society...
    1,324 Words | 4 Pages
  • Discussing Three Freedoms from the First Amendment
    Today I will be discussing three freedoms from the first amendment. I will identify how these freedoms have developed in our society. You will also hear a few of my own personal experiences that I have had regarding these freedoms. The first amendment states : “congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise there of, or abridging the freedom of speech; or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the...
    341 Words | 1 Page
  • Does the first Amendment affect your livelihood?
    Does the first Amendment affect your livelihood? Hmmm...I'm not sure...Is water wet? Is the grass green? Do skittles come in different colors? Do we even really need to ask? Of course it does....The first Amendment is important for a lot of reasons, one being that it allows us to show our individuality and uniqueness. If we weren't allowed to express ourselves, be it in writing dancing, comedy, and many other ways, then our individuality and uniqueness would never be seen. We might as well be...
    832 Words | 3 Pages
  • Legal: Supreme Court of the United States and Correct Answer
    Leg 500 Midterm Question 1 5 out of 5 points The best example of a source for virtue ethics for a business is Answer Selected Answer: the corporate mission statement. Correct Answer: the corporate mission statement. Question 2 5 out of 5 points Corporate director or officer decisions to dedicate corporate funds for social causes is called: Answer Selected Answer: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Correct Answer: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Question 3 5...
    2,104 Words | 9 Pages
  • Dow Chemical Co. V United States
    Ermina Dedic Legal Brief 1 Name of Case: Dow Chemical Co. v United States. Court: U.S. Supreme Court Citation: 476 U.S. 227 (1986) Parties and their roles: Dow Chemical (Plaintiffs/Petitioner) and United States (Defendants/ Respondents) Facts: Dow Chemical operates a two-thousand-acre chemical plant at Midland, Michigan. The facility, with numerous buildings, conduits, and pipes, are visible from the air. Dow has maintained ground security at the...
    370 Words | 2 Pages
  • United States of American: Personal Freedom Essay Example
    United States of American: Personal Freedom No other democratic society in the world permits personal freedoms to the degree of the United States of America. Within the last sixty years, American courts, especially the Supreme Court, have developed a set of legal doctrines that thoroughly protect all forms of the freedom of expression. When it comes to evaluating the degree to which we take advantage of the opportunity to express our opinions, some members of society may be guilty of...
    2,731 Words | 10 Pages
  • Walz vs. New York: Violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment
    Student #2 U.S. Government B3 Section 1: Overview In November of 1969, Frederick Walz, owner of property in Richmond County, New York, sued the New York City Tax Commission on the grounds that property tax exemptions for religious organizations (i.e. Churches, Synagogues) indirectly forced him to support said organizations. The case, Walz v. Tax Commission of City of New York, addressed the issue of if property tax exemptions violated the Establishment Clause of the first amendment. The...
    1,095 Words | 4 Pages
  • Should Racist Speech Enjoy Protection Under the First Amendment? Example
    Persuasive Speech - Should Racist Speech Enjoy Protection under the First Amendment? Prejudice and racial stereotyping are two of this country's greatest problems today. Many people in our society have tried to find ways to eliminate or at least limit these types of behavior, but have met with very limited, if any, success. Because of the complex nature of racism and racist acts, coupled with the fact the first amendment prohibits the government from limiting the publics' right to free...
    1,559 Words | 5 Pages
  • 27 Amendments - 539 Words
    The 27 Amendments to the Constitution have had a profound impact on our country. Although all of the Amendments have had a direct effect on the citizens of the United States, there are three amendments that stand out above all of the others due to their impact and significance. The three amendments to the Constitution that I think are the most important to the American people are Amendments one, two, and four. #1 Freedom of Speech is to help people speak and write freely without any punishment....
    539 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1st Amendment - 422 Words
    I think the most important Amendment of all time would be the first Amendment. This freedom of religion, speech, assembly, and politics allows our country to be unique and protects our rights as American citizens. There are many current day issues that are driven by the first amendment. My first example I would like to talk about would be the anti-war movement. The first amendment allows we the people to protest and voice our opinions. Cindy Sheehan pleads with Bush for a meeting and accuses him...
    422 Words | 2 Pages
  • Amendment 1 - 403 Words
    The First Amendment protects the rights of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, and the right to petition the Government. These rights are some of the most important rights granted to Americans. Some may argue that the First Amendment is too protective of our rights. I tend to disagree; I think in order for our country to have a written explanation of what is or isn't protected the First Amendment gets the points across precisely. The First Amendment grants Americans the...
    403 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1st Amendment - 896 Words
    The First Amendment The First Amendment is, in many people's eyes, considered the most important amendment in the United States Constitution. It protects the rights to freedom of religion, freedom of expression, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly and freedom of press from government interference. Basically, the amendment gives people the ability to live their lives the way that they want to, with the lifestyle that they choose. If people don't like what they hear, they...
    896 Words | 3 Pages
  • Amendment Essay - 385 Words
    Amendment Essay Thomas Jefferson once claimed, “A democracy cannot be both ignorant and free.” This is why I believe that the first amendment is the most important amendment to the American people. It states that we have the freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly and petition; meaning, we are allowed to voice our opinions, choose what religion we want to follow. As people, we have natural rights, meaning God given rights that the government cannot take away from us. These include...
    385 Words | 2 Pages
  • 2nd Amendment. - 1259 Words
    Introduction For more than a century, the 2nd Amendment has been at the forefront of political upheaval. Great politicians and lawyers such as, Joseph story, speaking on the preamble of the 2nd amendment, stating that the “true office” of the preamble “is to expound the nature and extent, and application of the powers actually conferred by the constitution, and to substantively create them” § 462 (F.B. Rothman 1991) (1833). What Story meant by this was that the preamble to the constitution...
    1,259 Words | 4 Pages
  • Supreme Court Case of Dennis V. United States, 1951
    For nearly five years, the United States and Great Britain allied with the Soviet Union to defeat the Axis Powers, during World War II. During the war, the usual tensions between the West and the Soviets took a back seat to their mutually convenient alliance. Tensions gradually resurfaced after Germany's defeat, and the Cold War was born. As the Soviets extended their influence by promoting and installing communist governments in the countries of Eastern Europe, a so-called iron curtain...
    1,200 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Best Amendment - 367 Words
    Which Amendment? The freedom of speech, religion and press seems like an everyday activity, right? But imagine if you were not allowed to speak your opinion or practice your choice of religion, or even write about facts or opinions that interest you. What if you had to keep all your thoughts and opinions to yourself except for the ones that you were allowed to express or you would be in trouble. That would be like torture. That is why Amendment number one of the Constitution is the most...
    367 Words | 1 Page
  • Dennis V. United States, 341 U.S. 494 (1951)
    Facts: The petitioners, the leaders of the Communist Political Association (CPA), reorganized the Association into the Communist Party through changing its policies of peaceful cooperation with the United States and its economic and political structure to into the Marxist-Leninist doctrine of the Communist Party. The Communist Party set itself apart from other political parties by disregarding the normal process of change set forth by the constitution. From the literature, statements, and...
    626 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1st Amendment - 755 Words
    Darius henry The First Amendment In my opinion freedom of speech and First Amendment rights are crucial to higher education because For One, Freedom of speech is the right for an individual to speak their mind without interfering with the law and the First Amendment is the law respecting an establishment of religion , the right to free expression, infringing on the freedom of the press, and freedom of belief. Which all ties into education itself sine the majority of it is sourly based...
    755 Words | 2 Pages
  • The First Ammendment - 767 Words
     The First Amendment How did/does technology affect objectivity? How do multiple developments in technology effect society and challenge a journalists’ ability to communicate. Correlate speed (in any epoch/era) and the profound affect it makes on the need for First Amendment privileges. On September 25, 1789 the First Amendment was submitted to the states for ratification in order to fix the Constitution that lacked guarantees for civil liberties. On December 15, 1791, it was...
    767 Words | 3 Pages
  • Citizens United - 997 Words
    Almost a century ago, back to the time when the modern corporation was created, sprung the Progressive era that flourished with political reforms and social activism. Along with the corporations also came laws that have always prohibited or limited the use of corporate money in elections as a result of Progressive reform’s efforts to eliminate social and political problems, especially corruption. These specific laws have been in place up until January 21, 2010 during the landmark case Citizens...
    997 Words | 3 Pages
  • first am - 783 Words
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