Ethology Essays & Research Papers

Best Ethology Essays

  • Ethology - 303 Words
    Ethology....

Ethology (from Greek: ethos meaning "character"; and logia, meaning "the study of") is the scientific and objective study of animal behaviour. 
The focus of ethology is on animal behaviour under natural conditions, as opposed to behaviourism, which focuses on behavioural response studies in a laboratory setting.
 In the study of aggression by ethologists, as it relates to the interaction and evolution of animals in natural settings. In such studies , it revealed that...
    303 Words | 1 Page
  • Ethology and Animals - 2079 Words
    Ethology: A Study in Animal Behavior and the Complexity of Their Action A Study in Animal Behavior Hierarchy Among Animal Species Ethology, the study of animal behavior is still a new frontier for scientists (Freedman, 1970). Ethology, a combination of evolution, ecology, physiology, genetics and psychology, has just come about within the last two decades (Raven, 1999). Animals are a vital component in the history of the world. For instance, the Bible mentions some 100 kinds of...
    2,079 Words | 6 Pages
  • Konrad Lorenz: The Scientist of Ethology
    Konrad Lorenz Konrad Lorenz was well known as a scientist in the field of ethology, and his field in the study of animal behavior shaped society today. His theories and discoveries in his life were a breakthrough in the field of ethology, but examining the factors that affected his life like his family, work, and even his dog played an important role in his work. Lorenz and other scientist popularize the study and function of animal behavior and instinct. Lorenz’s research focused the...
    1,915 Words | 6 Pages
  • biological factors of the environment - 989 Words
    AP Biology Reading Guide Fred and Theresa Holtzclaw Chapter 51: Animal Behavior Name___________________________ Period___________ Chapter 51: Animal Behavior Overview 1. How is behavior defined? Concept 51.1 Discrete sensory inputs can stimulate both simple and complex behaviors 2. What is ethology? 3. What is the difference between proximate and ultimate causation? 4. Using red-crowned cranes, what is an example of a proximate causation question and an example...
    989 Words | 9 Pages
  • All Ethology Essays

  • AP Bio Chapter 51
    AP Biology Name: Chapter 51 Guided Reading 1. How do behavioral ecologists define behavior? Behavioral ecologists define behavior as everything an animal does and how it does it 2. What is the focus of: a. Proximate questions of behavior? Focuses on the environmental stimuli, if any, that trigger a particular behavioral act, as well as the genetic, physiological, and anatomical mechanisms underlying it. b. Ultimate questions of behavior? Focuses on the evolutionary...
    1,506 Words | 5 Pages
  • Animal Behavior Lab - 333 Words
    I. Title Laboratory 11. Animal Behavior II. Purpose The purpose of the animal behavior lab was to understand the concept of distributing organisms in a resource gradient. This lab was also made to help us differentiate between kinesis and taxis. After completing the animal behavior lab, we should be able to describe aspects of animal behavior as far as its orientation behavior, agonistic behavior, dominance display, and the way it mates or who it chooses to mate with. We should also...
    333 Words | 2 Pages
  • Douglas Spalding - 267 Words
    Douglas Spalding Douglas Spalding was the architect of ethology, the scientific study of animal behavior. He started his research in the mid 1800s. His studies discounted British empiricist claims that animal skill regarding depth, distance; perception and sound localization were learned by the animals while they were young. Spalding study of ethology involved the determiner of behavior such as instinct is behavior that is predisposed or shaped by natural selection or innate pre-programmed...
    267 Words | 1 Page
  • Phsychological Imprinting - 888 Words
    Psychological Imprinting: How does it work? Have you ever met a person who has raised a non-domesticated animal as a pet? It would seem that this relationship would not work out between these two very different species. It is possible though for this animal and human coexist with this relationship and circumstances through the psychological process of imprinting. Imprinting is a specialized type of programmed learning that can be seen in higher animal species (Wikipedia, 2002). When...
    888 Words | 3 Pages
  • PSY 301 Week 4 DQ1
    In this file of PSY 301 Week 4 Discussion Question 1 Altruism and Prosocial Behavior you will find the next information: Examine the concept of altruism and altruistic behavior. What does it mean for someone to behave altruistically? What is gained from this action, and how does it differ from egoistic behavior? What are some reasons why people would want to help one another, without regard for personal gain or benefit? In addition, explain the bystander effect. If we all have a genuine...
    494 Words | 2 Pages
  • College Work - 1060 Words
    Bibliography http://prezi.com/h3-_2e4qtizm/bonding-and-imprinting/ http://departments.weber.edu/chfam/1500/bonding.htm http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090318063346AAIRB74 http://pets-animals.blurtit.com/283608/what-is-imprinting-and-bonding-important-in-the-animal-kingdom http://www.canidae.com/blog/2012/05/how-close-do-pets-bond-with-each-other.html http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/stories/6-animals-with-pets-of-their-own...
    1,060 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mumbai University Zoology Syllabus
    Academic Council 25/05/2011 Item No. 4.59 UNIVERSITY OF MUMBAI Syllabus for the F.Y.B.Sc. Program: B.Sc. Course : Zoology (Credit Based Semester and Grading System with effect from the academic year 2011–2012) 1 F.Y.B.Sc. Zoology Syllabus Restructured for Credit Based and Grading System To be implemented from the Academic year 2010-2011 SEMESTER I Course Code UNIT I USZO101 II III I USZO102 II III USZO P1 TOPICS Diversity of Animal Kingdom I Life processes I Ecology Molecular...
    3,288 Words | 12 Pages
  • Animal Have Feelings - 2103 Words
    Nicholas Destino Professor Thomas English 101 10 November 1997 Do Animals Have Emotions? Somewhere in the savannas of Africa a mother elephant is dying in the company of many other pachyderms. Some of them are part of her family; some are fellow members of her herd. The dying elephant tips from side to side and seems to be balancing on a thin thread in order to sustain her life. Many of the other elephants surround her as she struggles to regain her balance. They also try to help by...
    2,103 Words | 6 Pages
  • Imprinting - 2288 Words
    Imprinting describes a process in which newborn animals rapidly develop a strong attachment to a particular individual, often the mother. It is associated particularly with precocious bird species (species that mature early) such as chickens, ducks, and geese, in which the young hatch fairly well-developed. Imprinting is advantageous because once offspring imprint on their mother, they will try to remain close to her and follow her around, behaviors that are beneficial in terms of the...
    2,288 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Evolutionary Theory of Attachment - 658 Words
    The Evolutionary Theory of Attachment Bowlby's evolutionary theory consists of a number of essential factors. The evolutionary theory of attachment as proposed by John Bowlby (1907-1990) suggests that attachment, in terms of adaptation, is essential for survival. In order to progress healthily, children are born with an innate tendency to form attachments. This means that infants are pre-programmed to become attached to their caregiver. This is supported by the research of Lorenz (1952)...
    658 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animal behavior - 303 Words
    An animals behavior is its response to external and internal stimuli Ethology is the scientific study of animal behaviour, particularly in natural environments. Behavioral ecology is the study of the ecological and evolutionary basis for animal behavior A fixed action pattern is a sequence of unlearned, innate behaviors that is unchangeable - red stickle back fish Oriented movement- environmental cues can trigger movement in a particular direction Kinesis- simple change in...
    303 Words | 2 Pages
  • psychology - 365 Words
    Unit 1: Instinct and Culture Find examples to illustrate instinctive behaviour in animals. Dolphins swimming instantly after being born. Birds knowing where to migrate to. Bears knowing when to hibernate. Adult female mammals nurturing newborn offspring. Spider spindling its web. Dog shaking after it gets wet. Sea turtle seeking the ocean after hatching. Instincts are patterns of behaviour that are not the result of learning or experience. Reproduction, migration and...
    365 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Goodall - 725 Words
    Jane Goodall Jane Goodall is one of the world’s most admired women, acclaimed scientist, and conservationist (www.nationalgeographic.com). The work that she does is called ethology, which is the study of animal behavior. Such a successful woman has numerous admirable qualities. She has contributed greatly to society as well as to the animal kingdom. Her research paved the way for countless primate studies, and has changed the way many people view chimpanzees. Trying to narrow down only...
    725 Words | 3 Pages
  • Animal Behaviour - 368 Words
    The fascinating world of animal behaviour- science essay Animals and their behaviour has been fascinating to behold and even more incredible to experience. Humans have been intrigued at how the most basic creatures can do the most complex things. Ethology or the scientific study of animal behaviour is responsible for numerous breakthroughs in the understanding of the animal world, and in turn the human one. Animal behaviour can range from being altruistic, to funny, to being lessons in teamwork...
    368 Words | 1 Page
  • Jack: Almost the Hero of Lord of the Flies
    Jack, leader of a group of choirboys and ultimately chief of the hunters, is Ralph's principal antagonist. Described as having a full head of red hair, wearing a black cloak and bullying his way through the boys, his role as a villain is fairly clear from the beginning. Jack is destined to be the primary cause of destruction on the island; however, he is not presented as a one-dimensional monster. Golding forges a more complex and subsequently more credible character than that. Jack does,...
    361 Words | 2 Pages
  • innate vs learned behaviour
    Q: In your own words, details the ‘for’ and ‘against’ arguments with regard to innate and learned behaviour. A: There are two types of behaviour, innate and learned. Innate behaviour (also known as nature) is defined as natural and instinctive. It is the behaviour present at birth, the fixed, unchanging behaviours.Nativists believe that various aspects of behaviour are innate. They argue that behaviour is due to genetics as we inherit the qualities that decide the kind of person we will be....
    658 Words | 2 Pages
  • THE AP EURO DBQ - 555 Words
    Instructions for AP BIOLOGY Investigation 12-Fruit Fly Behavior *We will be using Roly-polies (Armadillidium vulgare) to study animal behavior instead of fruit flies. They are members of a family of woodlice in the order Isopoda that are able to roll into a ball. When writing up this lab, substitute A. vulgare or “roly-poly” or “pillbug” for Drosophila melanogaster throughout. **You still have to know the basics of fruit fly behavior, so be sure to read the lab carefully and save the lab...
    555 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Effects of Uncertainty on Social Food Preference Among Rats
    The Effects of Uncertainty on Social Food Preference Among Rats Brittany Hiben Radford University Author Note This paper is being submitted to Dr. Willner on 12/08/11 in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Psychology 434 Research in Learning. The Effect of Uncertainty on Social Food Preferences in Long-Evans Rats The present study investigates the effects of uncertain environments on social food preferences among male Long-Evans rats. Exposure to an uncertain environment that...
    1,774 Words | 5 Pages
  • Can Animals Demonstrate Intelligence
    Saeed Reading & Writing level 2 Essay Final Draft 8/1/2010 Can Animals Demonstrate Intelligence, or Do They Just Act on Instinct? Animals' behaviors can be recognized as a complicated process in animals' lives circles which includes a mixture between instinct and intelligence. The way that most of animals use to communicate with each other is a clear sample to know how much complicated they are. Most differences between animals' behaviors may relate to their intelligence such as...
    462 Words | 2 Pages
  • CH 43 Review Assessment
    CH 43 - Review Assessment Date: 1/26/15 Score for this attempt: 72 out of 100 Submitted Jan 26 at 2:11pm This attempt took 108 minutes. IncorrectQuestion 1 0 / 4 pts Which form of communication is used by social insects to modify the behavior of the colony? Which form of communication is used by social insects to modify the behavior of the colony? Chemical communication Visual communication Auditory communication None of the choices are used by social insects. All of...
    1,599 Words | 13 Pages
  • Professional Development Plan - 328 Words
    I am applying to study animal behaviour and welfare as I understand it to be a fast growing and hugely exciting field, not just in it's scope and applications within the more traditional animal industries, but also in it's implications for ecology and the human animal experience. My particular area of interest is in ethology, and I am gripped by the idea of 'studying an animal's behaviour through the process of interviewing it in it's own language' as it surely has the possibility to open up...
    328 Words | 1 Page
  • Chimpanzee Politics - 760 Words
    Before reading Chimpanzee politics by Frans de Waal, I was unaware of the preeminent intelligence Chimpanzee’s possess. Although Chimpanzee’s showcase outstanding technical intelligence for primates and mammals, precluding human beings of course, their intelligence is truly exhibited in regards to social intelligence. One can argue the social intelligence of Chimpanzee’s rival that of human beings. Many theories have arisen to explain the high social intelligence of these fascinating animals,...
    760 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Discussion of Naturalism in “to Build a Fire”
    Naturalism, according to Nina Baym in the introduction of The Norton Anthology of American Literature, “introduces characters from the fringes and depths of society whose fates are determined by degenerate heredity, a sordid environment, and/or a good deal of bad luck” (7). Hence, the authors of naturalism often produce stories with twisted plots in which their protagonists encounter many obstacles and setbacks by nature, and these predicaments often injure or even take the characters' lives. Of...
    875 Words | 3 Pages
  • Animal Behavior - 4618 Words
    Importance of Animal Behavior Why do animals behave the way they do? The answer to this question depends on what the behavior is. A cat chases a mouse to catch it. A spider spins its sticky web to trap insects. A mother dog nurses her puppies to feed them. All of these behaviors have the same purpose: getting or providing food. All animals need food for energy. They need energy to move around. In fact, they need energy just to stay alive. Baby animals also need energy to grow and develop....
    4,618 Words | 13 Pages
  • Maternal Behaviour in Sheep - 2228 Words
    [pic] Summary of your observations and what you learnt about recording observations Over the past several weeks, studying the attitudes and actions of pregnant ewes helped to solidify the definition of maternal behaviour as being the archetype of care and attendance an offspring receives exclusively from its mother. Domestic sheep occur in a somewhat manipulative environment, allowing for a relatively predictable reaction composed of both acquired and innate behavioural...
    2,228 Words | 7 Pages
  • Ap Biology Lab 11: Animal Behavior
    Lab 11: Animal Behavior Introduction Ethology is the study of animal behavior. There are two specific categories of behavior: learned ad innate. Orientation behaviors place the animal in their specific environment. Animals move away from sensory input in taxis where as behavior is the response to sensory input. Stimulus’ of light, heat, moisture, sound, or chemicals are mostly found in taxis. Kinesis is the movement that does not result in orientation with stimulus. When animals respond to...
    605 Words | 2 Pages
  • Altruism and Family Tradition - 1023 Words
    Altruistic Behavior vs. Christmas at Home As a human being, there are several ways to interpret the act of altruism. The lineal denotation of altruism means the principle or practice of concern for the welfare of others. However, everyone has different point of view as they faced altruism and they tempted to call themselves as true of altruism without knowing the true standard. This idea is especially apparent when looking between the two nonfiction articles in Altruistic Behavior by Desmond...
    1,023 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Evolution of Animal Communication - 2188 Words
    The Evolution of Communication Animal communication can be defined as the provision of information that benefits the sender that is ensured by influencing the receiver into a response; this is known as a signal. Signals can be behavioural, physiological or morphological characteristics formed or preserved by natural selection because they allow communication between animals (Otte 1974). However animals also posses the ability to inadvertently produce stimuli, that can be exploited...
    2,188 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Effect of Perch Arrangement on the Behaviour of Individuals and Species in a Mixed-Species Aviary
    Figure 1. The proportion of time the parakeets spent performing each set of behaviours under control (a), horizontal (b) and vertical (c) conditions Figure 2. The proportion of time the cockatiels spent performing each set of behaviours under control (a), horizontal (b) and vertical (c) conditions. Although a large amount of time was spent perching, it can be seen here that preening was a dominant behaviour during the control conditions for the cockatiels. This is seen to reduce as the perch...
    7,469 Words | 23 Pages
  • Informative Speech Topics - 3071 Words
    Informative Speech Topics The following come from this site: http://www.goodspeechtopics.com/informational-speech-topics.html Informational Speech Topics 1. 1. Personality tests 2. 2. Who are the libertarians? 3. 3. Aromatheraphy 4. 4. What is inflation? 5. 5. Electric cars 6. 6. What was Watergate? 7. 7. Political parties 8. 8. Describe a piece of current legislation 9. 9. Biography of an important person...........who is...? 10. 10. History of an event (Halloween, etc.), or...
    3,071 Words | 27 Pages
  • Goals and Expectations Essay - 374 Words
     Goals and Expectations I think I learn best with explanations of some material on the board or also with some pictures or drawings that help me understand what’s going on or how something is composed is really helpful to me. Two learning techniques that are efficient to me are just reading material a couple of times and memorizing important things. I believe memorization is also very useful to me. A learning...
    374 Words | 1 Page
  • Animal and Child Behaviour - 548 Words
    Animal Behaviour applied to Human Psychology This assignment looks at the use of studies in Animal Behaviour and how it can relate in Child Development and what we can interpret from them. The study of animal behaviour is known as `Ethology’ The study of Human behaviour is known and `Ethnology’ The scientific study of animals is founded on: Darwin’s Theory that all life is related and descended from a common ancestor. Most studies have been carried out on Primate Monkeys as...
    548 Words | 3 Pages
  • English Animal - 298 Words
    Tammy Lim Period 1 Animal paragraph I am a Tundra Wolf. The Tundra wolf has good instincts in the wild which I possess in many different situations I encounter. For example, I do have a gut feeling whether if the person is to be trusted or not. Also when I encounter hard decisions, I always go with my gut feeling and never look back because I know my instinct will always lead me in the right direction. Also, the Tundra Wolf’s coat can be a majestic black color that also relates to my thick...
    298 Words | 1 Page
  • Understanding Animals' Intelligence and Capabilities
    Animals have such an important role in the world; without animals humans would not be able to survive. If one type of species becomes extinct, it would affect one link in the food chain. Humans underestimate animal intelligence, their capabilities, and their importance. Evolution has changed how humans and animals interact with each other. Charles Darwin brought the idea of evolution to the world and the theory survival of the fittest, and recognized animal consciousness (Page, 9). He looked at...
    2,023 Words | 6 Pages
  • Outline and Evaluate Bowlbys Theory of Attachment
    Outline and evaluate Bowlby’s theory of attachment (12 marks) Bowlby was an evolutionary Psychologist who believed that attachment is a part of evolutionary behaviour and focus on an animal’s instinctive and innate capabilities, and the functions of their behaviour. They believe this is useful for learning about human instinctive and biological behaviour. Attachment behaviour keeps a young animal or human safe. It is behaviour seen in all species of animal. Many species of animal form rapid...
    633 Words | 2 Pages
  • Pay It Forward - 1284 Words
    Pay It Forward Service, altruism, charity; these are all terms used to describe giving of one’s self to another with no expectation of repayment. For the purpose of this assignment the author of this essay would like to share her experience of being altruistic not just on one occasion but on a regular basis. Often the author has baked food for individuals, carried groceries for older or disabled individuals, opened doors for people, and on occasion has delivered meals to people in need. These...
    1,284 Words | 4 Pages
  • zoology - 470 Words
    Did you know that the word "Zoology" comes from the Greek words "animal" and "knowledge"? Wouldn't you like to know why animals act the way they do? Zoologist study the behavior of animals whether living or extinct. They observe and study animals and also write research articles and reports. The largest concentration of Zoologist and Wildlife positions in the United States are found in California. This job can provide answers to those who wonder why animals act or acted the way they did by...
    470 Words | 2 Pages
  • Factors Influencing Aggression - 1232 Words
    Factors Influencing Aggression There is not one explanation commonly agreed upon the cause of aggression. Many psychologists have proposed theories to explain aggression, but not all of these are strongly supported by scientific evidence. Most theories are organised into four categories explaining aggression: 1. aggression has a biological basis and is, at least partly, inborn 2. aggressionhas a social basis and occurs as a response to frustration 3. factorsin the environment can trigger...
    1,232 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chimpanzee Politics - 2098 Words
    Chimpanzee Politics by Frans de Waal chronicles a colony of 23 chimpanzees who live in an outdoor, open-air space at the Arnhem Zoo in the Netherlands. Of these 23 chimpanzees there are four males: Yeroen, Luit, Nikkie and Dandy. The colony also consists of three female subgroups, the largest made up of Mama, Gorilla, Franje, Amber and three children, Moniek, Roosje and Fons. The second largest subgroup includes Krom, Spin, Jimmie and her two sons Jakie and Jonas. And the third female subgroup...
    2,098 Words | 6 Pages
  • Physical Attractiveness and Widely Perceived Cuteness
    Cuteness is usually characterized by (though not limited to) some combination of infant-like physical traits, especially small body size with a disproportionately large head, large eyes, a pleasantly fair, though not necessarily small nose, dimples, and round and softer body features. Infantile personality traits, such as playfulness, fragility, helplessness, curiosity, innocence, affectionate behavior and a need to be nurtured are also generally considered cute. Konrad Lorenz argued in 1949...
    314 Words | 1 Page
  • Behaviour in Animals - 1796 Words
    Behaviour in humans and other animals Giving human characteristics to animals, inanimate objects or natural phenomena is a human trait called anthropomorphism. People who lack social connections with others who feel lonely, may seek out connections from nonhuman items, such as speaking to animals and treating them as human. Animals have the ability to lower human stress levels; simply interacting with an animal creates and endorphin rush in the human body which in result relieves stress....
    1,796 Words | 5 Pages
  • A Primate - 1568 Words
    The book A Primate’s Memoir by Robert M. Sapolsky takes the reader into the everyday life of a baboon. What Sapolsky was able to do was give insight in the everyday life of a baboon and we as the readers cannot help but compare and contrast the similarities and differences we have in common with these animals. Whether it is mating, fighting, competing, friendship or even mating we can all find similarities and differences. The book is filled with different stories taking and explaining the...
    1,568 Words | 4 Pages
  • Pill Bug Lab - 422 Words
    Allison Jones Dr. McNelis AP Biology--Class 6 2013 September 4 Introduction The study of animal behavior is ethology. There are two basic categories of animal behavior: learned behavior and innate, or inherited, behavior. Learned behavior is when animals acquire knowledge about their behavior through experience. Unlike learned behaviors, innate behavior exists naturally in animals, meaning that animals are born with some behaviors. In order to find a suitable environment, animals use...
    422 Words | 2 Pages
  • “Men are the savage and brutal forces of society.”
    English essay plan Introduction: In both texts, the men can be seen as forces of society, however the men in Street car show far more brutal and savage behaviour, where as the men in All new people, to a certain extent reflect freedom from the gender expectations and social structures of previous generations. Paragraph one: • Introduce and compare the male characters of both texts. • Jobs, roles and masculinity Stanley Myron Mitch Charlie Engineer in a factory - Physical labor...
    292 Words | 2 Pages
  • Review Questions Chapter 13 Biology
    Section 1 1. Define mutualism and commensalism. Mutualism- Both are benefited Commensalism- One benefits the other doesn't care. 2. Give examples of mutualism. Oxpeckers (a type of bird) and Zebras, the Oxpecker picks ticks and parasites off of the Zebra. The oxpecker gets food and the Zebra gets pest control. 3. Explain why most parasites do not kill their host. Why is it in their own best interest to keep their host alive? If a parasite kills its host the parasite will most likely die too...
    420 Words | 3 Pages
  • Passage from Grendel - 445 Words
    Passage Response Grendel Ch.10, paragraph 7: Mechanical Goat After opening with an almost poetic explanation of the sick shaper, John Gardner has Grendel encounter another “stupid animal.” First it was the ram in the beginning of the story, next the bull, and now a goat. He lifts his head, considers me, then lowers it again to keep an eye on crevasses and seams, icy scree, slick rocky ledges – doggedly continuing. There always seems to be a comedic aspect to Grendel’s frustration with...
    445 Words | 2 Pages
  • Do Animals Have Emotions
     31 July 2013 Do Animals Really Have Emotions? Animal emotion is a difficult and controversial subject. Scientific research is confirming what humans intuitively know: that animals have feelings and able to experience diverse types of emotions. Skeptics believe there are no possible ways animals can have emotions. They refuse the idea animals experience happiness or any other type of emotions as anthropomorphism; which occurs when humans project their own characteristics or behaviors to...
    1,128 Words | 3 Pages
  • Aggression Is a Basic Instinct in Animal While Its a Learned Behaviour in Human Being
    Instinct From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Part of a series on Ethology Ethology diversity.jpg Branches[show] Notable ethologists[show] Portal icon Animals portal Portal icon Biology portal Category Category v t e For other uses, see Instinct (disambiguation). Look up instinct in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Instinct or innate behavior is the hypothetical inherent inclination of a living organism toward a particular complex behavior. The simplest example of an instinctive...
    1,757 Words | 8 Pages
  • Innate and Learned Behaviour - 475 Words
    There are two types of behaviour: innate and learned. On one hand Nativists believe that a child’s behaviour is innate. Innate behaviour is defined as natural and instinctive. Swallowing, coughing and blinking are considered fixed and unchanging. These reflexes are involuntary responses to specific stimulation. The body naturally incorporates these reflexes to help the baby survive, for example without the ability to cough when food is stuck in the windpipe, the baby would choke. And without...
    475 Words | 2 Pages
  • Instinct - 389 Words
    Instinct or innate behavior is the inherent inclination of a living organism toward a particular complex behavior. The simplest example of an instinctive behavior is a fixed action pattern, in which a very short to medium length sequence of actions, without variation, are carried out in response to a clearly defined stimulus. Any behavior is instinctive if it is performed without being based upon prior experience (that is, in the absence of learning), and is therefore an expression of...
    389 Words | 2 Pages
  • Outline and evaluate the evolutionary theory of attachment
    Attachment is a deep and enduring bond that emotionally connects one person to another, however this attachment does not necessarily have to be shared as one person may have an attachment with an individual which is not reciprocated. Such attachments are characterized by specific behaviours in children such as seeking to be in the attachment figure’s company when upset or distressed. The evolutionary theory of attachment originates with the work of John Bowlby whom was inspired by the work of...
    836 Words | 2 Pages
  • Organismal Biology Study Guide
    Organismal Biology Study Guide for Test # 4 (4 MAY 2005 – Wed) Chapter 34 – Section F – Primates and the Evolution of Homo sapiens Opposable thumb – in primates; but fully opposable only in anthropoid primates Prosimians – example – lemurs Anthropoidea (anthropoids) – includes moneys, apes, humans Brachiating – swinging through the trees by the arms Overlapping fields of vision (3-D) – advantage for brachiating Old World vs New World monkeys – differences and similarities Know 4...
    1,115 Words | 8 Pages
  • Quiz 10 Biology - 1062 Words
    Points Awarded | 9.50 | Points Missed | 0.50 | Percentage | 95.0% | 1. The major reason for tropical deforestation is A) governments clearing forests to build cities. B) hurricane destruction of large regions. C) people clearing forests to open up land for agriculture. D) natural succession as global warming occurs. Points Earned: | 0.5/0.5 | | Correct Answer(s): | C | 2. The reason that the pronghorn antelope is not found outside North America is most likely that A)...
    1,062 Words | 6 Pages
  • Outline and Evaluate the Evolutionary Explination of Attachments
    The evolutionary explanation of attachment was mainly developed by John Bowlby. Starting in the early 1940s he suggests that there is an innate nature attachment, this meaning that a baby is born biologically with ideas/ behaviours, for a baby to form an attachment with a caregiver. Bowlby suggests that the main reason for this instinctive attachment is due to the primary dependency for food and survival on a mother figure. Based on Freud’s theory that a mother – child relationship is important...
    693 Words | 2 Pages
  • Lord of the Flies - 541 Words
    In Lord of the Flies by William Golding, conflict between two instincts of civilization and savagery is the driving force of the novel, explored through the dissolution of the young English boys’ civilized moral behavior as they accustom themselves to a brutal barbaric life in the jungle. As conflict rises between the groups of boys, a theme of polar opposites such as good vs. evil, order vs. chaos can be seen through the young men’s transparent demeanor. The central concern of Lord of the...
    541 Words | 2 Pages
  • Human Instincts - 930 Words
    Psychology Unit 1 Paper Human Instincts There are many arguments about whether human beings have instincts and not just responsive reflexes. I believe human beings all have natural born instincts. The definition of instincts tell us that they are unlearned and involuntary, which we all experience as humans. When animals are born they have certain instincts, just like humans. Instincts are in unlearned “fixed action patterns” or reactions to certain kinds of stimulis. Whether a...
    930 Words | 3 Pages
  • Little Albert Experiment - 2769 Words
     Conditioning: Why Age is a Factor Morgan L. Beausoleil Psychology 100 Professor Albers 28 October 2014 What makes one fear the things that we fear? John B. Watson and Rosaline Rayner proved that through conditioning can fears be instilled in people. Conditioning is a behavioral process that a response becomes more frequent and predictable in a given environment as a result of reinforcement, usually a stimulus or reward. The Little Albert...
    2,769 Words | 8 Pages
  • Literary Analysis Instinct vs Intellect
    LITERARY ANALYSIS: “To Build A Fire” Instincts vs Intellectualism ­­Vedika Gupta How many times have you seen birds flying south for the winter? They have not read somewhere or haven't used a computer to know that they must fly to survive. It is their basic and primitive instinct. In Jack London's "To Build a Fire", we see how that man's intelligence is sometimes foolish. The man, who is walking in seventy­five degrees below zero weather, lets his learned ...
    861 Words | 1 Page
  • Econmic - 329 Words
    Tiger Hi, everyone. Today, I am going to talk about tigers’ instinctive and learned behaviors which are valuable for them. Now, I will describe three the difference of instinctive behaviors and three the difference of learned behaviors. First of all, instinctive behaviors are the characteristic penchant of a lived organism toward a specific complex behavior. Tigers’ three the differences of instinctive behaviors are territorial, estrus and breeding. As a tiger, it may has numbers...
    329 Words | 1 Page
  • The Call of the Wild. - 1115 Words
    Buck, a huge, four-year-old half-Saint Bernard and half-Scottish shepherd dog, is living a life of civilized ease in California's Santa Clara Valley in the home of Judge Miller. It seems to be the best of all possible worlds, for Buck is the most prized animal that the Judge owns. Around this time, however, gold is discovered in the great North, and large dogs suddenly become tremendously valuable because these types of dogs are needed to haul the heavy sleds through the deep snow fields....
    1,115 Words | 3 Pages
  • Breeding Animals in Zoos: Is Really for Animals?
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