Edwin Arlington Robinson Essays & Research Papers

Best Edwin Arlington Robinson Essays

  • Imagery by Edwin Arlington Robinson
    Hall 1 Mrs. Hawks English CP 1 10 April 2012 Imagery by Edwin Arlington Robinson Edwin Arlington Robinson was born in Head Tide, Maine on December 22, 1869. He moved to a town named Gardiner where he grew up; the town later provided the model for a series of poems that he wrote throughout his career as a poet (Peschel). Robinson attended Harvard from 1891 to 1893 even though his parents were against going to a school of higher value for the education. President Theodore Roosevelt helped...
    1,197 Words | 4 Pages
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson bio
    Born in Maine and educated for two years at Harvard, Edwin Arlington Robinson lived much of his life in New York City, where he worked at odd jobs, including a time with the subway authority. He never married and had few friends. For his earliest poems, written during the 1880s, he fell under “the influence of Thomas Hardy's rather gloomy novels of individual tragedy” (none of Hardy's poetry was published in book form until 1898, by which time Robinson's style was already formed). Robinson's...
    1,199 Words | 5 Pages
  • "Richard Cory" by Edwin Arlington Robinson
    The Rollercoaster The poem "Richard Cory" by Edwin Arlington Robinson is a tone rollercoaster. The tone changes throughout the poem. The poem goes from happiness, to envious, ending in depression. The author successfully uses different tones to keep the readers attention and realistically tell a story that can be identified with today's society. The author uses happiness to draw in the reader's attention and to keep the reader happy as if he or she was actually there. The author describes...
    462 Words | 2 Pages
  • Richard Cory, Edwin Arlington Robinson
    Claudia Garces In the poem “Richard Cory”, Edwin Arlington Robinson argues that ones outer shell can be deceiving, never envy your neighbors fortune. Richard Cory glides through town glowing looking “richer than a king”(9) pretending to have all the happiness anyone ever imagined. This alone causes the envy of the entire town. They probably will never know if he is truly happy or if all this is just another front. “We people”(2) who are never satisfied with our own goals and...
    873 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Edwin Arlington Robinson Essays

  • Critical Analysis of Edwin Arlington Robsin
    Her Kisses Were the Keys to Paradise Kaitlyn Cornell In Edwin Arlington Robinson's poetry, haunted houses sound like hanunted houses, dark hills sound like dark hills, but to Robinson it goes beyond that. By the metaphors, images, and emotion he puts into his writing, it is clear that he is feeling something beyond the paper and ink. Many of his works are dark and melancholy and reflect something that may have happened in his own life. There is a reoccuring theme that symbolizes his wife or...
    1,428 Words | 4 Pages
  • A comparison of W.H. Auden's "The Unknown Citizen" and Edwin Arlington Robinson's "Richard Cory".
    Throughout time, society has had its ways of developing what is to be considered the Ideal Citizen. This Citizen consists of many traits that are favorable by the many. If someone were to encounter such an individual, they would respect them, hear others good praise about them, and possibly even admire them. They would likely give the viewer the impression of an enjoyable lifestyle, one that many would trade with their own. However, the ways in which society operates have made it easy to not...
    958 Words | 3 Pages
  • The similarities and differences of four poems: "Lucinda Matlock" by Masters, "Chicago" by Sandburg, "Richard Cory" by Robinson, and "We Wear the Mask" by Dunbar
    Poem Comparison All four poems that I read are related in their purposes and goals; however, they are also very different. "Lucinda Matlock" by Edward Lee Masters, "Chicago" by Carl Sandburg, "Richard Cory" by Edwin Arlington Robinson, and "We Wear the Mask" by Paul Laurence Dunbar are all about the joys and sorrows of life. How we look at life makes life good or bad. "Lucinda Matlock" is a story of a woman, who, by some standards, would have a life that we consider a mediocre. However, the...
    444 Words | 2 Pages
  • gangsta - 1441 Words
    Notes "Richard Cory." Poetry for Students. Ed. Mary Ruby. Vol. 4. Detroit: Gale, 1999. 115-124. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 22 Feb. 2013. 1.First published in E. A. Robinson’s second book of poems, Children of the Night, “Richard Cory” is one of the short, lyrical and dramatic character sketches that Robinson is now best known for. (page 115) 2.The very embodiment of that materialistic dream, Cory kills himself for some unspecified reason, perhaps a spiritual emptiness or...
    1,441 Words | 6 Pages
  • Richard Cory - 1105 Words
    People either idealize or resent the upper echelon of society. The song despises the upper class but still thinks the grass is greener on the other side and the other shows him in a more positive light. The song focuses on the miscreant behavior, and the poem talks about idealizing his image. The biggest difference is the view of the upper class the poem holds him in reverence and the song curses him, but both the song and the poem wish for what he had. The poem Richard Cory by Edward...
    1,105 Words | 3 Pages
  • Greener on the other side - 521 Words
    Jennifer DeMaar Professor Payne English 211 October 22, 2013 “Greener on the other side” In Edwin Arlington Robinson’s poem “Richard Cory”, the reader is compelled to think about what makes life worth living. The men who admire Richard Cory so greatly “cursed the bread” that they eat for dinner, grumbling because they have no meat. The men who have to work hard for their food covet the life of a man who appears to possess all of the niceties life can offer. The men are bitter about their...
    521 Words | 2 Pages
  • Poetry and Figuartive - 1145 Words
    Poetry and Figurative Language paper Eng/340 Natasha Parker Week 2 Since this week’s appraisals I have selected the following three poems; “My grandmother’s love letters” by Hart Crane, “The road not taken” Robert Frost, as well as “Richard Cory” by Edward Arlington Robinson. My Grandmother’s Love Letters By Hart Crane (1899-1932) There are no stars tonight But those of memory. Yet how much room for memory there is In the loose girdle of soft rain. There is even room enough For...
    1,145 Words | 4 Pages
  • Compare and Contrast, "The Story of and Hour" and Richard Cory
    Compare and Contrast Criminals are tried in our court system everyday for crimes they are accused of committing. In these court cases, witnesses are called to give an account of what happened in the particular incident and then a jury of twelve members decides the criminal's ruling on the case. The jury does not listen to just one witness; it takes into account the stories of many witnesses in order to decipher the truth. "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin and "Richard Cory" by Edwin...
    501 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Deceptive Life of Richard Cory
    The Deceptive Life of “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson When we see people we want to be like, we never stop to think if they are happy with their life, or if they have ever contemplated about their death. In “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson, he shows us that what we see or think of other people can be wrong. Robinson uses imagery to put a picture in our heads. When the speaker says “He was a gentleman from sole to crown, Clean favored, and imperially slim.” Robinson is...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • Richard Cory - 571 Words
    Richard Cory Revision “Richard Cory” is a world-renowned narrative poem by Edwin Arlington Robinson. It was first published in 1897, during a time when the US economy was still suffering from a severe depression. Richard Cory is admired by the townspeople because he was rich, educated, and a gentleman. Richard Cory went home one summer night and shot himself in the head. “Richard Cory” is a poem that employs rich imagery, contains an impacting theme, and relates to modern society “Richard...
    571 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis of Richard Cory - 400 Words
    Analysis of Richard Cory In the ironic poem, “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson, the author conveys a simple profound message that someone else’s life may not be an ideal existence. Richard Cory’s wealth, distinction and admiration from the ‘people on the pavement’ demonstrated that in their eyes he was the American dream. He was respected, well admired, envied and they wished they could trade lives with him. “Richard Cory” is a dramatic poem, written in four stanzas of regular...
    400 Words | 1 Page
  • Richard Cory poem - 271 Words
    Aveen Aulo English 100 Comparison/contrast This particular poem about "Richard Cory" by Edwin Arlington Robinson, reminds me of the saying "don't judge people. You never know what kind of battle they are fighting." People that knew Richard saw him as a rich man that anyone could wish to live his life. Everyone thought he was living a perfect life, because he was wealthy, good looking and respected by ...
    271 Words | 1 Page
  • Richard Cory: the Man Who Was
    Elliott Brown Essay #1 Cooper Richard Cory: The Man Who Was "Richard Cory" describes how one man is not as perfect as his townspeople think. They believe that he is better than everyone else. However, the man in the poem, Richard Cory, kills himself. Throughout the poem, the author, Edwin Arlington Robinson, provides insight into the chilling end of the poem where Cory puts "a bullet through his head" (16), conveys how you cannot judge a book by its cover, and explains how Richard Cory...
    853 Words | 3 Pages
  • Richard Cory - 896 Words
    "Richard Cory" describes how one man is not as perfect as his townspeople think. The poem “Richard Cory” was written in 1897 by Edwin Arlington Robinson. It is about a gentleman by the name of Richard Cory; a man everybody admired. The townspeople look at him as if he had it all. They see his money, feel his power, know his intelligence, and not one time do they ever doubt his happiness, yet Richard Cory “puts a bullet through his head”. In 1966 the musicians Simon and Garfunkel wrote the song...
    896 Words | 3 Pages
  • Richard Cory - 362 Words
    Raphael Niknam 12/24/2014 Richard Cory A poem named Richard Cory was written by Edwin Arlington Robinson, it contains much depth and character. Richard was a man who everybody looked up to. He was the ultimate gentleman yet he still addressed folks on their own level when conversing with them. We can see from the phrase ‘And he was rich -- yes, richer than a king--‘that Richard was truly wealthy. His mannerism and character was such that he was adored by all. As we can infer...
    362 Words | 1 Page
  • Poem Paraphrase paper - 1005 Words
    Poem Paraphrase Paper When Richard Cory entered the business district all of the townspeople would stand aside and watch him. He was trim and clean cut. He was very rich and knowledgeable. He was also extremely privileged. The townspeople wanted to be him. They continue to work their lives away. One day Richard Cory killed himself. This brief summary of Edwin Arlington Robinson’s “Richard Cory” does not capture the true emotion and irony presented in the original poem. It excludes many uses...
    1,005 Words | 3 Pages
  • Reading Response to Poem Richard Cory
    After reading the poem Richard Cory by Edwin Arlington Robinson (1897). I have to say that it is one of my favorites so far. This poem reminded me of how every day we look at others out of envy for what they have showing on the outside, but we never really know what’s going on inside of their everyday lives. I must say that the irony of the poem really caught my attention A man who has everything as far a wealth, but nothing by way of personal satisfaction I could really identify with...
    262 Words | 1 Page
  • Richard Cory Literary Paragraph
     Richard Cory By Edwin Arlington Robinson Looks Can Be Deceiving From: Corina Casey To: Mrs. Pucknell Pages: 1 Due: February 2nd, 2015 Richard Cory by Edwin Arlington Robinson is a poem that proves that looks can be deceiving. To those who did not know him, Richard Cory seems like a generally happy man. The narrator states that “We people of the pavement looked at him/ He was a gentleman from sole to crown.” (Robinson) By using the word gentleman, it is suggested that Richard Cory was...
    326 Words | 1 Page
  • Richard Cory - 382 Words
    Themes of “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson Some themes retrieved from “Richard Cory” were: you can’t buy happiness, don’t judge a book by its cover, and money doesn’t solve everything. There are many poems written about death and how people judge one another and Edwin Arlington Robinson’s poem “Richard Cory” is just that. Robinson tries to tell the reader many things in his short four stanza poem. “Richard Cory” is about a wealthy man that chooses to commit suicide and what the people...
    382 Words | 1 Page
  • Compare and Contrast of Short Stories
    Kathleen Smith English 112 Beckmann Paper 3 rough draft July 16, 2010 Compare and Contrast Chopin, “The Story of an Hour” to Robinson, “Richard Cory” In today’s society, criminals are tried in a court system, with a jury of their peers, for crimes they are accused of committing. In some court cases, witnesses are called to give their testimony to as what they have seen occurred in a particular incident, after which the jury of twelve members recommends a ruling on the case. The jury does...
    845 Words | 3 Pages
  • Poem Comparison - 544 Words
    The three poems "Richard Cory" by Edwin Arlington Robinson, "We Wear the Mask" by Paul Laurence Dunbar, and "Not Waving but Drowning" by Stevie Smith all have the same theme that appearances can be deceiving and that people are not always what they seem. The poems convey the idea that people can misinterpret the meaning behind other people's actions because the actions are deliberately misleading. The subjects in each of these poems give people the wrong impression by making them think their...
    544 Words | 2 Pages
  • Great Gatsby Compared to Richard Cory
    “Richard Cory” written by Edwin Arlington Robinson is about a man who appears to be admirable on the exterior but no one is familiar with his interior, which is suffering badly. The narrator talks Richard Cory up by stating, he was "richer than a king,"(line 9) "admirably schooled,"(line 10) "we thought that he was everything to make us wish that we were in his place."(lines 11-12) Until an abrupt ending to the poem, "one calm summer night, went home and put a bullet through his head."(lines...
    794 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mr. Flood's Party? - 1819 Words
    Mr. Flood's Party? When used correctly, symbolism and irony can be very effective. Edwin Arlington Robinson is a master of symbolism, and uses irony like no poet before or after him could even conceive to. In Mr. Flood's Party Robinson uses symbolism to forewarn his readers of Mr. Flood's inevitable death. The irony saturates the poem and sets the reader up for an unexpectedly non-ironic conclusion. Robinson relies on irony and symbolism to better illustrate the old man drinking and talking...
    1,819 Words | 5 Pages
  • Richard Cory Ezra Farmer
    Abigail Bauer AP English 02/17/15 While reading the poems “Richard Cory” and “Ezra Farmer”, it is almost immediately evident which poem is an original and which is a parody. Both poems are clearly about men that are popular among those he meets, but once the reader looks beneath the surface, they notice how the diction plays an important role in relaying the theme to the audience it is presented to. In the poem “Richard Cory” written by Edwin Arlington Robinson, the theme being portrayed is...
    1,236 Words | 3 Pages
  • Richard Cory - Analysis - 693 Words
    The narrator in "Richard Cory" by Edwin Arlington Robinson is a low class working citizen telling the reader, in detail, about a distinguished gentleman named Richard Cory who eventually "put a bullet through his head." Almost everyone, including the narrator, would stare at him with awe every time they saw him. He was "imperially slim"(4), always charismatic and well-dressed. He was extremely courteous and polite. He would please everyone's heart with a simple "Good Morning." Then the narrator...
    693 Words | 2 Pages
  • Compilation of Poems - 626 Words
    Torres, Paul Christopher A. BSME-II AFRICA (by David Diop) Africa, my Africa Africa of proud warriors in ancestral savannahs Africa of whom my grandmother sings On the banks of the distant river I have never known you But your blood flows in my veins Your beautiful black blood that irrigates the fields The blood of your sweat The sweat of your work The work of your slavery Africa, tell me Africa Is this you, this back that is bent This back that breaks Under the weight...
    626 Words | 4 Pages
  • Richard Cory - 1004 Words
    “Richard Cory” Poetry has been a constant form of art for centuries and has allowed poets to truly express their deepest desires or feelings. The poem “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson, written in 1897 (Bildir) uses simplicity, irony, and a melodic rhyme scheme that sounds similar to a song. The main theme throughout the poem is that people are not always who they appear to be. Moreover, the people that seem to have it all may still be emotionally unstable and appearances are...
    1,004 Words | 3 Pages
  • Richard Cory Analysis/ Response
    1. In the poem “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson, what does the death of this man reflect on the society and how he was idolized? 2. Life is a constant theme in “Richard Cory” and throughout the poem Cory is referred to in high praise, but with closer inspection, it can be seen that Richard Cory is already almost seen as dead when he is alive because people treated with him with too high of a status. “We people on the pavement looked at him” (2), this line figuratively means that Cory...
    475 Words | 1 Page
  • Authenticity for the Rest of US - 991 Words
    Authenticity for the Rest of Us This chosen group of poems gives examples of contrast between appearance and reality. We learn that appearances can greatly deviate from what is hidden on the inside. Through the use of irony, we also learn the virtues of authenticity. Appearance versus reality is exhibited in “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson through the use of visually stimulating words to evoke various feelings in us. In E E Cummings’s “Buffalo Bill’s, the speaker admires Buffalo...
    991 Words | 3 Pages
  • Literary criticism and anlysis of "Richard Cory," "I'm nobody! Who are you?," and "We wear the mask."
    Never judge a book by its cover. Appearances can greatly deviate from what is hidden on the inside. "Richard Cory" by Edwin Arlington Robinson, "We wear the mask" by Paul Laurence Dunbar, and "I'm nobody! Who are you?" by Emily Dickinson each give examples of appearances in contrast to reality. Robinson's "Richard Cory" is essentially about a man who is set upon a golden pedestal by others and due to his suppressed sadness, kills himself. "We wear the mask" by Dunbar shows us society's use of a...
    1,558 Words | 4 Pages
  • All in your Attitude - 1239 Words
    Attitude: A Positive One Goes a Long Way Have you ever witnessed someone going through a tough situation that was just completely unavoidable? They resolve to keep beating themselves up about it and leave only a shell of the person they once were. Even if these situations arose through no fault of their own, people feel the need to blame themselves. This in turn can affect their quality of life, but what is it one’s quality of life? It is defined as the general well-being of a person...
    1,239 Words | 4 Pages
  • Those Winter Sundays - 862 Words
    "Those Winter Sundays" by Robert Hayden is a poem about a how the author is recalling how his father would wake up early on Sundays, a day which is usually a reserved as a day of rest by many, to fix a fire for his family. The mood of this poem is a bit sad. It portrays a father, who deeply cares for his family but doesn't seem to show it by emotions, words, or touching. It also describes a home that isn't very warm in feelings as well as the title" Those Winter Sundays" The author describes the...
    862 Words | 2 Pages
  • Richard Cory analysis - 1578 Words
    Corey Chilson Kevin Neustaedter Eng-102-01-14 April 12, 2014 The non-druggy Kurt Colbain, Richard Cory Michelle and her family were multi-millionaires. They have a nine bedroom house across from the private school named Principia where she attended school. The Kogans also owned two private jets for personal travel to their houses in Moscow, Vienna Austria, Florida, and Italy. Michelle had everything she ever wanted, and could do anything she could imagine. Michelle was still the most...
    1,578 Words | 4 Pages
  • Miniver Cheevy Analysis - 337 Words
    PR14 Miniver Cheevy Edwin A. Robinson Miniver Cheevy by Edwin Arlington Robinson is a dramatic lyric poem that acts as self-portrait satire as Robinson ridicules his own life and dreams of a living in a time period where his failures could be seen as triumphs. Through his character Miniver Cheevy, Robinson criticizes not only himself, but 19th and 20th century America using diction. Robinson gave himself away with the first line: “Miniver Cheevy, child of scorn.” Robinson's parents were...
    337 Words | 1 Page
  • Richard Cory Poem Analysis
    Ladyhawk Best Answer - Chosen by Asker The poem “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson is about the tragic death of a wealthy idolized man. Robinson uses the irony of a man that seems to have the perfect life, to show us the reality that all is not what it seems. It is not the actual suicide that is the subject of the poem, but the idea that outward appearances may not always reflect what is going on inside, and that money may buy fame and admiration but not true...
    532 Words | 2 Pages
  • Richard Cory - 723 Words
    “Richard Cory” was written by Edwin Arlington Robinson in 1897.From the title we establish that we will be reading about Richard Cory but we don’t know exactly what will be discussed. We then read the poem and understand the issue he wrote about still exists today. The poem shows the difference between image and reality. It shows how someone who appears to have everything in life according to other’s societal beliefs may have a very different perception of their lives. Robinson wants us to...
    723 Words | 2 Pages
  • Richard Corey - 4406 Words
    In “Richard Cory”, Edwin Arlington Robinson uses irony, simplicity, and perfect rhyme to depict the theme of the poem. The rhyme in “Richard Cory” is almost song-like, and it continues throughout the whole poem. The theme of the poem is that appearances are deceiving. The poem is about a man who everyone thinks is a “gentleman from sole to crown”, who then commits suicide. Irony is used in the poem very skillfully to show that appearances may be deceiving. When reading the poem, you get caught...
    4,406 Words | 17 Pages
  • Richard Cory - Analysis - 570 Words
    Many poets write about death and appearances. In the poem Richard Cory by Edwin Arlington Robinson, the author tries to communicate several things. Robinsons poem is about a rich man that commits suicide, and the thoughts of the people in town that watch him in his everyday life. In Richard Cory, Robinson is communicating that outward appearances are not always what they seem, an that money does not always make a person happy Through the poem, Robinson never hints to any relationships that...
    570 Words | 2 Pages