Dialect Essays & Research Papers

Best Dialect Essays

  • Dialects - 2071 Words
    The Dialects of American English Before I learn sociolinguistics class, I think it is quite difficult to tell what the difference between language and dialect is. But, after I had learned I found out that language is something that mankind use to communicate to each other. Language is a big word. It concludes dialect, vernacular, and so on. Nevertheless, dialect is the language that use only in idiolect, only use in their group. For me, I think that there are many dialects in each country....
    2,071 Words | 11 Pages
  • dialect - 1187 Words
     Introduction I was born and raised in Korea, Seoul which is the capital and largest metropolis of South Korea. Oppositely, my parents were born in country side. My mom was born and raised Gyung Sang area till she got married. My mom and all of her family speak gyung sang region dialect. My dad was born and raised jealla area till he got married so my dad and his all family speak jealla region dialect. These two region dialects have pretty different accents. I speak the standard Korean...
    1,187 Words | 4 Pages
  • Patidarangia Dialect - 1664 Words
    SYNOPSIS The problem to be investigated: The dialect of Palashbari (Palashbaria) and Pati Darrang (Patidarrangia) : A comparative study. Introduction: Because of some political, social, cultural and geographical causes, if a particular area with certain language is not communicated in a regular basis, then the language of that area forms regional dialects. The Assamese language which is used and spread in a large area of both the two banks of the Brahmaputra valley also gives birth to...
    1,664 Words | 5 Pages
  • Social Dialects - 3282 Words
    Social dialects Rothstain and S.Rothstain (2009), they difined dialect a an aspect of language that refers to variation in pronunciation, words and, grammar of a specific language and as a part of every language, resulting from geographic, occupational and social differences. Read(1986), said that dialect can be divided into social and regional varieties. Regional dialects are difened geographically; social dialect are difined by socioeconomic and sociocultural...
    3,282 Words | 9 Pages
  • All Dialect Essays

  • Dialect Continuum - 1136 Words
    A dialect continuum is a range of dialects spoken across a large geographical area, differing only slightly between areas that are geographically close to each other, and gradually decreasing in mutual intelligibility as the distances become greater. Dialects separated by great geographical distances may not be mutually comprehensible. According to the Ausbausprache - Abstandsprache - Dachsprache paradigm, these dialects can be considered Abstandsprachen (i.e., as stand-alone languages)....
    1,136 Words | 4 Pages
  • Dialect in America - 778 Words
    Anna Navarrete English 828 Hein March 29, 2013 Essay #2 Dialect in America What is diversity to you? From the streets of San Francisco you are transported into many different countries. You smell different foods, see different looks, and hear different languages. These diverse cultures make San Francisco special. If the city of San Francisco introduced a law to adopt a standard language it would end the diversity that San Francisco stands for. In Northern California we speak our own...
    778 Words | 3 Pages
  • Dialect and Accents - 1557 Words
    Strong accents and dialects are dying out because of the world today needs standard clear communication where everyone speaks and writes in the same way. It is better not to reveal your wealth and status with your accent. Discuss with reference to your own regional voice. We all speak with an accent and we all speak a dialect these include both the Standard English dialect and the Modern Non-standard Dialects. There are variations of accents according to a speaker’s age, gender, ethnicity and...
    1,557 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Difference between Language and Dialect
    Language and Dialect 学生 : 学院 : 高级翻译学院 年级 : 2007级 研究方向 : 商务翻译研究 课程名称 : 语言学理论 任课老师 :莫爱屏教授 论文提交日期 : 2008/01/08 Abstract: This paper aims to probe into the study of language and dialect in the field of sociolinguistics. Part 1 is a general introduction to the issues being covered in the paper. Part 2 centers on the analysis of certain criteria...
    3,942 Words | 12 Pages
  • Sociolinguistics: Dialect Continuum and Language
    Sociolinguistics 1. Subject matter of sociolinguistics SL concentrates on the diversity of language in society according to various factors such as geographical distribution, age group, ethnic group, socioeconomic class, gender, etc. A broad definition of SL is “the study of language in relation to society”. SL is relatively young discipline, which became recognized as a separate branch of language study in the late1960’s and early 1970’s. The traditional view in linguistics...
    3,770 Words | 11 Pages
  • Regional Social Dialects - 1029 Words
    Week 4 Lecture Regional & Social Dialects WHAT CAN YOU TELL ABOUT THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THESE SPEAKERS? Notes on Examples  Reasonable (even accurate) guesses about speaker’s various characteristics e.g. socio-economic or educational background esp. for English accents in Britain • With distinctive regional accent  origin even from short utterance Holmes (2008) p. 127 3 Characteristics of Speech • Remember? No two people speak the same! – ∞ sources of variation...
    1,029 Words | 11 Pages
  • Regional and Social Dialects - 482 Words
    • The pith of their voices= is one of the most obvious speech differences between women and men is in the pitch of their voices. This difference develops in puberty. • Boy´s vocal cords generally grow faster and bigger than girls at puberty. • Men´s heads and lungs are also larger than women´s. • A result male voices generally sound lower in pitch than women´s • Differences are relative. The pitch ranges of women and men overlap to a considerable extent....
    482 Words | 3 Pages
  • Influences on My Dialect - 368 Words
    Laurie Curtis ENGL 1304 M. Allison 3/30/2011 Influences on My Dialect The use of varying languages around the globe is a way to express one’s personal uniqueness and even cultural background. As Americans we tend to be more welcoming of ethnic diversity in our country, however, when it comes to academic writing, a language barrier is not typically praised. Students are usually not encouraged to write in their own dialect and are expected to have achieved the mastery of Standard Written...
    368 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dialect and English Language - 374 Words
    Name: Sanjeeb Thakali. Subject name & code: Mathematics for IT (BT 0063) Roll no.: 1308014090 Q.1 In a group of 50 people, 35 speak Hindi, 25 speak both English and Hindi and all the people speak at least one of the two languages. How many people only speak English and not Hindi? How many people speak English? Solution: Here, Let people speaking English language be ‘’E’’ and people speaking Hindi language be “H” respectively. E...
    374 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sociolinguistics: Dialect and Language - 1141 Words
     What is Sociolinguistics? Is the field which studies the relationship between language and society, including cultural norms, expectations and context on the way language is used. What is Language? Language is a means of communication, it is used to communicate meaning, as it is also used to maintain and establish social relationships. What do Sociolinguistics study? Sociolinguistics study the following: 1- They study the relationship between language and society. 2- They are...
    1,141 Words | 6 Pages
  • Are Dialects Just as Acceptable in Public Places
    Are Dialects Just as Acceptable in Public Places Nowadays, most of Chinese people communicate with each other in Mandarin and the government also encourages speak Mandarin in public places. However, in my opinion, dialects still play an important role in some occasions and they are just as acceptable in public places. First of all, dialects are more than languages but culture of China. For example, along with the popularity of the double-people twist, their dialect is also very popular....
    317 Words | 1 Page
  • The Use of Concept Dialects in the Entertainment Industry
    Module DSM 201 Consumer Behavior Critically Evaluate the Effectiveness on The Use of The concept Dialects in the Entertainment Industry I declared 1,130 words are used in this paper. CONTENTS 1. The Culture. The Dialects. The Entertainment Industry 3 2. Segmentation. Market Segment 4 3. Market Specialization. Target Marketing 5 4. Brand. Brand Identity 6 5. Conclusion 7 1 The Culture. The Dialects. The Entertainment Industry...
    1,177 Words | 5 Pages
  • Lexicology. Different Dialects and Accents of English
    Preface Every language allows different kinds of variations: geographical or territorial, perhaps the most obvious, stylistic, the difference between the written and the spoken form of the standard national language and others. It is the national language of England proper, the USA, Australia, New Zealand and some provinces of Canada. It is the official language of Wales, Scotland, in Gibraltar and on the island of Malta. Modern linguistics distinguishes territorial variants of a national...
    3,803 Words | 10 Pages
  • Vernacular Dialect in Their Eyes Were Watching God
    Vernacular Dialect in Their Eyes Were Watching God In the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neal Hurston, the spoken words of the characters are often simple and rough. Hurston uses vernacular dialect in order to preserve the culture of southern blacks in the early twentieth century. The author’s use of dialect in the novel demonstrates the difference between Janie’s relationship with Jody and Janie’s relationship with Tea Cake. When Janie is married to Jody, few conversations...
    502 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Trends of Dialect Leveling and Internal Variation in the Process of English Development
    Explain the trends of dialect leveling and internal variation in the process of development of new varieties of Englishes. "Dialect differences are reduced as speakers acquire features from other varieties as well as avoid features from their own variety that are somehow different. This may occur over several generations until a stable compromise dialect develops."(Siegel, 1997) The writer here is referring the linguistic accommodation made by speakers with different dialects to eventually...
    1,031 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Use of Southern Language and Dialect in Their Eyes Were Watching God
    Their eyes were Watching God Use of language and dialect Zora Neale Hurston was born in Notasulga, Alabma, but primarily grew up in Eatonville, Florida. Eatonville was the first all black town in the United States and is featured heavily in the novel. This may in fact be because Hurston considered Eatonville to be her true home and claimed a few times to be her birthplace. This is because, in 1901, according to A Crticial Companion to Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Reference to...
    1,021 Words | 3 Pages
  • Describe Concepts of Dialect, Context of Situation, Native Speaker and Lingua Franca
    From the list of concepts stated above, I have chosen to describe the concepts of dialect, context of situation, native speaker and lingua franca with regards to the local context in my discussion. Dialect In Singapore, the racial groups are categorized into their ‘dialect groups’, meaning their ‘ethnic’ groups. It is stated that “every Singaporean has an officially allocated ‘dialect group’ which normally corresponds to the paternal ancestral language, but does not necessarily to anything in...
    1,610 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Role of Dialect Representation in Speaking from the Margins the Lesson of Toni Cade Bambara
    The role of dialect representation in speaking from the margins: "The Lesson" of Toni Cade Bambara by Katy M. Wright "What kinda work they do and how they live and how come we ain't in on it? Where we are is who we are, Miss Moore always pointin out. But it don't necessarily have to be that way, she always adds then waits for somebody to say that poor people have to wake up and demand their share of the pie and don't none of us know what kind of pie she talking about in the first damn place."...
    4,237 Words | 11 Pages
  • Com/150 Expository Essay-Language in the United States
    Language in the United States Salima R. Smith COM/150 February 14, 2010 Instructor: Justi Glaros Diversity in America in not just limited to a persons ethnic background or religion, language also can separate a group of people. Ever since the first European settlers inhabited America and intergraded with Native Americas there was a language barrier. Today, although English is the language spoken by the majority of people in America, those language barriers are still present. These...
    1,096 Words | 3 Pages
  • Spoken Language - 420 Words
    Explore the ways your own spoken language is adapted in different situations and how the attitudes of other people influenced these adaptions Over the years as time passes by our language progresses and develops. People all around the world will have their own form of how they speak different dialects, languages or accents. Today I’m going to be exploring and evaluating the factors that affect the way my own spoken language can adapt in different situations and how the attitudes of other...
    420 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Does Language Reflect Me
    English Essay: Introduction: The way you speak to a person depends on the language form you choose to speak in. At the same time, it also depends whom you are speaking to. There are a variety of ways of saying a particular sentence to a person. Let us take the sentence ”Hello, how are you,” if you are greeting a very important person, you would say it in a very sophisticated and well-mannered way, such as ” Good afternoon Mr. Ahmed, how are you feeling today?” Whereas if you are meeting your...
    698 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mothers Tongue - 588 Words
    Mothers Tongue Amy Tans "Mother Tongue" is a look into the way some people, look to language as a way as a sign of how educated you are. According to Amy she did not realize how we use different languages or different tones when we are engaging in conversation with others. When you are talking with friends or close family you would use different dialect or slang, then if you were talking to your boss or teacher. The tone of your voice can also show's that if you are louder this might...
    588 Words | 2 Pages
  • My Idiolect - 728 Words
    Idiolect Be able to identify my own use of language in a variety of situations with different people. My idiolect is English, Mirpuri and Urdu. I speak English the most when I am in public, because the community around me also speak English as it is their mother tongue. I have been taught this well-known language by members of my previous and current school. English is a general and an everyday idiolect. I don't have any difficulty in reading, writing, or speaking this language as I have known...
    728 Words | 2 Pages
  • Attitudes to Language - 952 Words
    DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH & COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATION STUDIES ATTITUDES TO LANGUAGE Language clearly plays a major role in all aspects of society. The most obvious is its social role of allowing people to relate to each other in all facets of their lives: to share information, emotions and ways of life. We use language as a means of navigating our daily lives and it plays an integral role in most of our interactions. Perhaps for this reason, French is regarded as an elegant and...
    952 Words | 3 Pages
  • Historical Foundations - 1192 Words
    Abstract The rise and spread of vernacular language is very interesting and unique. It was not until after the twelfth century that it began to catch on. The spread of vernacular language affected many different cultures in different ways. There were three key elements that assisted in the spread of vernacular languages. They were the need to spread the beliefs of religions, technological advances, and the role of women in society. Historical Foundations...
    1,192 Words | 4 Pages
  • How My Spoken Language Changes in Different Situations
    Spoken Language Although I have my own idiolect, the way I speak constantly changes. This is because I try to adapt my spoken language to suit the situation I am in. There are many reasons for why I try to adapt my spoken language some of the main reasons being that I am fearful of the judgements and perceptions that others may make because of the way I speak also being afraid of exclusion or not being able to fit in and sometimes I feel pressurised into speaking in a certain way. With my...
    718 Words | 2 Pages
  • Half-Caste and Unrelated Identity
    Homework – Compare how poets explore language in ‘Unrelated Incidents’ and one other poem. The language employed in poems ‘Unrelated Incidents’ and ‘Half-Caste’ effectively portrays the discrimination both poets receive. The writers’ use of language shows how they feel and how they deal with the discrimination. Both poems show positive diction. ‘Unrelated Incident ‘ is written as third person, making it feel we are being directly spoken to and half-caste is written in first person so the...
    963 Words | 3 Pages
  • communication analysis - 307 Words
     ANALYSIS I chose to analyze my reflective piece entitled “If dem doh care why should I” by the use of primarily investigating dialect variation and communicative behaviors. Dialectal variation refers to the variety of a language due to geographic, individual and group factors. In the monologue the two main dialects used were Creole and Standard English. Creole is a language with pidgin in its ancestry...
    307 Words | 1 Page
  • The Scope of Sociolinguistics - 1213 Words
    The Scope of Sociolinguistics Definition: Sociolinguistics is the study of the relationship between language and society. Sociolinguistics is a derivational word. Two words that form it are sociology and linguistics. Sociology refers to a science of society (which is a grouping of individuals, which is characterized by common interests and may have distinctive culture and institutions), and linguistics refers to a science of language (which is a means of communicating information, and a...
    1,213 Words | 5 Pages
  • Mother Tongue - 279 Words
    Mother Tongue Not all people who speak the English language speak it the same way. A language can be subdivided into any number of dialects which each vary in some way from the parent English language. “Mother Tongue,” an article based on the power of language; without standard language skills, one is identified as an outsider, often wrongly perceived and unfairly discriminated against. In the article Amy Tan describes her observation and thoughts about the use of the English language and...
    279 Words | 1 Page
  • Types of Languages essay - 1082 Words
     Types of Languages, Necessity and Example of Existence Juan Varela American Intercontinental University Online A very wise man once said “When a language dies, The divine things stars, sun and moon, the human things, thinking and feeling are no longer reflected in that mirror” (John Ross, 2005) Those are the words of Miguel Leon-Portilla, a well respected Mexican anthropologist and historian. Those words could not be further from the truth. A language is an entire system of...
    1,082 Words | 3 Pages
  • My Idiolect - 647 Words
    Explore how and why your own language varies in different contexts and consider how others react to your speech. During the 14 years of my life, I have learnt to adjust and familiarise my dialect to suit diverse situations through the impact of media, family, music and social networking. Moreover, I have come to pay special attention to the context of where someone is talking and the mode of how they are communicating. I have also gained the awareness of how others respond to features of my...
    647 Words | 2 Pages
  • idiolect - 616 Words
    Although, I am involved in my upbringing and I am greatly influenced by my family, neighbours and friends. I also inculcate my own experience and actions in life such as trying to adapt to situations to suit others. I feel that alongside with media and culture it boils down the main questions: do I change my language to adapt to its circumstances or speak to please people? And why do I do this? My idiolect began to be affected and form the way I was able to speak. My mother gave birth to me in...
    616 Words | 2 Pages
  • Difficulties in Learning English Language
    Learning different languages sounds a little tough. English is one of theses difficult languages. In some countries, learning English is very difficult because they start learning it in a late ages. Actually, learning English is difficult because of its various vocabularies, complicated grammar, and its hard accent. English language has a lot of words. These words are not easy to remember for most of English learners. Most English words have different parts of speech like...
    278 Words | 1 Page
  • Language and Age - 1030 Words
    From the very beginning when the first words were uttered, the ability to communicate has played an important role in our world. Words can hurt, heal, create, build and transform. Language is obviously a vital tool that unites people. Every nation has their dialect and specific slang that made them unique. The variations depend also on the age categories. In American society people of each generation have been adding new meanings and new words into the conversations in order to reflect the...
    1,030 Words | 3 Pages
  • language communities - 1110 Words
    ​​​Kayleigh Willis English 101 9/2/14 Essay 1 In Richard Lederer’s article “All American Dialects”, he states the ironic truth that “most of us are aware that large numbers of people in the U.S. speak very differently than we do.” (152) How is it that one...
    1,110 Words | 4 Pages
  • Idiolect Paper - 550 Words
    Reflect on some aspects of your own personal idiolect including perhaps some criticism made of it by adults. According to the ‘The Daily Mail’ children will try to adapt linguistically when in different environments. This was evident in section two; the police adult asks whether I would like a “glarss” of water, I consequently respond “I would love a glarss of water”. In the current age, in my eyes, it is seen to be more posh when adding the “ar” sound in substitute of an “a” sound. There are...
    550 Words | 2 Pages
  • Speech in Restaurants - 778 Words
    Speech Variation In Restaurants There are three different dialects in Pennsylvania that will give away where you reside. Why is there so much contrast in speech among the residents of the city and country? The culture where I am from has molded my speech, attitude, and actions; it also has created who I am today. The “city life” is exceptionally different from the “country life,” I know this because of my expedition to the middle of nowhere, Lock Haven, PA. Somewhere on the four-hour car...
    778 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sociolinguistics - 2390 Words
    An isogloss refers to a specific type of language border. It is the geographical boundary or delineation of a certain linguistic feature, e.g. the pronunciation of a vowel, the meaning of a word, or use of some syntactic feature. Major dialects are typically demarcated by whole bundles of isoglosses, e.g. the Benrath line that distinguishes High German from the other West Germanic languages; or the La Spezia-Rimini Line which divides the Northern Italian dialects from Central ones. One of the...
    2,390 Words | 6 Pages
  • How Does My Speech Change When Communicating with Different Audiences and How Does It Change the Way People Think of Me?
    CA- First Draft How does my speech change when communicating with different audiences and how does it change the way people think of me? George Orwell said-‘If thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought’ illustrating that the power of language over our thought. People change their register when communicating with different audiences unintentionally: including myself. In 15 years of my life, I have always adapted my idiolect differently to my friends, parents, teachers and...
    1,418 Words | 4 Pages
  • paper - 1428 Words
    Ms.Nancy&Ms.Scanlon FIQWS CHUXIN ZHENG 09/16/14 Annotated Bibliography Emerson, R.W. (2009, September 9). Chapter IV: language. from Nature; Addresses and Lectures. Retrieved September 15, 2014, from http://www.emersoncentral.com/language.htm In this chapter, author discusses the relationship between language and the nature. Word implies the objects in nature and word and nature represent spiritual realities. Then author explain how the word...
    1,428 Words | 4 Pages
  • American Tongues - 1020 Words
    In this film entitled "American Tongues", the basic message the viewer gets, is that many people have different dialects and that different people have different views about the people who speak them. Some of these views can be negative and offensive, while others can be positive and thoughtful. Regardless, we all can see that dialects have a huge impact on people's lives. In my paper, I will argue that people should learn a standard form of English as long as they are comfortable with it....
    1,020 Words | 3 Pages
  • Spoken Language - 1099 Words
    “Explore how you adapt aspects of your spoken language at home and at school.” My way of language and accent is different from place to place. In the last 15 years I have been speaking in two languages to communicate and now have become fluent. My family, friends, media and my national identity have had the biggest influence on my idiolect. With my family members I speak in different languages to show respect, I speak in English with my mom and sister and speak Pashto (my mother tongue) with...
    1,099 Words | 3 Pages
  • Language and Identity - 888 Words
    Language and Identity How and why are the chinese presented in a certain way in these series of articles? In many countries, people understand each other. In the United Kingdom, the English language is spoken as the primary language. Around 95% of the UK population understand and speak the language. In America, the most common used language is English. There are many languages such as Spanish, Indo-European and other Asian and Pacific Island languages, but the overall language is...
    888 Words | 3 Pages
  • Informal Language Has a Variety of Functions in Australian Society. What Do You See as Some of the Crucial Roles of Informal Language in Contemporary Australia?
    Informal language has a variety of functions in Australian society. What do you see as some of the crucial roles of informal language in contemporary Australia? Informal language has a variety of functions in Australian society. The main function of informal language has to do with Australia’s culture. Slang and informal language gives a sense of belonging, pride, mateship, informality and laid-backness, which is an accurate description of a typical Australian. In Australian society slang...
    296 Words | 1 Page
  • Postcolonial Language Debate - 613 Words
    The postcolonial language debate about African culture has become a big issue in determining if the African culture is actually being taught to younger generations. Some African writers believe that the culture of the African people is disappearing because all of the history books and novels written about African history and culture are in the English language. Other African scholars believe that they can finally break free from the postcolonial era by using English as a weapon. Chinue Achebe...
    613 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reflection of My Idiolect - 403 Words
    "Reflect on some aspects of your own personal talk (idiolect) Including perhaps some criticisms made of it by adults" Whilst completing this project on spoken language, I discovered aspects of my own personal speech (also known as idiolect) and the variation between people's language due to their culture and environment. Living in north London for fifteen years I have had many experiences which shapes my idiolect to what it is today. Three main factors which have influenced me the most are...
    403 Words | 2 Pages
  • Are today's kids killing the english language?
    The English language is a subject that has arisen as controversial over the last few decades. Many believe it is being slaughtered by the youth in our country while others believe that it is merely evolving to the ever changing world that we live in. Only one thing can be for sure though; it is defiantly something that is worth taking a deeper look at to get some true facts and opinions. In today's society the English language is viewed as an ever changing piece of communication that was once...
    892 Words | 3 Pages
  • Collins or Longman Dictionary - a Difficult Choice
    The choice of a dictionary – Collins or Longman? Nowadays many learners of English face a problem – which dictionary to choose as their main aid in learning the language. There is a variety of dictionaries from different publishers available at the market now, but we can focus here on two – Collins and Longman which are quite good reference books for everybody. Although they are both equally preferred by English learners, they posses a number of features which leave the buyer with not an...
    512 Words | 2 Pages
  • Importance of English - 428 Words
    English can be used as a language in any part of the world. This is because at least a few people in each locality would know the language. Though these people might not have the same accent as others, the language at least will be understandable. There are various reasons for the importance of English language. They are listed below. 1. Travel: When a person travels to another part of the world either for the sake of business or even as a tourist, the languages may differ. In these...
    428 Words | 1 Page
  • The Deception of Wild Animals (Language/Style Essay)
     The Deception of Wild Animals Throughout life, it may be examined that amongst varied species of organisms, there will always be a few who are singled out due to varied differences. For example, there was a study about how lizards that adopted the same hues as their environment survived against their predatory species, whereas lizards of vivid colors were ultimately, depleted from their environment. This process is more commonly known as natural selection. However, one might wonder if the...
    1,059 Words | 3 Pages
  • How to Tame a Wild Tongue/Mother Tongue
    What’s makes someone an American? Am I more American because my skin is white and I speak perfect English? Or am I more American because my family immigrated here 100 years earlier than most? Our country is a melting pot of different races, backgrounds and beliefs. Two women, who are the children of immigrants, share their stories of growing up in America. The first is Gloria Anzaldua, a Chicana who grew up in South Texas. The first chapter of her book, Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza...
    800 Words | 2 Pages
  • Discuss the Ways in Which the Language Used Shows the Closeness of the Relationships Between Participants.
    Discuss the ways in which the language used shows the closeness of the relationships between participants. In this essay, I am going to explore how the language used shows the closeness of the relationships between the participants, and how their friendship is shown. In the friendship context, speech is more relaxed and casual and there is more use of dialect and colloquialisms than if it were a formal situation. There is also the use of words and phrases which could only be understood in this...
    378 Words | 1 Page
  • Acronyms, Idioms and Slang: the Evolution of the English Language.
    Acronyms, Idioms and Slang: the Evolution of the English Language. Although the English language is only 1500 years old, it has evolved at an incredible rate: so much so, that, at first glance, the average person in America today would find most Shakespearean literature confusing without the aid of an Old-English dictionary or Cliff's Notes. Yet Shakespear lived just 300 years ago! Some are seeing this is a sign of the decline of the English language, that people are becoming less and less...
    1,225 Words | 4 Pages
  • Are You Down with Slang?
    Are You Down With Slang? The English language is one of the most diverse if not the most diverse language in the world. It is spoken in many countries and spoken with different dialects within those countries. Ranging from different pronunciations to completely different meanings for words. Flip-flops in America are known as thongs in Australia and tap in Britain is a faucet in America. Each country also has its own form of slang that other English speaking countries may not understand. Slang...
    1,070 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ways to Improve Your English Speaking
    English speaking has many values and is important for people in every country, people who meet with different people and share different culture. English language is going up the national border of its origin in this century. There are lots of benefits to learn language and English speaking. Firstly, the English grammar. The English language is very important to be able to communicate in every part of the world. If you want to speak English fluently, you must have the knowledge of English...
    212 Words | 1 Page
  • My Idiolect - 1255 Words
    During the span of my life till today, I have experienced many circumstances which has shaped the way I think and my overall personality and morals, these have structured my idiolect in today’s society, there are many influences in my life that have shaped me, such as my family, culture, friends and media (internet or TV) . Although I am immerse by my upbringing and I am greatly influenced by the family, neighbors and friends, I also inculcate my own experiences and actions in life. Such as...
    1,255 Words | 3 Pages
  • spoken language - 294 Words
    Our spoken language has changed a lot over the years, words we use know probably would not make any sense to those who live years ago. Simple phrases such as “sick” would normally describe a person who is ill, however as it has become a big part of the teenage vocabulary the meaning has been adapted and changed to showing something that is cool and amazing. Also our spoken language changes depending on our situation or the environment around us. We talk to certain people in different ways, such...
    294 Words | 1 Page
  • Regional And Social Variation - 2038 Words
    REGIONAL AND SOCIAL VARIATION IN BALI BY: I MADE PUTRA WIDIASMARA 1101305047 ENGLISH DEPARTMENT, FACULTY OF LETTERS AND CULTURES, UDAYANA UNIVERSITY 2014 1. Introduction 1.1 Background "The term sociolinguistics is used generally for the study of the relationship between language and society" (Yule, 2006, p.205). Sociolinguistics is a branch of applied linguistics which studies the language in relation to social elements; it is the study of relationships between language and social and...
    2,038 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Evolution of English - 413 Words
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  • BLABLABLA - 719 Words
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  • Language Features in Different Context
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  • My Work - 1832 Words
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  • English as a Global Language - 276 Words
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  • Controlled Assessment Draft - 1316 Words
    Explore the ways your own spoken language is adapted in different situations and how the attitudes of others influences these adaptation. The way people speak can be influenced by a multitude of factors; be it the environment they grew up in or the people they socialise with. The media, education, class system, location of birth and where I live have directly influenced my personal idiolect. I was born in Leicester. People in Leicester have a very distinct accent and dialect and during my...
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  • Importance of English in Every Onces Life
    What Is the Place And Importance Of English In Daily Life? To anyone who lives in an English speaking country, it is of vital importance. Language is always very important, because it is the communication. If you cannot speak the language of a place, it will be very difficult to communicate with the people. And so it is an absolute neccesity.We communicate with others every day. Whether we just say 'hello' or have a long conversation, or whether we give or follow instructions, or weather at...
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  • Personal Response - 362 Words
    ‘’ Riding the crest of globalization and technology, English dominates the world as no other language ever has, and some linguists now say it may never be dethroned as the king of languages.’’ In the world there is a huge amount of different languages that we can use to express or communicate. The stimulus mentioned above refers English as the mainly language spoken all over the world which will probably never disappear, but how far do people agree with that? Firstly, it is true that...
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  • Written and Spoken English Language
    Written and Spoken English Language The English language consists both of written and spoken features. Until recently, items and structures most typically found in spoken language have not been fully described. Most grammars of English have had a bias towards the written language. They are many differences between spoken and written English. Text A and B show written and spoken versions of an account of a days activities. Text A is a written account of these activities, while Text B is a...
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  • Power and Authority that affects English Language
    All languages change over time, and vary from place to place. In my opinion, English language is the most influenced by the change. I must say lots of factors affect language. It may be because of political or social pressures, such us invasions, imigration and colonisation. It may also change because of latest inventions, such as transport, domestic appliances and industrial equipment, or new sports and entertainment, because they also need new vocabluary. But, language can change by less...
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  • Describe the difference between langua
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  • Summary Of Speech And Writing In Investigating English Discourse Book By Ronald Charter
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  • Why People Hate Lier
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  • On English Language Teaching in China and Cultural Awareness Education
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  • Vernacular Languages - 788 Words
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  • Oral English Communication - 2659 Words
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  • English Controlled Assessment spoken language
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  • Importance of Language - 662 Words
    Ricky Nguyen Watkins AP Lang 15 October 2013 The Importance of Language Every day and every hour we hear words, letters and phrases: these are the means of communication between me and another person. If we both speak the same language we can connect on another level, versus someone who speaks a completely different language than me. English, my primary language, has been part of me since the day I was born, but another language, Vietnamese, has been part of my grandpa’s life since the...
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  • Code-Switching Essay - 898 Words
    Teaching Code-Switching My momma is a fluent code-switcher. Her ability to seamlessly code-switch from one mode to another confused my sisters and me and endlessly amused my father. “Why is Momma talking like that?” we would ask. “The closer we get to Parsons, the more ‘countrified’ your momma gets,” he’d say with a gleeful chuckle, patting her affectionately on the knee. My momma grew up in a small farming community in Parsons, Tennessee, where the local dialect...
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  • trainspotting - 1571 Words
    Choose one short chapter of Trainspotting. Consider Welsh's use of narrative position in that section and discuss language use (dialect, accent, taboo words) Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh is a novel based around the drug culture of Edinburgh in the 1980’s. Structured around the lives of five, male heroin addicts, the novel is assembled by a series of short stories that are tied together by characterization. The readers follow the lives of those who have chosen to drop out of polite society, as...
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  • Topics of Cultural History - 615 Words
     Vernacular Languages During The Renaissance Pauline Charles American Intercontinental University Online ABSTRACT Vernacular language is a tool we use to communicate both verbally and in writing. People can express their thoughts, feelings and emotions through knowledge, ideas and memory. Before there was vernacular language, people only knew how to communicate in Latin but now, there’s many languages in different countries. If a person could speak...
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  • Diglossia: Variety and Speech Community
    Diglossia is the relationship between two or more codified dialects that are used in the same speech community under different circumstances. Diglossia is categorised into two important hallmarks, the (H) high function which is seen as the superior dialect that is based on a grammatical system. It is formalised of rules, hence allowing thoughts and ideas to be expressed logically. However, the (L) function is connected to the standardised language of the speech community. It is used to express...
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  • Interaction of Language and Culture - 826 Words
    The Interaction of Language and Culture Language has a deep connection into our daily life and is fundamental to our culture; it's hard to imagine life without using a language. In fact, language plays a big role when a person is trying to convey his/hers thoughts. Languages are different from one another in innumerable ways, just because people talk differently does not necessarily mean that they think differently. However, according to Edward Spair and Benjamin Whorf, language can shape...
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  • Idiolect - 649 Words
    A person’s idiolect is their unique way of speaking. This consists of things such as accent, vocabulary, grammar and non-verbal communication and is influenced by things such as the region they live in, age, personal experiences, age, occupation and social groups they belong to. Growing up in Newquay during the 70’s, having moved from Indian Queens, with the town still retaining a mostly Cornish community I inevitably acquired a Cornish accent. Despite my upbringing I don’t think I speak with...
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  • Australia Is Losing Its Language to Americanisms.
    'Australian English is losing its unique characteristics to Americanisms and gradually dying' Australian English is a very interesting language, It has many features that makes it unique. Some believe that these unique features are being slowly killed by Americanisms assimilating into our language. This theory, believe it or not, is untrue. Americanisms in Australia withhold an extremely small area in mainly our lexicon and some morphology, with all other features of our language left...
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  • idiolect - 1026 Words
     Louise Bassenger 9C How do I adapt my dialect to certain situations? For a while, I have been studying my speech syntax. I have noticed that in certain situations, my idiolect adapts and alters slightly. There are many words that I frequently use and others that tend to appear in certain conversations, but disappear in others. I have an accent which is a mix between Kent and Essex, as I moved from Essex to Kent, and - from my sociolect - have picked up the Kentish accent in addition to my...
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  • Explore Some Aspects of the Ways Your Speech Changes According to the Context You Are in.
    Explore some aspects of the ways your speech changes according to the context you are in. Recently it has become clear to me that I have not been using my speech in a particularly high register, this shows me that maybe I am not using my speech in a good enough way. I have found that my idiolect varies when I am in different situations this may be due to the company that I am in. you tend to hear a change within my speech especially when in a sociolect group of friends, when I listened to a...
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  • Work Cited - 1843 Words
     March 17, 2006 It's Not the Sights, It's the Sounds By TIM SULTAN I WANTED to kiss Lori Austin, the waitress behind the counter of August 25, a diner near Wales Center, N.Y. I had been pretending to look at the wall art — a sunset landscape painted on a circular saw — but was actually straining to listen in on the conversation three elderly women were having at a nearby table. I was not having any success. The more I listened, the more quietly they talked. "Thee-at painting?" Ms....
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  • LANGUAGE ESSAY - 455 Words
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  • Importance of English Language - 324 Words
    e new ordinance A. Yon Jensvold - Well I believe that things will generally improve for us, and especially the local Importance of English Language in Our Life sector. All in all, this will move things forward and drive the economy of the region to greater heights. This is what we need: to put Importance of English Language in Our Life money in people's pockets. Q. A great response, Yon Jensvold, let's move to the more murky territory of Importance of English Language in Our Life law. Yon...
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  • The German Refugee - 271 Words
    Mel Carter In “ The German Refugee” by Bernard Malamud, we have character named Oskar Gasnerr, who is a German- Jewish refugee, escaping from German Nazis and comes to America, where he has no kins and he can not speak the English language properly. He is supposed to give a lecture in English, which is too hard for him to do. Apart from having to talk a language he can’t, he is also detachted from her own counrty and family, and have economical and social difficulties there. No...
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  • Synthesis Essay - 537 Words
    Synthesis Essay In today’s society, language is one of the most important and most used things in everyday life. Language is one of the most effective and efficient ways of communicating with one another, animals, and God. It can be used as a mirror, tool, or a weapon. The reason I think language can be used as a mirror is because people use language to directly reflect who they are as a person. For example, if you have heard someone using improper grammar or slang, it may lead you to...
    537 Words | 2 Pages
  • Language Death - 1034 Words
    Language Evolution From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Contents 1. The Nature of Language Development 2. Uneven Development 3. National Language and Its Variants 4. Rationale The Nature of Language Development Language develops slowly, continuously, without sudden leaps and bounds. The development of language is not the way to destroy the existing language and create new language, which according to the path of development and improvement of the basic elements of the existing...
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  • Idiolect - 534 Words
    Idiolect – language of an individual Idiolect (coined by linguist Bernard Bloch: from Greek idio (personal, private) + (dia) lect) is a variant of the language used by one person, the distinctive speech of an individual, considered as a linguistic pattern unique among speakers of his or her language or dialect [6]. It is expressed in specific principles of word choice and grammatical features, as well as in words, expressions, idioms and pronunciation, which is specific to a given person....
    534 Words | 2 Pages
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God Study Guide
    Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston Literature Guide Developed by Kristen Bowers for Secondary Solutions® ISBN 0-9772295-4-8 © 2006 Secondary Solutions. All rights reserved. A classroom teacher who has purchased this guide may photocopy the materials in this publication for his/her classroom use only. Use or reproduction by a part of or an entire school or school system, by for-profit tutoring centers and like institutions, or for commercial sale, is strictly...
    927 Words | 4 Pages


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