Coral reef Essays & Research Papers

Best Coral reef Essays

  • Coral Reefs - 476 Words
    Topic: “Describe the way in which coral reefs have contributed to social and cultural life in the Caribbean.” Corals are marine animals which usually live in compact colonies of many identical polyps. Corals secrete calcium carbonate which forms reefs. Such reefs and are located near the Equator in tropical and subtropical waters. The largest coral reef is the Great Barrier Reef located off the coast of Queensland, Australia. Coral reefs are often referred to as the “rainforests of the...
    476 Words | 2 Pages
  • coral reefs - 300 Words
    Coral Reefs Coral reefs are extraordinary animals and I never realized that they play an important role for multiple species in the ocean, until I watched the movie called The Blue Planet on coral reefs. Coral reefs are specialist species because they can only develop in shallow warm tropical water. Corals develop in shallow water because they depend on algae for oxygen and algae requires direct sunlight. Because Coral reefs are specialist species, spacing is very limited and ...
    300 Words | 0 Page
  • Coral Reefs - 2040 Words
    Topic :Coral Reefs Grade 10 subject: Geography Table of Contexts What is a Coral Reef? Where are they located? Types of coral reefs Other types of coral reefs Man’s impact on the coral reef Rehabilitation of Coral Reefs Bibliography What is a Coral reef? Coral reefs are underwater structures made from calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of tiny animals found in marine waters that contain few...
    2,040 Words | 7 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 1391 Words
    Coral reefs are arguably the world's most beautiful habitats. Coral reefs have been called the rainforests of the oceans, because of the rich diversity of life they support. Scientists have not yet finished counting the thousands of different species of plants and animals that use or live in the coral reef. There are three types of coral reefs: fringing reefs, barrier reefs, and atolls. Fringing reefs are located close to shore, separated from land by only shallow water. Barrier reefs lie...
    1,391 Words | 4 Pages
  • All Coral reef Essays

  • Coral Reefs - 949 Words
    CORAL REEFS ← Coral reefs are living things made of coral polyps. Coral reefs are large strips of wave-resistant coral rocks built up by carbonate organisms lying close to the surface of the sea and even sometimes rising above the sea level. In the Caribbean, there are generally three types of coral reefs: ← Barrier reefs are to be found parallel to the coast and are usually separated by a shallow but wide area of water called a lagoon. Belize has one of the second largest...
    949 Words | 5 Pages
  • Coral Reef - 2578 Words
    CORAL REEFS Almost every one of us have heard and most of you have seen the Coral reefs but did you know what actually these are: As a mariner its important to know about the marine life, that was one reason I have chosen this topic for my today's short presentation. GM, my scheme of presentation will be as flashed: DEFINATION OF CORAL REEF DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CORAL AND CORAL POLYP WHERE WE CAN FIND CORAL CONSTRUCTION OF CORAL REEFS CONDITIONS FOR GROWTH OF CORAL REEFS TYPES...
    2,578 Words | 8 Pages
  • Coral Reef - 724 Words
    Darryl Shivers Coral Reef Ecosystem Coral reefs are complex and diverse habitat. Perhaps one of the most interesting and colorful ecosystems to be found in the marine environment. They are very unique in many ways. Coral reefs play many important roles in the marine world. Lots of different sea life rely on reefs for habitat and sources of food, including some endangered species. (Yasutake, 2007) The reef we will be discussing is the great barrier reef of Australia. This is the...
    724 Words | 3 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 759 Words
    Coral & Coral Reefs Introduction Coral needs light to thrive and grow, but they grow faster in clean water. The largest coral reef in the world is the Great Barrier Reef located off north western Australia. This reef covers 135,000 square miles. There are a wide variety of coral. They all have unbelievable fun facts, unusual habitats, unique characteristics, and interesting behaviors. Fun Facts There are many unbelievable fun facts about coral. Coral are small creatures, that often...
    759 Words | 3 Pages
  • Coral Reef - 1909 Words
    Coral reefs have existed on this planet for approximately 450 million years. They provide an extremely diverse marine ecosystem. (Bellwood and Wainwirght2002) Coral reefs are the largest natural structures in the world and occur in over 100 countries. They are the result of a remarkable relationship between coral animals and microscopic algae. The microscopic algae (zooxanthellae) coverts sunlight and carbon dioxide into oxygen (photosynthesis) and carbohydrates for the coral animals (polyps)...
    1,909 Words | 6 Pages
  • Coral Reef - 799 Words
    SangHoon Kang Period 5 AP Environmental Science Mr. KrupensHow Can We Preserve the World’s Coral Reefs Critical Thinking Questions and AnswersHow does the current state of the world’s coral reefs illustrate each of the six key themes of this book? Human population: With current state of coral reefs, we are definitely valuing the quality of life of a person living today because of the fact that coral reefs are indirectly, sometimes directly, destroyed by over fishing using the methods such...
    799 Words | 3 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 372 Words
    Coral reefs are one of the most biologically diverse ecosystems on earth. They are made up not only of hard and soft corals, but also sponges, crustaceans, mollusks, fish, sea turtles, sharks, dolphins and much more. Reef systems serve as barriers protecting many coastal populations and developments from storm damage; they support commercial fisheries; they serve as major tourist attractions; and they hold the possibility of unimagined medicinal compounds in the diverse life forms within them...
    372 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 501 Words
    What are Coral Reefs? Coral reefs are reefs consisted of coral consolidated into limestone. They are made of thin layers of calcium carbonate. Stony corals, or scleractinians, are the corals primarily responsible for laying the foundations of, and building up, reef structures. Immense reef structures are formed when each individual stony coral organism, or polyp, secretes a skeleton of calcium carbonate. How are corals classified? Corals are classified as animals although they may resemble...
    501 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 1147 Words
    This is a piece of expository writing about coral reefs. I taught it fitting to write on coral reefs because they are so important and are getting destroyed every day. Coral reefs are underwater structures made from calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of tiny animals found in marine waters that contain few nutrients. Most coral reefs are built from stony corals, which in turn consist of polyps that cluster in groups. Living coral reefs are the foundation for many...
    1,147 Words | 3 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 490 Words
    CORAL REEFS Coral reefs are the most diverse and beautiful of all marine habitats. It is an underwater ecosystem, a community of living organisms. They are the largest animal-made structures in the world. It is made up of plants, fishes, and many other creatures. They are home to about 25% of all marine life! Coral reefs are made of tiny animals called “polyps” that stay fixed in one place and are the main structure of a reef. Polyps have a hard outer skeleton made of calcium (similar to a...
    490 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 1560 Words
    Coral Reefs Coral reefs are one of the most biologically diverse ecosystems on the planet. “ Coral reefs cover an area of less than a quarter of one percent of all the earth's marine environment, yet they are one of the world's most diverse habitats, supporting one third of all fish species, and have been growing in the world's oceans for 450 million years”(Taylor). Although the coral reef ecosystems are such a small part of our planet they provide millions of jobs, food, and perhaps most...
    1,560 Words | 4 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 356 Words
    Coral Reefs Last week I started to work on my research about coral reefs, and I realized how important they are. Coral reefs are the most various and beautiful of all nautical habitats. However, it's colorful plants and there are three different kinds of coral reefs. In my opinion, I think coral reefs should be preserved instead of being victim by tourists for their own benefits. They will inevitably demolish coral reefs. In this essay I will mention two things; facts about coral reefs and...
    356 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 1240 Words
    Jeannita BonneAnnee Bio 101 Dr. Ferdinand April 6, 2014 Coral Reefs If you’re looking for biodiversity than look no further than the coral reef, coral reefs are typically located in tropical oceans, near the equator, and due to their use as shelter are often the homes of many different types of animals. According to defenders.org “Reefs in the Florida Keys, for example, hold at least 45 species of stony coral, 37 species of octocoral, five species of sea turtles, 500 species of...
    1,240 Words | 4 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 1017 Words
    Coral Reefs Review of the Literature What are Coral Reefs? Coral reefs are said to be the foundation for many marine species, and are a crucial support for human life. The coral reef ecosystem is an a diverse collection of species that interact with each other and the physical environment. Coral reefs are the homes of many species including crabs, shrimp, oysters, and clams, foods eaten by humans on a daily basis. Coral reefs are among the most diverse and biologically complex...
    1,017 Words | 4 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 1701 Words
    Coral Reefs the Rain Forests of the Sea Corals are found all over the ocean but mainly in Southern Asia waters. Coral reefs are estimated to cover 284,300 km2 just under 0.1% of the oceans' surface area. The Indo Pacific region including the Red Sea, Indian Ocean, Southeast Asia and the Pacific account for 91.9% of this total and the Atlantic and Caribbean coral reefs account for 7.6%. Although corals exist both in temperate and tropical waters, shallow-water reefs form only in a zone...
    1,701 Words | 5 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - 392 Words
    Coralbots…will they help? MADILYN PHILLIPS People of all different ages love to visit the beach. As teen girls tan, parents gossip, and little ones splash around in the water they think of how beautiful the ocean is splashing on the shore. However they don’t think of what is at the bottom of the ocean. Not many people know that what is at the bottom of the ocean is as equally beautiful as the top. Unfortunately if something isn’t done soon this beauty of nature will be destroyed. In Meera...
    392 Words | 1 Page
  • Coral reef - 678 Words
    Phase 1 Individual Project Kathrina Nguyen SCI201-1404A-13 Environmental Science and Sustainability Coral reef Coral reefs are beautifully seen in shallow areas, such as the Australia’s eastern coast, also known as the “The Great Barrier Reef”. The reef covers an area over 300,000 square kilometers. Amazingly enough, the Great Barrier Reef also covers wide range of ocean depth. People consider that the coral reef is the most complex ecosystem on Earth. Abiotic Components There are...
    678 Words | 3 Pages
  • Coral Reef Biome - 532 Words
    Bio 9/12/10 Coral Reef Biome Though not considered a major biome, coral reefs qualify by definition. Coral reefs are marine ecosystems located within clear, shallow water. These reefs require water between 25 and 31 degrees Celsius, and do well in water with a salinity of 34 and 37 parts per 1000. These conditions are most often found within 30 degrees latitude of the equator, or in other words, the tropics. As the name suggests, corral reefs are formed by colonies of coral polyps. Coral...
    532 Words | 2 Pages
  • Endangerment of Coral Reefs - 1704 Words
    Endangerment of Coral Reefs Bernardshan (Ben) Mohan 210168680 SC/NATs 1840 Science, Technology and the Environment Ron Chopowick Rosalyne November 25, 2009 Coral reefs are considered to be the rainforest of the oceans and arguably the most beautiful habitat in the world. Coral reefs are underwater ecosystems where many species such as fish, marine plants, sponges, algae thrive on. As the text, Living in the Environment describes it: coral reefs “are among the world’s oldest, most...
    1,704 Words | 5 Pages
  • Coral Reef Zoology - 1128 Words
    Coral Reefs: Coral reefs are underwater structures made from calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of tiny animals found in marine waters that contain few nutrients. Most coral reefs are built from stony corals, which in turn consist of polyps that cluster in groups. The polyps belong to a group of animals known as Cnidaria, which also includes sea anemones and jellyfish. Unlike sea anemones, coral polyps secrete hard carbonate exoskeletons which support and protect...
    1,128 Words | 4 Pages
  • Coral Reef and Australia - 587 Words
    The great outback! Hey mate! Ever wanted to take an adventurous trip somewhere, but you’re not sure where? Well Australia would be the perfect place to start! Three reasons why Australia should be the first place you visit are for starters, the amazing scenery and beauty of the country, Secondly the exquisite variety of food, and lastly, the unique culture. Australia has one of the most breath taking sceneries in the world, all the way from the Great Barrier Reef to the city of...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coral Reef Decrease - 733 Words
    The Decrease of Coral Reefs Taylah Bruce Science 10.3 The Decrease of Coral Reefs In Australia, particularly, the rapid decrease of coral is becoming a vast issue. Our most prominent body of coral, The Great Barrier Reef, is facing annual bleaching within the next twenty years due to warmer, more acidic seas. It has alerted scientists all over the world of the future we face and many have come together in hope of conserving this amazing natural wonder and the millions of marine life that...
    733 Words | 3 Pages
  • Are Coral Reefs in Danger?
    Abstract Located in tropical ocean waters, coral reefs provide priceless resources to both human and marine life. The leading natural cause of destruction among the coral reefs is global warming. Other natural causes are earthquakes, hurricanes, cyclones, and typhoons. The destruction to the coral reefs from these natural disasters is minimal compared to the dangers caused by man. Man-made destruction has a much wider impact on the health of the coral reefs. This destruction includes...
    805 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Advantages of Coral Reefs for Human
    The Advantages of Coral Reef for Human Coral reefs are among the most ancient of earth`s natural wonders. It is because they are the most biologically diverse ecosystem on the planet. Coral reefs are second only to the great rain forest of the world. Coral reefs are aptly and often referred to as “rain forest of the sea”, because of the diversity marine creatures that llived in coral reef. Many people mistakenly think of coral reef as inanimate rock formations, however coral...
    1,543 Words | 4 Pages
  • Coral Reefs - An ecosystem at risk
    ECOSYSTEMS AT RISK – CASE STUDY 2 PART 1: CORAL REEFS – OVERVIEW Coral reefs are often referred to as “the rainforests of the sea” because of they form some of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth. Its massive structure is formed from coral polyps (tiny animals that live in colonies) that support approximately 25% of all known marine species by providing essential habitats. Factors affecting reef development and survival include temperature, light, sedimentation and salinity of the water....
    2,422 Words | 7 Pages
  • Coral Reef Destruction - 1098 Words
    Claudia Valdez Anthropology 1 M&W Coral Reef Destruction They can be found in all three of the Earth’s oceans, scattered throughout 109 countries. Ancient natural masterpieces formed by a variety of delicate lime secreting coral polyps. The oldest discovered reef was formed over 500 million years ago, which makes it one of the oldest ecosystems to exist. Little is known about the lifespan of coral colonies but they have been known to...
    1,098 Words | 3 Pages
  • Coral Reefs and Bleaching Phenomenon
    Imagine yourself observing one of the most diverse ecosystems on earth. Thousands of species of plants and animals provide a dizzying array of color and motion. Massive structures provide a canopy that shelters hundreds of exotic species in a myriad of microclimates. As land-based observers, we almost automatically assume that this is a description of the rich ecosystem of a tropical rainforest. However, if we take ourselves off the safety of dry land and immerse ourselves in the ocean, we...
    1,486 Words | 4 Pages
  • Safeguarding Coral Reefs - 925 Words
    * Coral reefs are underwater structures made from calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of tiny animals found in marine waters that contain few nutrients. Most coral reefs are built from stony corals, which in turn consist of polyps that cluster in groups. The polyps are like tiny sea anemones, to which they are closely related. * Coral reef ecosystems support a variety of human needs. They are important for subsistence, fisheries, tourism, shoreline protection,...
    925 Words | 3 Pages
  • Coral Reef Destruction - 444 Words
    The oceans today are 30 percent more acidic than they were at the time of the Industrial Revolution. This interferes with the way that corals produce calcium carbonate, and it becomes difficult to build reefs. Oil spills are a major issue, and in recent accidents; ships hit coral reefs off India and spilt oil, causing reef damage. Surface currents are more rapid than the currents of the deep sea, limiting the ability of the deeper plumes (oil) to spread widely; oil and chemicals will diffuse...
    444 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coral Reefs in the Caribbean - 425 Words
    Caribbean Studies Describe the value of Coral Reefs to Caribbean society and culture. Coral Reefs are the home of more than one quarter of all known marine fish species and tens of thousands of other species. The Caribbean coral reefs are vital and valuable natural resources that contain a wealth of biodiversity including over 60 species of coral and 1,500 different species of fish – many of which are found nowhere else on earth. Coral reefs provide both a good and a service to many...
    425 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Current Status of Indonesia's Coral Reef
    Beauty of the ocean is adored by many people. The multi-colors of the corals, the unique sea creatures and many more have been candy for the eyes and inspiring to the people. But if people like it so much, why do they let it slowly disappear? Right now Indonesia's Coral Reefs are decreasing in a rapid pace. The main causes are dynamite fishing and demands of reef products. According to the Oceanology Study and Development Centre of the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), 70% of...
    505 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coral Reefs, Our Disappearing Beauty
    Coral Reefs, Our Disappearing Beauty Coral reefs are one of nature's riches ecosystems with a diverse existence of life which is ultimately quite complex. They are a colorful ecosystem that plays an important role in the marine world and the human world as well. They are home to countless plants and animals, a source of food, medicines and one of the unique wonders of our world. While they might bring the image of life near a tropical paradise, there is much more to the coral reef...
    1,748 Words | 5 Pages
  • Coral Reefs Salt Marshes Mangroves
    Salt Marshes,Mangroves,and Coral Reefs Salt Marshes • Salt marshes are found along low lying coastlines where boggy ground is flooded by sea water either daily or less frequently. • Many UK salt marshes have been reclaimed for farm land, but those that remain provide valuable habitats where salt-tolerant plants grow and birds nest. Salt marshes also pay a vital role for coastal protection, they contain creeks which allow tidal waters to flow both in and out which reduces the wave...
    348 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bleaching Away the Beauty of Coral Reefs
    Bleaching Away the Beauty of Coral Reefs Pretend you are about to go scuba diving in the ocean. You jump in the water and begin to sink down. As you start surveying the coral reefs around you, something catches your eye. The coral has turned white, and no longer moves with life. This whiteness seems to have spread over a large area of the reef. You no longer see the colorful branches swaying in the current, or the schools of tropical fish swimming through the leaves. This death-ridden...
    2,340 Words | 7 Pages
  • CHARLES DARWIN THEORY OF CORAL REEFS
    CHARLES DARWIN THEORY OF CORAL REEFS Darwin spent most of his coral reef explorations in the Indo-Pacific region, and viewed the three types of coral reefs he described as simply different stages in the geological 'evolution" of Pacific oceanic islands. Darwin theorized that fringing reefs began to grow near the shorelines of new islands as ecological conditions became ideal for hard coral growth. Then, as the island began to gradually subside into the sea, the coral was able to keep pace in...
    184 Words | 1 Page
  • Reef - 53277 Words
    PHILREEFS SECOND OF A SERIES philippine coral reefs through time workshop proceedings second of the atlas of philippine coral reefs series by Coral Reef Information Network of the Philippines (PhilReefs) and the University of the Philippines Marine Science Institute 2003 Series Editor Porfirio M. Aliño Workshop Organizers Andre J. Uychiaoco Porfirio M. Aliño Wilfredo Y. Licuanan Editorial Team Andre J. Uychiaoco Melchor R. Deocadez Domingo Ochavillo Christine D. Collantes ISBN...
    53,277 Words | 189 Pages
  • Coral. - 4602 Words
    The coral reef structure also buffers shorelines against waves, storms, and floods, helping to prevent loss of life, property damage, and erosion. Several million people live in U.S. coastal areas adjacent to or near coral reefs, and the well-being of their communities and economies is directly dependent on the health of nearby coral reefs. Reefs also protect the highly productive mangrove fisheries and wetlands along the coast, as well as ports and harbors and the economies they support....
    4,602 Words | 13 Pages
  • Climate Change, Coral Bleaching and the Future of the World's Coral Reefs
    CLIMATE CHANGE CORAL BLEACHING and the FUTURE of the WORLDÕS CORAL REEFS by O V E H O E G H Ð G U L D B E R G ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY DIRECTOR, THE CORAL REEF RESEARCH INSTITUTE, UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY ISBN 90-73361-52-4 Sea temperatures in the tropics have increased by almost 1oC over the past 100 years and are currently increasing at the rate of approximately 1-2oC per century. Reefbuilding corals, which are central to...
    24,988 Words | 84 Pages
  • Caribbean Studies Internal Assessment: Coral Reefs
    CHAPTER TWO: THE LITERATURE REVIEW CHAPTER TWO: THE LITERATURE REVIEW Coral reefs have been dubbed the ‘gardens of the sea.’ Burke and Maidens (2004) describe them as both physical structures and complex ecosystems. The physical structure is formed from the secretions of calcium carbonate by tiny marine organisms called coral polyps, which forms a shell around them (Mohammed, 2007). These shells become cemented together and remain when the reef building polyps die. The basic units of reef...
    1,045 Words | 3 Pages
  • Coral Reefs: Destroying Ancient Beauty, an Ethical Problem
    Ben Goodman Professor Eichoefer Honors Ethics May 3, 2010 PO Box #6334 Coral Reefs: Destroying Ancient Beauty, an Ethical Problem Coral reefs are some of the world’s liveliest, diverse, and most remarkable ecosystems on the planet. From the most well known Great Barrier reef, to other reefs that occupy seashores, coral reefs remain one of the world’s natural habitats that rival the rainforests in their longevity and life. Something that has seemingly been taken advantage of...
    2,542 Words | 7 Pages
  • Current and Future Status of Coral Reefs in Malaysia
     Current and Future Status of Coral Reefs in Malaysia Abstract: Coral reefs, also known as the rainforest of ocean, are the most productive and biologically rich ecosystem on earth (McAllister, 1995). Coral reefs are an important source of food and income to millions of people that are living near coast (Burke, et al., 2002). There are about 540 species of hard corals that have been identified in Malaysia in total and there are more than 90% of the country’s reefs are situated off the...
    6,189 Words | 16 Pages
  • Effects of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reef Systems
    Discussion Section-1 November 17, 2011 The other CO₂ Problem Todays oceans are not the same as they once were prior to the industrial revolution. The ocean serves as a reservoir for the worlds green house gasses. The increase in anthropogenic CO₂ has also resulted in an increase in the uptake by the ocean of CO₂. As a result of this uptake, the ocean is becoming progressively more and more acidic. This acidification of the ocean is expected to have great impacts on marine ecosystems....
    1,243 Words | 4 Pages
  • Decline of Coral Reefs Academic Writing Outline
    Academic Writing Final Piece Outline Stefano Phillips Topic: Ecosystem Focused topic: Decline of Coral Reefs Thesis Statement: Caribbean waters which contains coral reefs, one of the world’s most stunning, interesting and dynamic ecosystems, is diminishing rapidly due to pollution, overfishing and climate change. I. Pollution has greatly led to the decline in coral reefs. * Sources of pollution to coral reefs. 1. Land based pollution that runs into the sea is a major threat to...
    457 Words | 2 Pages
  • Environmental Effects of Tourism on Thai Coral Reefs
    The tourism industry has grown exponentially over the previous twenty years, it is now a worldwide industry, both in terms of tourists and host destinations, and ‘is no longer confined to the developed countries that traditionally provided the demand for world travel’ (Page & Connell, 2006, pp.4). World leaders have long been recognising the huge economic advantages that a booming tourism industry can bring to their nations, and vast amounts of money have been invested set up the infrastructure...
    3,477 Words | 9 Pages
  • Research Paper(AIDS and HIV in Africa & Coral Reefs)
    AIDS and HIV are very serious problems in Africa. Over 75 percent of the people living with HIV live in Sub-Saharan Africa. There are more than 25 million people living in Sub-Saharan Africa with HIV. As a result of multiple genetic studies, it is said that HIV in Africa came from chimpanzees that were butchered over 100 years ago for meat. HIV has two subtypes. HIV-1 is the most common and is related to the chimpanzees in Africa. Both HIV-1 and HIV-2 can both cause AIDS, however HIV-1...
    1,124 Words | 4 Pages
  • Restoration of Endangered Coral Reefs with Sunken Steel Cages
    In the article, “Sunken Steel Cages Could Save Coral Reefs”, Gaia Vince discusses that sunken steel cages may help restore endangered coral reefs. First, Vince explains how the steel cages are showing results for the endangered reefs. Carbon dioxide is above the level that it needs to be, and that is part of why coral reefs are going extinct. The metal cages do not fix that problem, but they appear to show results. The steel cages are connected to a long electrical cable that triggers a...
    356 Words | 1 Page
  • The Tragedy of the Commons Invading Our Environmental Rights Case Study: Coral Reefs
    10/27/04 Research in the Disciplines First Paper Final Draft Tragedy of the commons invading our environmental rights: Case study Coral Reefs In our world there are many resources, all of which people do not have a choice in sharing such as our air and our oceans. These resources are looked at as infinite, although this is not actually the case. Each time one person does something to pollute or use these types of resources, it affects the whole of society. This is the...
    2,036 Words | 6 Pages
  • Why Should We Conserve Our Coral Reefs Before Its Too Late?
    Why Should We Conserve Our Coral Reefs Before Its Too Late? The International Union for Conservation of Nature’s latest report warns that half of the coral reefs could disappear by 2045. Coral reefs are diverse ecosystems that support different kinds of fish species and other organisms under the sea. They are home to as many as 150,000 species in any given coral reef (Harris 1060). They are located in warm, shallow, and tropical marine waters where there is enough sunlight available for the...
    1,237 Words | 4 Pages
  • Coral Reef Pollution Can Hurt Bermuda's Tourism Industry
    Environment and Development in a Global Perspective State of the Environment Report Coral Reef Pollution Can Hurt Bermuda’s Tourism Industry Introduction Waste management techniques in Bermuda have adverse effects on the coral reefs and can hurt the island’s tourism industry. This is a state of the environment report on the islands of Bermuda that serves to shed light on the pollution of the coral reefs due to waste management problems and the subsequent potential adverse effects it can have...
    2,522 Words | 8 Pages
  • Great Barrier Reef: Impacts of Sea Temperature on Coral Bleaching
    As the climate changes, coral bleaching is predicted to become more frequent and severe. Sea temperature increases and coral stress from other impacts may increase corals' vulnerability to bleaching. As part of its Reef Health Incident Response System, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority has a Coral Bleaching Response Plan for detecting and responding to coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. What is coral bleaching Many types of coral have a special symbiotic relationship with a...
    314 Words | 1 Page
  • RESEARCH TOPIC: The effects of climate change on coral reef ecosystems
    RESEARCH TOPIC: The effects of climate change on coral reef ecosystems Wild, C., Hoegh-Guldberg, O., Naumann, M.S., Colombo-Pallotta, M.F., Ateweberhan, M., Fitt, W.K. Iglesias-Prieto, R., Palmer, C., Bythell, J.C., Ortiz, J.C., Loya, Y., and Van Woesik, R. (2011). Climate Change impedes scleractinian corals as primary reef ecosystem engineers. Marine and Freshwater Research, 62.2, 205-215. The article researches the effects of climate change on primary reef ecosystem engineers, such...
    266 Words | 1 Page
  • Coral Bleaching - 2630 Words
    Jenna Chemistry Honors Block 3 Coral Bleaching There are many ecological problems occurring currently on earth. We hear about ecological problems such as global warming, pollution and deforestation often. But coral bleaching, even though less mentioned is still a very serious ecological problem. Coral reefs are found in shallow tropical waters along the shores of islands and continents. A coral colony is made up of numerous individual coral polyps. A Coral reef is mainly composed of...
    2,630 Words | 7 Pages
  • Coral Bleaching - 799 Words
    English 2 Honors 31 May 2011 Coral Bleaching What is Coral bleaching? Coral bleaching is the whitening of corals due to expulsion or death of the protozoa’s pigment. The corals that form the structure of reef ecosystems of tropical seas depend upon a symbiotic relationship with unicellular protozoa, called zooxanthellae, which live within their tissues. Zooxanthellae give coral its coloration. Under stress, corals may release their zooxanthella, which causes the coral to...
    799 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tubbataha Reef - 471 Words
    The name “Tubbataha” comes from the Samal language meaning “long reef exposed at low tide”. Before Tubbataha became well known, the Samal – seafaring people of the southern Philippines – would visit the reefs intermittently, according to their nomadic lifestyle. However the people more tightly bound to Tubbataha are Cagayanons, inhabitants of the neighbouring islands of Cagayancillo. Traditionally, during the summer months when the sea was calm, they would sail in their native pangko, to visit...
    471 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cultivating Corals - 466 Words
    Alexis Nasca Mock Research Paper BIO 110 December 3, 2012 Title: Cultivating Corals Abstract: If one was to try to grow corals in order to build up a damaged reef, what would be the most effective, quick way to do it? Coral reefs are always facing hardships from natural and unnatural destructors, causing the percentage of reefs to diminish. Coral reefs have their own, natural, ways of rebuilding but sometimes, things need to be helped along in order to restore the ecosystem. In...
    466 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Study of Water Quality Near to a Coral Reef Site in the Region of Dubai, United Arab Emirates
    Canadian Journal on Chemical Engineering & Technology Vol. 3 No. 3, April 2012 A Study of Water Quality Near to a Coral Reef Site in the Region of Dubai, United Arab Emirates Rami El Khatib, Adnan Falah, Golaleh Tavakoli, Christine D'cruz and Jasmine Pereira Abstract — The water quality near to a coral reef site in Jebel Ali, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE) was studied. Many Physico-Chemical parameters for water samples taken at two different depths (0.5 m and 1.0 m) parallel to a...
    2,748 Words | 11 Pages
  • Great Barrier Reef - 893 Words
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  • Marine Ecology - Port Noarlunga Reef: Should it remain a reserve?
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