Cognitive behavioral therapy Essays & Research Papers

Best Cognitive behavioral therapy Essays

  • Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy . - 483 Words
    Marissa Boltz Kate Pickett Abnormal Psychology 280 April 17th, 2013 CBT CBT also known as cognitive-behavioral therapy “…helps individuals make changes not only in their overt behavior but also in their underlying thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes” (Nevid, 113). CBT helps you become aware of inaccurate or negative thinking, so you can view challenging situations more clearly and respond to them in a more effective way. It can be very useful to most people who are suffering from a mental...
    483 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy - 1126 Words
     Cognitive behavioral therapy’s reduction of stress and improvements in sleeping habits Stress affects every person in two different dimensions; it is either positive or negative. When stress leads a person to positive outcomes, it can be looked at as beneficial because it could possibly enhance confidence, performance and lead to outstanding end results. But if stress has a negative effect on a person’s life it can lead to physical and psychological...
    1,126 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - 3387 Words
    Ellis (1993) writes of how there is an inner conflict in all people. Humans have an ability to create, develop, and actualize themselves as healthy goal-attaining people. However, this being said they also have an ability to structure irrational thinking, inappropriate emotions and dysfunctional behaviours (Nelson-Jones 1995). Each person on this earth has their own internal storage device for gathering thoughts, ideas, beliefs, memories, the list goes on. A persons mind can affect them in so...
    3,387 Words | 10 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - 2640 Words
     Theories of Counseling: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Jennifer Z Lewis Liberty University Abstract Cognitive behavioral therapy is a form of treatment that helps clients detect and change dysfunctional and false thought and behavioral patterns through restructuring of their thought process. Cognitive behavioral therapy has shown to be effective with many areas of mental distress including depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and substance abuse. Cognitive behavioral therapy...
    2,640 Words | 8 Pages
  • All Cognitive behavioral therapy Essays

  • cognitive behavioral therapy - 488 Words
    Analyze and Assist – Grace Kennedy My person of choice is a girl by the name of Jodie. Jodie is 8 years old and is normally very attentive, social, and hardworking. The past 4 months her mother has been concerned that she is unhappy. She is not learning well in school and her school work has been deteriorating. She’s also been observed to be quieter at school, although usually settles as the school day progresses. Her parents separated roughly 4 months ago and contact with her father is...
    488 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - 551 Words
    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a psychotherapeutic approach that addresses dysfunctional emotions, maladaptive behaviors and cognitive processes and contents through a number of goal-oriented, explicit systematic procedures. The name refers to behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, and to therapy based upon a combination of basic behavioral and cognitive principles and research. Most therapists working with patients dealing with anxiety and depression use...
    551 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - 1753 Words
    Theory Critique on: Cognitive Behavioral and Reality Therapy Liberty College Debra Borzym Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Aaron Beck is known as the pioneer of cognitive therapy, which has been a utilized approach to psychotherapy. Beck attempted to further Freud’s theory of depression; however, the research moved more towards errors in logic, coined “cognitive distortions” which were deemed the basis of underlying dysfunction and depression. The fundamental aspect of cognitive...
    1,753 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - 2686 Words
    Introduction: In order to overcome behavioral problems such as anxiety, depression or fear, individuals usually communicate their problems or anxieties with their trusted friends or family members. In case of a somewhat complicated problem, a counselor is consulted. These are a relatively simple form of psychotherapies that individuals have been practicing from centuries. However, with the development of modern science and advancements in the field of psychology, theorists have identified some...
    2,686 Words | 8 Pages
  • Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
    Adrian Quintero Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Anxiety in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial Doesn’t the name of this article just make you want to figure out what it’s going to be about? It did for me and after seeing the name of this study I found myself more than interested. Going into this paper I had no idea of what to write about. When I seen the title of this study, I immediately wanted to find out more about what cognitive-behavioral...
    1,039 Words | 3 Pages
  • Etiology of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (Cbt)
    Cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) of depression is a psychotherapeutic treatment approach that involves the application of specific, empirically supported strategies focused on changing negative thinking patterns and altering behavior. In order to alleviate the symptoms of depression, treatment is directed at the following three domains: cognition, behavioral and physiological. In the cognitive domain, patients learn to apply cognitive restructuring techniques so that negatively distorted...
    7,913 Words | 22 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Traumatic Event
    Latonia December 15, 2012 Psy-101 Professor M Post -Traumatic Stress Disorder When hearing about Post-traumatic stress disorder, majority of people think about war veterans. Many Americans suffer from Post -traumatic stress disorder. However some are not aware that they have it. Post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD is rarely acknowledged or fully understood. Post-traumatic stress disorder is an anxiety disorder that some people get after seeing or living through a dangerous...
    1,619 Words | 5 Pages
  • An Essay On The Effectiveness Of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
    Home Assignment 2: Summary of the Empirical Article The primary goal of the authors of this article was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy as a treatment for three eating disorders—purging and nonpurging bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. These three eating disorders all have something in common, as they are all classified as mental disorders. Because these disorders share some common ground, the researchers wanted to look at where they differed—in this case,...
    668 Words | 2 Pages
  • Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
    Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: A Journal Article Beatrice St.Surin Liberty University COUN-506 September 23, 2012 Abstract According to the article Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, published in the Journal of Psychology and Christianity in 2007, Siang-Yang Tan talked about how prayer and scripture can be incorporated into the practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Lately, in the field of CBT, there have been an...
    1,713 Words | 5 Pages
  • A Personal Theory of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Counseling
    Running head: A PERSONAL THEORY OF COGNITIVE- 1 A Personal Theory of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Counseling Mary L. Terry Student ID #: 22185762 Liberty University Abstract A counselor’s job is to journey along with their client and to provide insight and support to those who are at risk and those who are hurting and searching for comfort and acceptance. If the counselor is a Christian they will also want to share our Heavenly Father’s love with the counselee and help guide them...
    2,704 Words | 8 Pages
  • cognitive therapy - 451 Words
    2. One of your best friends feels that he fails at everything he does and that his life isn't worth living. When you suggest that he talk to a psychotherapist, your friend responds, “Talking won't help. The more I talk about myself, the more I think about my problems. The more I think about my problems, the more depressed I get.” Explain why your friend's comment illustrates his need for cognitive therapy. What procedures would a cognitive therapist use to help your friend overcome his negative...
    451 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and the Model of Human Occupation.
    Running head: COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY AND THE MODEL Abstract Human behavior can be explained by a variety of biological, psychosocial, and environmental factors interacting on a person over time. The values, beliefs, and goals that determine the behaviors one engages in are developed through cognitive processes unique to each individual as a result of the interplay between previous learning and the aforementioned factors. When considered together, the Model of Human Occupation and...
    3,606 Words | 13 Pages
  • Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
    Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Article Review Venus Etsitty: 22765509 7/1/2012 COUN 506: D12 Liberty University Summary In the article titled “Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy”, a discussion arises about the incorporation of scripture and prayer into the practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Cognitive-behavioral therapy is widely supported by empirical evidence for treatment in a wide variety of psychological disorders...
    1,124 Words | 4 Pages
  • Adlerian, Cognitive Behavioral, and Solution Focused Brief Therapy
    Adlerian, Cognitive Behavioral, and Solution Focused Brief Therapy are three major theories that are used today. All three theories have things that make them similar as well as different. Adlerian Theory, founded by Alfred Adler, is stated as a social psychology. The theory is relatively simple, and it puts the responsibility for behavior and success solely on the person. (Seligman & Reichenberg) Adlerian pays considerable attention to social context, family dynamics, and child rearing....
    2,155 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy CBT Vs M
    Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Motivational Interviewing Leigh Lusignan Walden University CPSY 6728-4 Substance Abuse Counseling Facilitator: Dr. Natalie Spencer July 23, 2014 Week 8 Discussion 1 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) vs Motivational Interviewing (MI) Today, I will introduce the comparison between Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Motivational Interviewing (MI). The similarities and differences will be addressed regarding techniques and/or methods. In addition, I will...
    1,091 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression and Anxiety Attacks
    As it is characteristic of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Donald Meichenbaum’s treatment of the client, Anna, was a short-term therapy, only lasting about 20 sessions. His eclectic style of work was elicited by Anna because she was horribly depressed and had currently experienced bouts of panic attacks that were making her life miserable, and affecting the lives of those around her. Meichenbaum took a CBT approach with Anna within the first few sessions in order to help rid her of her...
    817 Words | 2 Pages
  • Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
     Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Liberty University Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive Behavior-Therapy Summary Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavior Therapy can be found in the Journal of Psychology and Christianity. The author, Stan Yang-Tan, covers the apposite use of applying prayer and scripture to the 30-year-old process of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) (p.101). With an array of...
    1,001 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Inner Healing Prayer
    J ournal of Psychology and Christianity Copyright 2007 Christian Association for Psychological Studies 2007, Vol. 26, No. 2, 101-111 ISSN 0733-4273 Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Siang-Yang Tan Graduate School ofPsychology Fuller Theological Seminary This article covers the appropriate and ethical use of prayer including inner healing prayer, and Scripture in a Christian approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), Expanded CBT now includes...
    8,340 Words | 32 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Computer Assisted Therapy/Cyber Counseling
    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Computer Assisted Therapy/Cyber Counseling Ivy Tech Community College 2013 Cognitive behaviorist therapy would be useful in substance abuse counseling because it is effective in treating Anxiety, Depression, Phobias, Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder, Panic Disorders, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Research has showed that it is very useful when treating Anxiety and Depression. There are some disadvantages to this...
    1,305 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive, Cognitive Behavioral, and Reality Theory
    Cognitive, Cognitive Behavioral and Reality Theory � PAGE * MERGEFORMAT �1� Cognitive, Cognitive Behavioral, and Reality Theory PCN 500 Cognitive, Cognitive Behavioral, and Reality Theory Overview There are many definitions of counseling, but most share the same idea: it is when one person helps another. To me counseling represents one word more than any other: Change. One person is unhappy with some area of their life and wants it to change while the other person helps to facilitate that...
    936 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Approach - 579 Words
    Cognitive Behavioral Approach In the 1950s, the prevailing tradition in psychology was that of the Behaviorist perspective. It focused on outward human and animal behavior as opposed to internal mental states like consciousness and thought. Though these constructs are not observable, they could not be ignored. The notion that these internal states do result in outward behavior set the stage for the cognitive revolution. Application of a dual (cognitive and behavioral) approach to explaining...
    579 Words | 2 Pages
  • Behavioral Cognitive Case Study
    Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Schizophrenia: A Case Study William Bradshaw University of Minnesota Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Journal, 12, (1) 13-25, 1998 Abstract Cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) has rarely been applied as the primary treatment for the multiple, severe and persistent problems that characterize schizophrenia. This case study describes the process of CBT in the long-term outpatient care of a young woman with schizophrenia. The study...
    5,709 Words | 17 Pages
  • Counseling: Cognitive-behavioral Therapists
    Evidence based practice of counseling and psychotherapy paper Coun 501 Counselor Professional Identity, Function, and Ethics Jacqueline Moore March 10, 2013 Liberty University Author Note This assignment is being submitted on March 10, 2013 for Dr. Gavin for Coun 501 Counselor Professional Identity, Function, and Ethics Abstract Despite the general acknowledgement that it is important for counseling and psychotherapy practice to be informed by research, it is clear that in recent...
    1,639 Words | 5 Pages
  • Behavioral therapy outline - 1623 Words
    PCN-500 Theory Outline Erica Boltz I. Theory: Behavioral Therapy a. Key Concepts i. This approach operates by the following principles 1. Behaviors are strengthened or weakened by its consequences 2. Behaviors that get rewarded will increase and the ones that get punished will decrease 3. This is a functional approach, rather than structural 4. Positive and negative environments can have a positive or negative affect on client 5. Behaviorism is ant mentalist 6. Behavior therapy is...
    1,623 Words | 8 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Theory - 1336 Words
    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a short-term, problem-centered therapy that is used to address psychopathology within the individual (Beck, 1995). This model of therapy is used to address issues of depression, anxiety, eating disorders, relational problems, and drug abuse, and can be utilized when working with individuals, as well as within group and family modalities. The core aspects of this therapy include collaboration and participation by the client, a strong alliance between...
    1,336 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive-Behavioral Approach - 1031 Words
    Cognitive-Behavioral Approach Introduction Our thought process plays a very important role in how we feel generally and in what we do. There is a type of psychotherapy that places emphasis on this role that our thought process plays in these situations and it is called cognitive behavioral therapy. This theory focus on the idea that all our attitudes, feelings and behaviors are caused by our thoughts, and not by external factors such as events, people and situations that we encounter....
    1,031 Words | 3 Pages
  • Treating Childhood Depression from a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Approach
    Treating Childhood Depression from a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Approach Depression in Children: Cognitive Behavioral Approach Patricia Kilgore University of Phoenix Depression in Children and a Cognitive Behavioral Approach Depression in children stem from a variety of factors relating to health, history, life events, genetic vulnerabilities, family history, and biochemical imbalances. Every individual...
    1,177 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Intervention Approach
    Cognitive Behavioral Intervention Approach Designed for students diagnosed with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) there are a numerous amount of intervention strategies and methods that can be used to implement and help students build their self-management skills. These intervention strategies are used with the intention of students ultimately learning how to control their behaviors in and out of school. Consequently, self-sufficient intervention approaches are a supported and...
    1,329 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavior Therapy - 507 Words
    The therapy that I would like to discuss is Cognitive Behavior Therapy with it's many dynamics, and conceptual views. The reason I chose this therapy is the realistic understanding of directing individuals in seeking the best possible life given the powers and circumstances that exist. Many clinical problems are best described as disorders of thought and feeling, and since behavior is effectively controlled by the way we think the most logical and effective way of trying to...
    507 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cognitive Therapy for Depression - 2465 Words
    Abstract The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader of the theory of Cognitive Therapy for Depression. In doing so, I will discuss the evidence that supports the use of cognitive therapy for depression, the advantages and the disadvantages. The usage of cognitive therapy with children for depression and ending with the assumptions associated with the theory. Cognitive Therapy for Depression Cognitive Therapy (CT) is a form of psychotherapy that was...
    2,465 Words | 8 Pages
  • Cognitive Therapy vs Medication
    Walters 1 Kensi Walters Paulsen English 100 July 20, 2014 Cognitive Therapy Depression is one of the most commonly diagnosed mental disorders in the United States. There are two types of depression, chemical and environmental. Chemical depression is when either the brain does not produce serotonin or the serotonin receptors in the brain do not work. A chemical imbalance can be fixed with the right medication and frequent visits with a psychiatrist. Environmental depression is very...
    1,019 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cognitive Processing Therapy - 3390 Words
     Cognitive Processing Therapy for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Capella University Abstract The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effectiveness of Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) in treating rape victims suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a mental disorder that affects individuals emotionally, behaviorally, and psychologically. PTSD estimated to affect about 7% of Americans in a lifetime. The content of this paper...
    3,390 Words | 10 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Theory - 594 Words
    Applying Cognitive Behavioral Theory In Chemical Dependency Chemical dependency is an everyday occurrence that affects all economic and social classes throughout the world. In this paper I will explore Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and how it is used in working with chemical dependency or addiction patients’ in the counseling setting. In addition, when working with chemically dependent clients, not all treatments work for any particular client and some clients do not respond to any...
    594 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive Therapy and the Elderly - 2792 Words
    Problem Statement: Magnitude of Problem: Aging is an occurrence we are all familiar with, a trait characteristic of all mankind. According to the U.S. Census Bureau's, the elderly population will more than double between now and the year 2050. By 2050, as many as 1 in 5 Americans will be elderly; and as the United States elderly population increases, so does the need for diverse health care (National Institute of Health, 2003). Moreover, it is estimated that 18 to 25 percent of elder adult...
    2,792 Words | 9 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Ptsd
    itive Behavioural Final Paper Cognitive Behavioural and related Therapies for the Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Abstract In this paper the therapies related to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) will be studied in order to determine the applicability thereof for the treatment (and prevention) of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). PTSD will be summarised as described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental disorders edition 4 with revisions...
    9,226 Words | 28 Pages
  • An Introduction to Cognitive Therapy - 1570 Words
    4/22/12 Cognitive Therapy & CBT Home » Therapy » Types of Counselling and Psychotherapy » An Introduction to Cognitive Therapy & Cognitive Behavioural Approaches By Dr Greg Mulhauser, Managing Editor Cognitive therapy (or cognitive behavioural therapy) helps the client to uncover and alter distortions of thought or perceptions which may be causing or prolonging psychological distress. Underlying Theory of Cognitive Therapy The central insight of cognitive therapy as originally...
    1,570 Words | 5 Pages
  • Abstract for Cognitive Behavior Therapy
    Abstract for cognitive behavior therapyAbstract Cognitive behavioral group therapy is based on behavioral practitioners using a brief, active, directive. Collaborative, present-focused, didactic, psychoeducational model of therapy that relies on empirical validation of its concepts, and techniques (Reinecke & Freeman, 2003). Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) had replaced the term behavioral therapy. The cognitive behavioral approach to groups currently represents the...
    345 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy - 889 Words
    COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY Cognitive behavioral therapy (or cognitive behavioral therapies or CBT) is a psychotherapeutic approach that aims to solve problems concerning dysfunctional emotions, behaviors and cognitions through a goal-oriented, systematic procedure.[i] The title is used in diverse ways to designate behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, and to refer to therapy based upon a combination of basic behavioral and cognitive research. There is empirical evidence that CBT is...
    889 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cognitive Behaviour Therapy - 2761 Words
     Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Depression in Older Adults Depression can be described as a mood state that affects a person’s behaviour, thought process and overall well- being. It often results in feelings of emptiness, hopelessness, worrying, guilt, helplessness, irritability, sadness and overall day to day distress. A person with depression will often experience changes in their appetite resulting in eating less than normal or more than normal,...
    2,761 Words | 9 Pages
  • Cognitive Behaviour Therapy - 712 Words
    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a psychotherapeutic approach that addresses dysfunctional emotions, behaviours, and cognitions through a goal-oriented, systematic process. The name refers to behaviour therapy, cognitive therapy, and to therapy based upon a combination of basic behavioural and cognitive research. CBT was primarily developed through an integration of behaviour therapy (first popularized by Edward Thorndike) with cognitive therapy (developed by Aaron Beckand and Albert...
    712 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT)
    Assumptions and Definition Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) addresses dysfunctional emotions, maladaptive behaviors, and cognitive processes. This is an effective treatment for patients who are dealing with anxiety and depression. CBT refers to a group of psychotherapies that incorporate techniques from cognitive therapy and behavior therapy. Albert Ellis and Aaron Beck are the two psychologists who came up with therapies. Beck developed the cognitive therapy (CT) that focuses on changing...
    1,566 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavior Therapy - 357 Words
    Cognitive Behavior Therapy What is cognitive behavior therapy (CBT)? CBT works by changing people’s attitudes and their behavior. It focuses on the thoughts, images, beliefs and attitudes that we hold (our cognitive processes) and how this relates to the way we behave and deal with our emotional problems. Research has shown that cognitive behavioral therapy is effective in treating anxiety disorders as well as panic disorders and social phobias. The cognitive component helps change the...
    357 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. - 356 Words
    Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy CBT’s primary objective is to improve functioning and emotional well-being by identifying the beliefs, feelings, and behaviour associated with an individual’s complex traumatic history. These beliefs, feelings, and behaviours are revised during the course of therapy to meet the client’s desired outcome and positive life goals. Emphasis is on identifying and reducing symptoms, developing a strong therapist-client relationship,...
    356 Words | 2 Pages
  • understanding the principles of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
    Understanding the Principles and Practices of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy This essay intends to examine some of the principles and practices of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy an approach to therapy that has become a staple of modern day therapy and reflective professional practice based on ‘actively constructing a collection, selection and interpretation of data’ (Finlay and Gough, 2003, p.5). This examination will begin with a critical evaluation of the key principles and practices that...
    2,836 Words | 10 Pages
  • APA Eassay Cognitive Behavior Therapy
     Cognitive Behavior Therapy: A Counseling Approach Erika Moton I.D 2085356 Developing a Psych Perspective 3002 Topic Analysis Assessment Capella University October 2014 Abstract This paper will discuss the theorists of cognitive behavior therapy beliefs and assumptions about helping and will describe the theorist’s helping style. It will further examine the theory’s key components: philosophy of a healthy personality, the nature and sources of dysfunction, and goals of the helping...
    1,550 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Internet Addicts
    Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Internet Addicts Certified Doctor of Psychology, Kimberly S. Young, in her article, “Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Internet Addicts: Treatments Outcomes and Implications” analyzes how efficient Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) , which had been shown to be an effective treatment for compulsive disorder, works towards clients in order to treat those suffering from internet addictions. Young’s purpose is to inform the public of the major factors that are...
    861 Words | 3 Pages
  • Compare and Contrast the Main Principles in Any Two of the Followingpsychological Therapies: Psychoanalysis, Behavior Therapy, Cognitive Therapy or Humanistic Therapy
    Psychology Assignment 1 “Compare and contrast the main principles in any two of the followingPsychological therapies: psychoanalysis, behavior therapy, cognitive therapy or humanistic therapy.” Over the detritus of centuries, mental illnesses (such as anxiety, depression and personality disorder) have been a major contentious topic, especially in the medieval times in which religion centered, cultural and traditional influenced people deemed these exhibiting symptoms of psychopathology...
    1,584 Words | 5 Pages
  • Individual Treatment in Group Process Practice Psychoeducational Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Divorced Women Experiencing Anxiety and Depression
    Individual Treatment in Group Process Practice Psychoeducational Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Divorced Women Experiencing Anxiety and Depression Amy Danowski CNSL/561 August 20, 2012 Donna Clark Assessment: Clinical interview Diagnosis: Axis I 300.02 Generalized Anxiety Disorder 296.23 Major Depressive Disorder, Single Episode, Severe without Psychotic Features Axis II V71.09 No diagnosis Axis III None Axis IV Problems with primary support...
    2,574 Words | 9 Pages
  • Trauma- Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: an Effective Treatment Modality for Children and Adolescents Who Have Experienced Traumatic Incidents
    Trauma- Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: An Effective treatment modality for children and Adolescents who have experienced traumatic incidents * What is TF-CBT and What is it Best Suited for: Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) was developed by psychologists J.A. Cohen and, Mannarino, Knudset and Sharon. TF-CBT has been developed for those who have experienced psychological trauma, often on a great scale of magnitude. It is important to define trauma; “There...
    1,698 Words | 5 Pages
  • A Site Visit to Better Understand Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention
    Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions: A Site Visit Report Julio F Caceres BSHS 312 December 19, 2011 Cherlie Saffeels Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions: A Site Visit Report Famed American psychologist, Abraham Maslow, once said, “We may define therapy as a search for value.” That value that the client is seeking is in one’s self. Self value is very important. Human beings are creatures that require self validation; why do they exist? Why do they continue to live? Why do they...
    2,030 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Described as a Sticking Plaster
    Cognitive Behavioural Therapy has been described as a ‘sticking plaster' for the problems that people may bring to counselling (Observer, 19/02/06). With reference to the literature, critically evaluate the arguments for and against this view. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a combination of two kinds of therapy; cognitive therapy and behavioural therapy (Bush, 2005). It has been shown to have a positive impact on a wide range of mood and anxiety disorders, such as depression,...
    2,207 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
    Cognitive behavioural therapy is a combination of behavioural strategies and cognitive therapy (Zayfert, 2006). Aaron T. Beck was the founder of cognitive behavioural therapy in 1963, initially his work focused on depression. The basic principles of cognitive behavioural therapy are people’s thoughts, emotions and behaviours and all work together in a unified system (Curwen.B, 2000). B. Curwen states: “That thoughts can lead to emotions and behaviour; and that emotional disorders arise...
    1,232 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Theory Based Evaluation of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
    ASSIGNMENT: ‘A theory based evaluation of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy’ The purpose of this essay is to provide a theory based evaluation of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). The first part of this essay will concentrate on defining CBT including a brief description of its derived history and the therapies that have contributed to its development. I will then move on to review the tools used in the four step process of CBT (assessment, formulation, intervention and evaluation). I...
    2,787 Words | 9 Pages
  • Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavior Therapy
    Review of Journal Article “Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavior Therapy” Review of Journal Article “Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavior Therapy” Summary This article talks about Cognitive-Behavior therapy and using prayer and scripture appropriately, how to approach using biblical/ Christian values in therapy. The journal also talks about an historical overview of behavioral therapy, throughout the years. The commentary discusses the two component of...
    641 Words | 2 Pages
  • Use of Prayer and Scripture in Coginitiv- Behavioral Therapy
    Use of Prayer and Scripture in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Integration of Psychology and Theology Tamala Rivers February 16, 2012 Summary This article focuses on the use of prayer and scripture in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). First you must focus on the biblical approach which you acknowledge Gods love and deal with past hurts in a proper manner. You also must focus on Gods Holy Spirit and his scriptures. As the therapist you should not be in self, you have to focus on your...
    1,257 Words | 4 Pages
  • Critical Analysis of Three Psychotherapy Approaches: Client-Centered Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, and Psychodynamic Therapy
    Critical Analysis of Three Psychotherapy Approaches: Client-Centered Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, and Psychodynamic Therapy Midterm SWG 598 Bridge I Introduction As social workers, it is our responsibility to use the most effective method of practice to engage our clients, assess their situation, and help them create goals that will produce positive outcomes. Every client will present a unique set of challenges; therefore, the social worker must be careful in choosing an approach that...
    1,812 Words | 6 Pages
  • Compare And Contrast The Psychodynamic Cognitive Behavioral And Person Centered Approaches To Counseling
     I find the approaches of psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and person centered approaches to counseling fascinating. There are many different aspects to all three approaches that fit my personality. I do not believe that I would be able to pick one single approach and stick to it. I do however feel that if you have a client that would benefit from one single approach then that would be the responsible thing to do for the client. However, I am not sure if a persons (professional) human...
    1,425 Words | 4 Pages
  • A Comparison of the Emotion-Focused and Cognitive Behavioral Theories of Anger and Its Treatment.
    Abstract Anger is often a difficult emotion to express and understand and it has come to be recognized as a significant social problem that our society facing today. This paper discusses the efficacy of the Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and the Emotion-focused therapy (EFT) for treating patient with anger problems and compared therapists’ view on emotion which how they see emotion as the prime mover in human experience in different ways respectively. Besides, the development, overview...
    3,229 Words | 10 Pages
  • A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Fluoxetine (Prozac) in the Treatment of Depression
    BEHAVIORTHERAPY28, 187-210, 1997 A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Fluoxetine (Prozac) in the Treatment of Depression DAVID O. ANTONUCCIO University of Nevada School of Medicine and Reno V.A. Medical Center (116B2) MICHAEL THOMAS University of Nevada Dept. of Accounting and CIS WILLIAM G. DANTON University of Nevada School of Medicine and Reno EA. Medical Center/(116B2) Depression affects at least 11 million Americans per year and costs the U.S....
    9,936 Words | 34 Pages
  • Three Principles/Techniques of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Which Are Thought to Help It Be an Effective Therapy.
    This essay will consist of a brief description of three principles or techniques of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy which help it be an effective therapy. It will also describe the cognitive perspective on client problems. Based off of a philosophical background the cognitive behavioural model was formed and can be defined as “A broad set of approaches to improving adaptive and emotional functioning based on theories of learning and behaviour change.” (Westbrook, Kennerley & Kirk 2008)....
    1,008 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Internet Addicts: Treatment Outcomes and Implications
     The article that I took most interest in was Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Internet Addicts: Treatment Outcomes and Implications. This specific article informs us about the growing clinical disorder known as “internet addiction” such as: its causes, symptoms, and treatment options. The disorder is associated with social, academic, familial, and occupational impairment. Over the years, Internet addiction has grown tremendously and is commonly caused by an underlying emotional issue and seen...
    686 Words | 2 Pages
  • CBT Therapy - 771 Words
    Brief history of the theory and theorist. In it's simplest form, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, (or CBT as it will be referred to from here on out), refers to the approach of changing dysfunctional behaviors and thoughts to realistic and healthy ones. CBT encompasses several types of therapy focusing on the impact of an individual's thinking as it relates to expressed behaviors. Such models include rational emotive therapy (RET), rational emotive behavioral therapy (REBT), behavior therapy...
    771 Words | 3 Pages
  • cognitive theory - 1513 Words
    Introduction: I would like to present my paper on Cognitive theory and use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Bipolar Disorder. The project will show efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral therapy in treating Depression. Cognitive theory was originated by Aaron Temkin Beck (b.1921) .A.T. Beck`s Pioneering research established efficacy of cognitive therapy for depression. He has successfully applied cognitive therapy to depression, generalised anxiety and panic disorders, marital and relationship...
    1,513 Words | 5 Pages
  • Types of therapy - 3731 Words
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