Chromosome Essays & Research Papers

Best Chromosome Essays

  • Chromosome - 382 Words
    Chromosome 13 Chromosomes are organized structures of DNA and protein found in a cell. There are normally 46 chromosomes in a human cell- 23 pairs. You should get 23 from your mother’s egg & another 23 from your father’s sperm. Sometimes these chromosomes can encounter a problem. The two main problems being deletion of a chromosome or an extra chromosome. Chromosome 13 is a chromosome that everyone has a pair of. It normally takes up about 3.5-4% of the total DNA in cells. There...
    382 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chromosomes - 362 Words
    Unit 34 assignment 2 Towards P3, P4, M2 and D1 Chromosomes A chromosome is a visible state of genetic material during a phase of the division of the cell. Humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes which helps to make the diploid number of 46 a diploid number means the normal of chromosomes in a normal cell. The haploid number is normally half of what the diploid number is. The haploid is the number of chromosomes of a normal cell. Chromosomes structure A chromosome is a rod-shaped...
    362 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chromosomes - 895 Words
    I. Karyotype Analysis of Human Chromosomes 1. Karyotype preparation and analysis Cells (from blood, amniotic fluid, etc) are grown in vitro (in a cell culture dish) to increase their number Cell division is then arrested in metaphase with colchicine (prevents mitotic spindle from forming) Cells are centrifuged and lysed to release chromosomes Chromosomes are stained, photographed, and grouped by size and banding patterns This is a photograph of the 46 human chromosomes in a somatic cell,...
    895 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chromosome and Question - 2299 Words
    Write your name here Surname Other names Edexcel International GCSE Centre Number Candidate Number Biology Unit: 4BI0 Science (Double Award) 4SC0 Paper: 1B Monday 9 January 2012 – Morning Time: 2 hours You must have: Ruler Calculator Paper Reference 4BI0/1B 4SC0/1B Total Marks Instructions Use black ink or ball-point pen. Fill in the boxes at the top of this page with your name, centre number and candidate number. Answer all questions. Answer the questions in the spaces...
    2,299 Words | 34 Pages
  • All Chromosome Essays

  • Sex Chromosomes - 3096 Words
    Sex Chromosomes Introduction Few people every wonder or care about their gender and why they are male or female.. Sex-determination system is a complex but fascinating progress, especially within reptiles, birds and insects. All living organisms begin with one eukaryotic cell; inside the nucleus of each cell contain thread-like structures called chromosomes. Chromosomes are once theorized to be derived from autosomes (chromosomes that are not sex chromosomes) and have changed into...
    3,096 Words | 8 Pages
  • Chromosome Mapping - 1296 Words
    Chromosome Mapping Diana Mackenzie 5/29/2014 Abstract: Chromosome mapping is a key tool in modern biology from deciding which chromosomes contain which diseases to which ancestor the diseases may have come from. This leaves the question of how mapping works and the importance of it. The mapping allows for a much closer look into chromosomes and how they function. Since each human has 50,000 genes expressed knowing where to find them and how they operate becomes much more important in...
    1,296 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chromosome Mutations - 400 Words
    Chromosomes Mutations­ With the exception of the mother’s egg cells or the father’s sperm cells, every cell in the normal human body contains 23 pairs of chromosomes, totaling 46 in each cell called the diploid number. According to The Human Genome project there are over 30,000 genes in every cell, spread unevenly across the chromosomes. Of the 23 pairs of chromosomes, one member is inherited from the mother, and one from the father. Members of each pair are called homologous. The first 22...
    400 Words | 2 Pages
  • Meiosis: Chromosomes - 2632 Words
    Meiosis BIOL 1111 Introduction Meiosis is the second important kind of nuclear division. It resembles mitosis in many ways but the consequences of meiotic divisions are very different from those of mitotic divisions. While mitotic division may occur in almost any living cell of an organism, meiosis occurs only in special cells. In animals, meiosis is restricted to cells that form gametes (eggs and sperm). Each species has a characteristic number of chromosomes per somatic cell. Fruit...
    2,632 Words | 9 Pages
  • X Chromosome and Intelligence - 1260 Words
    "Science is not about building a body of known 'facts'. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good," reveals the English author, Terry Pratchett. Two articles explore whether or not intelligence is linked to the X chromosome in a person's genetic makeup. Perhaps this research will end the never ending battle of the sexes regarding which sex is smarter. X Rated summary Recent...
    1,260 Words | 5 Pages
  • Salivary Gland Chromosome Preparation
    Experiment 1 Salivary Gland Chromosome Preparation Introduction: Microscopic, threadlike part of the cell and a structured DNA which carries hereditary information in the form of genes is a chromosome. Endomitosis is mitosis without nuclear or cellular division. This produces many copies of the same chromosome in a single nucleus (Kim 2004). For this experiment, I hypothesize that D. melanogaster undergoes endomitosis meaning without cellular mitotic division. If it undergoes endomitosis,...
    353 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chromosome 6 Review - 625 Words
    sis: (From book cover) When notorious underworld leader Carlo Franconi is gunned down, his Mafioso competitors become prime suspects. Suspicions are fuelled when Franconi’s body disappears from the city morgue before it can be autopsied- much to the embarrassment of the authorities, but to the amusement of forensic pathologist Jack Stapleton. A few days later, the mutilated, unidentifiable body of a ‘floater’ arrives on the autopsy table and Jack himself becomes disturbed by the case. While...
    625 Words | 2 Pages
  • Meiosis and Homologous Chromosomes - 750 Words
    Meiosis Review Worksheet Pledge: _____1. If the sperm cell of a fruit fly has 4 chromosomes, then the number of chromosomes in each body cell is: a. 2 b. 4 c. 6 d. 8 e. 16 _____2. Of the following cells, the only one to have the haploid number of chromosomes is: a) skin b)muscle c) nerve d) connective e) ovum _____3. The diploid number is restored as a result of: a)...
    750 Words | 5 Pages
  • Karyotype: Sex Chromosomes - 1225 Words
    PRACTICAL 1: HUMAN KARYOTYPING LAB INTRODUCTION The complete set of chromosomes in the body cell of a species is known as karyotype. Karyotype is a test to identify and evaluate the size, shape, and number of chromosomes in a sample of body cells. Any abnormalities such as extra, missing, or abnormal positions of chromosome pieces can cause problems with a person growth, development and body functions. Karyotype can be used to determine whether the chromosomes of an adult have an...
    1,225 Words | 4 Pages
  • Questions and Answers on DNA and Chromosomes
    CHAPTER 13 OBJECTIVES The Basis of Heredity 1. Explain in general terms how traits are transmitted from parents to offspring. An organism's traits and appearance are controlled by specific forms of proteins contained in DNA. When gametes are formed, the male and female parents pass along their DNA into their respective gametes. Fertilization fuses the gametes and combines the genetic contribution of each parent into the new offspring. 2. Distinguish between asexual and sexual...
    766 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Positioning of Chromosomes During Cell Division
    Introduction For a zygote to contain a diploid complement of chromosomes, the gametes, which fuse to form this zygote must contain half the number of chromosomes. This reduction of chromosome number occurs in two distinct sequential phases of meiosis, termed meiosis I and meiosis II. Both divisional sequences have sub-stages such as, prophase (I, II), prometaphase (I, II), metaphase (I, II), anaphase (I, II), and telophase (I, II) that is continued by cytokinesis (I, II), which is not part of...
    889 Words | 3 Pages
  • Meiosis: Mitosis and Homologous Chromosomes Exchange
    Meiosis Modeling Activity Background Information Meiosis is the process by which eukaryotic organisms produce egg and sperm having half the genetic information (haploid) of the other cells in the organism’s body (diploid). You will notice some similarities to mitosis but some definite differences in meiosis that result in genetic diversity in the gametes as well as the offspring formed by the eventual fusion of the egg and sperm. Two of the most noted differences in meiosis are that 1)...
    844 Words | 4 Pages
  • Polytene Chromosomes of an Indian Himalayan Black Fly Simulium (Nevermannia) Praelargum (Diptera: Simuliidae)
    W. HENRY et al.: Polytene Chromosomes of S. (Nevermannia) praelargum UNCORRECTED PROOF Polytene Chromosomes of an Indian Himalayan black fly Simulium (Nevermannia) praelargum (Diptera: Simuliidae) Willie HENRY1, Subrata Kumar DEY2, Rakesh VARMA1, Sachin THAPA1, William S PROCUNIER3 1 2 P.G. Department of Zoology, Darjeeling Government College, Darjeeling, West Bengal 734101, India School of Biotechnology, West Bengal University of Technology,BF-142, Sector 1,Salt Lake City, Kolkata...
    3,599 Words | 12 Pages
  • Using P-Element Induced Male Recombination to Generate a Deletion in the Dmap1 Gene on Chromosome Two in Drosophila Melanogaster
    Using P-element Induced Male Recombination to Generate a Deletion in the DMAP1 Gene on Chromosome Two in Drosophila melanogaster Abstract: The goal of this study was to induce a deletion in the DMAP1 gene on chromosome two in Drosophila melanogaster through P-element mobilization. The DMAP1 gene may be an essential gene, however not much is known about it. We attempted to uncover the function of DMAP1 by creating a series of genetic crosses and selecting for brown-eyed non-stubble male...
    5,943 Words | 19 Pages
  • Biol 2104 Lab Report 1
    Introduction A chromosome is a minuscule threadlike part of the nucleus and a structured DNA in the form of genes carrying hereditary information (Bridges, 1938). Endomitosis is the process of mitosis of chromosomes without undergoing nuclear or cellular division to increase cell volume. This results in a single nucleus having many copies of a single chromosome (Painter & Reindorp, 1940). In this experiment, Drosophila melanogaster is reared in specific conditions and its salivary gland...
    521 Words | 2 Pages
  • Unit 2 Inheritance In Life Lecture 9 13
    So in the last unit we studied about chemical basis of life. Now just Focus for a moment on biology‘s subject, ‗life‘. All living things on earth are characterized by cellular organization, growth, reproduction, homeostasis and heredity. These characteristics define the term life. Then what is inheritance? Inheritance is something you possess from your ancestor and carried along, it may be any asset, money or anything but when we connect with the life what we will take from our parental...
    5,637 Words | 22 Pages
  • what is sex - 965 Words
    Organisms of many species are specialized into male and female varieties, each known as a sex.[1] Sexual reproduction involves the combining and mixing of genetic traits: specialized cells known as gametes combine to form offspring that inherit traits from each parent. Gametes can be identical in form and function (known as isogamy), but in many cases an asymmetry has evolved such that two sex-specific types of gametes (heterogametes) exist (known as anisogamy). By definition, male gametes are...
    965 Words | 3 Pages
  • Genetics of Parenthood - 1358 Words
    The Genetics of Parenthood Abstract: Why do people, even closely related people, look slightly different from each other? The reason for these differences in physical characteristics, or appearance, (called phenotype) is the different combination of genes (the genotype) possessed by each individual. All of your genes are segments of DNA located on your chromosomes. To illustrate the tremendous variety possible when you begin to combine genes, you and a classmate will establish...
    1,358 Words | 5 Pages
  • PRACTICAL 2 MITOSIS - 397 Words
    PRACTICAL 2 Title: Modelling of mitosis Objectives: To represent the pairs of homologous chromosomes by using pairs of model chromosomes. Introduction: Materials: 1. Noodles 2. Cutter Method: 1. The pair of model chromosomes is used to demonstrate how the two chromosomes line up at the beginning of mitosis. 2. After that the way of the sister chromatids of each chromosome separate into two separate chromosomes is demonstrated. 3. The spindle fibers that pull the sister chromatids apart is...
    397 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cru de Chat - 1028 Words
    Cri Du Chat Syndrome Introduction Cri du chat syndrome also known as 5p syndrome and cat cry syndrome - is a rare genetic condition that is caused by the deletion (a missing piece) of genetic material on the small arm of chromosome 5. Cri du Chat is a genetic disorder first described and named in 1963 by Jerome Lejeune. Cri-du-Chat means "cat's cry" in French. The disorder causes the baby to produce a high pitched and cat like cry because of the structural abnormality and low...
    1,028 Words | 3 Pages
  • What are some similarities and differences between mitosis and meiosis?
    Between meiosis and mitosis there are many unique similarities and differences such that mitosis has four stages and meiosis has eight. Or a similarity where they both have no new gene combination when each of the cells splits after each of their processes. Many more of these similarities and differences will be explained throughout the text. Many similarities occur between meiosis and mitosis such that each process, after it has been gone through, result in no new gene combination. Each new...
    425 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effects of Gutkha Using Allium Cepa Assay
    Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effects of Gutkha using Allium cepa Assay EKTA BHATTACHARYA Roll BGC/BOT No. 112001 M.Sc Semester IV Examination 2013 Under the supervision of Dr. Shyamal Kr. Chakraborty Associate Professor, Cytogenetics Laboratory, PG Dept of Botany, Barasat Government College Cytotoxic And Genotoxic Effects of Gutkha using Allium cepa Assay EKTA BHATTACHARYA Roll BGC/BOT No. 112001 M.Sc...
    5,168 Words | 18 Pages
  • sex linked genetic disorders
    Sex linked genetic disorders Fragile x syndrome Sex-linked traits are genetic characteristics determined by genes located on sex chromosomes. Genes are pieces of DNA on chromosomes that carry information that are responsible for inheriting traits. Different forms of the same gene are called alleles. One allele for a certain trait is inherited from a mother and one from a father. These traits are passed down from parent to their offspring by sexual reproduction. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) or...
    307 Words | 1 Page
  • Zygote - 472 Words
     Define the terms zygote, chromosomes, genes, and DNA, and explain how they are related. What do you think of when you hear the words zygote, chromosomes, genes and deoxyribonucleic acid also known as DNA? Those words all are contribute of the genetic make-up of your life. Zygote, chromosomes, genes and DNA are all related. They are extremely important in life and we need those to even be here today. Without those we are nothing. The zygote is a single cell formed at conception. The zygote...
    472 Words | 2 Pages
  • Anthropology 101 Research Paper
    Komron Sabbagh Prof. Rowe Anthropology 101 March 25, 2013 Elderly Human “Y” Chromosome The unearthing and examination of a tremendously infrequent African American “Y” chromosome goes back in time with regards to the most recent common ancestor for the “Y” chromosome ancestry to 338,000 years ago. This period exists even older than the age of the most eldest known structurally contemporary human fossils. University of Arizona geneticists have revealed the most ancient known hereditary...
    836 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cat Eye Syndrome - 283 Words
    Cat Eye syndrome Cat eye syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder that may be plain to see at birth. The name "cat eye syndrome" comes from a distinctive abnormality in the eye that is shown in some affected people. This feature consists of partial absence of ocular tissue often affecting both eyes. Affected ocular tissues may include the colored region, the middle layer, and/or the innermost membrane of the eye. Individuals with cat eye syndrome frequently have coloboma(s) (which is a...
    283 Words | 1 Page
  • biology - 2631 Words
    Name___________________________________ Score________________ Section___________________________________ Date_________________ EXERCISE NO. 1a MITOSIS OBJECTIVES The students should be able to: 1. identify the different steps involved in mitosis and meiosis; 2. describe the behavior of the chromosomes during each stage of cell division; 3. identify specific events in mitosis and meiosis that allow the inheritance of traits and generation of variation. MATERIALS...
    2,631 Words | 16 Pages
  • Computerized Library System - 4149 Words
    Chromosomal aberrations are disruptions in the normal chromosomal content of a cell and are a major cause of genetic conditions in humans, such as Down syndrome, although most aberrations have little to no effect. Some chromosome abnormalities do not cause disease in carriers, such as translocations, or chromosomal inversions, although they may lead to a higher chance of bearing a child with a chromosome disorder. Abnormal numbers of chromosomes or chromosome sets, called aneuploidy, may be...
    4,149 Words | 13 Pages
  • Patho - 2725 Words
    Question 1 1 out of 1 points Which of the following is true about “meiosis”? Select all that apply. Answers: Reproductive cells undergo meiosis Non-germ cells are reproduced Red blood cells undergo meiosis Number of chromosomes reduces by half in phase one Cell divides to produce four daughter cells Response Feedback: Meiosis occurs only in replicating gametes or reproducing cells. In phase one, the number of chromosomes is reduced by half but the chromatid pairs remain together. In...
    2,725 Words | 11 Pages
  • Cell Growth and Division - 384 Words
    Biology 11Name: _____________________ Ms. JamiesonDate: __________ Period: _____ Chapter 8-1: Cell Growth and Division Does your body grow by adding more cells, or by individual cells growing larger? what is the connection between surface area of a cell and how quickly the cell can exchange water, oxygen, food and wastes? what is the connection between volume of a cell and how quickly the cell uses up oxygen and food and produces wastes? What happens to surface area and volume as a...
    384 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chromosomal Disorder - 614 Words
    different chromosomal disorder in humans “GENERAL GENETICS” ASSIGNMENT NO 1 Submitted to: Sir Yasir Waheed Submitted by: Aimen Arshad Submission date: 12.7.13 1. Turner syndrome: (X instead of XX or XY). In Turner syndrome, female sexual characteristics are present but underdeveloped. People with Turner...
    614 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mitosis (I Don't Own This)
    Biology Chapter 10 Notes Pt. 2 The division of nuclear material in which each new nucleus obtains the same number of chromosomes and the same nuclear code as the original nucleus is call mitosis. Mitosis occurs in four phases. Interphase occurs between mitosis. Interphase: Cell contains easily seen nucleus and nucleolus- chromosomes appear as fine dots within nucleus Mitosis: 4 steps Prophase – cell nucleus enlarged –nucleolus no longer visible- chromosomes appear as short strands...
    600 Words | 3 Pages
  • Albinism Research Paper - 1280 Words
    Running Head: ALBINISM ALBINISM Ivy Tech ANP 101 July 9, 2008 What is Albinism? Albinism is a hereditary disorder, which results in little or no production of the pigment melanin. The disorder is not an infectious disease and cannot be transmitted through contact, blood transfusions, or other means. Albinism is usually, but not always, apparent in a person’s skin, hair and eyes. The most recognizable form (called oculocutaneous albinism or OCA),...
    1,280 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Beginnings of Modern Genetics - 540 Words
    GENETIC ENGINEERING: THE BEGINNINGS OF MODERN GENETICS The first scientific investigation of inheritance came from an unlikely place—a monastery garden in what later became Czechoslovakia. There in the 19th century, a monk named Gregor Mendel bred generations of pea plants, observed the way they inherited characteristics, and founded modern genetics. While cell science and evolution theory were advancing, what was happening in inheritance studies? Nothing! Mendel's work was quickly forgotten...
    540 Words | 2 Pages
  • non dis junction - 1140 Words
    QUESTIONS Q1 DISCUSS THE CHROMOSOMAL BASICS OF SEX DETERMINATION The chromosomal basis of sex varies with the organism. In most species, sex is determined by the presence or absence of special chromosomes. As a result of meiotic segregation, each gamete has one sex chromosome to contribute at fertilization. Sex determination is strictly chromosomal and is not usually influenced by the environment. There are two types of sex namely Heterogametic sex: The sex that produces two kinds of...
    1,140 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cell Cycle - 3523 Words
    Biology, 7e (Campbell) Chapter 13: Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycles Chapter Questions 1) What is a genome? A) the complete complement of an organism's genes B) a specific sequence of polypeptides within each cell C) a specialized polymer of four different kinds of monomers D) a specific segment of DNA that is found within a prokaryotic chromosome E) an ordered display of chromosomes arranged from largest to smallest Topic: Concept 13.1 Skill: Knowledge 2) Which of the...
    3,523 Words | 20 Pages
  • Angelman Syndrome. - 1062 Words
    Angelman Syndrome In America, about 6 million students are known to have some kind of intellectual disability. Intellectual disabilities are not always determined by the IQ level of an individual but rather how they react to their peers, self-perception, problem solving, personal care, etc.. It could develop before birth, after birth or even in one’s later life. Usually, these disabilities are caused by mutation in one of the chromosomes of a fetus. For example, some syndromes are the result...
    1,062 Words | 3 Pages
  • Trisomy 5p+- - 747 Words
     Trisomy 5 P +- Student Biology Dr. C. Belin May 8, 2014 Trisomy 5p +- When my son was born, May 17, 1993, I did not know nor did I understand what was going on inside of him and why was he born with two heart murmurs; one in the ASD and one in the VSD, lungs were filled with fluid, under birth weight (5 lbs 12 oz), his ears were lower on one side than the other, and he sounded like a cat when he cried. At Arnold Palmer Hospital in Orlando, FL., they EVAC him and...
    747 Words | 3 Pages
  • study - 977 Words
    Philippine Journal of Science 134 (1): 31-37, June 2005 ISSN 0031 - 7683 31 Merlyn S. Mendioro * , Maria Genaleen Q. Diaz , Maria Theresa B. Alcantara, Oscar J. Hilario, Patrocinio Mateo and Reycel D.M. Maghirang Key words : cytological studies, iron-acetocarmine squash technique, Euphorbia , Moringa , Chrysanthemum , karyotype *Corresponding author: msmendioro@yahoo.com INTRODUCTION Plant products are widely used in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and food industries. Many...
    977 Words | 6 Pages
  • Chromosomal Disorder - 377 Words
    Chromosomal Disorders You will be assigned a random chromosomal disorder. You will research the disorder and answer the questions below. You should include a sketch or picture of the chromosome affected (where the gene is located) or the show the karyotype of the disorder and how it compares to a “normal” karyotype. 1. When was the syndrome first discovered and by who? J. C. P. Williams first discovered it at the year 1961 2. The human chromosomes are numbered. If applicable,...
    377 Words | 2 Pages
  • Student - 1248 Words
    HCR240 Human Pathophysiology Lesson 1 Quiz This assignment is worth 40 points. Please make sure you have answered all questions prior to submitting. Once you click the submit button, you will not be able to return. Question 1 of 40 A 9-year-old patient is admitted to a pediatric unit with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Which of the following traits was this condition inherited from? Sex-linked dominant Sex-influenced Sex-limited Sex-linked recessive Question 2 of 40 A...
    1,248 Words | 11 Pages
  • What does a geneticist do
    What Does a Geneticist Do? By Cindy Grigg nucleus containing contain lead determines organism prevention genetic human sickle-cell muscular career genome specific contains wrinkled determined Directions: Fill in each blank with the word that best completes the reading comprehension. Scientists who study genetics study genes and heredity: how certain characteristics are inherited by offspring because their parents had...
    560 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chapter 15 Test, Biology 7e, Campbell
    Biology, 7e (Campbell) Chapter 15: The Chromosomal Basis of Inheritance Chapter Questions 1) Chromosomes and genes share all of the following characteristics except that A) they are both present in pairs in all diploid cells. B) they both undergo segregation during meiosis. C) their copy numbers in the cell decrease after meiosis, and increase during fertilization. D) they are both copied during the S phase of the cell cycle. E) they both pair up with their homologues during...
    4,871 Words | 24 Pages
  • How to pass everything - 341 Words
    The differences have come through, in part, because of the genetic variations that occur via meiosis. When single cell organisms were the dominate life on the planet the method of reproduction was mitosis which creates identical replicas of the parent cell’s genetic material. This was and still is accomplished through asexual reproduction. With sexual reproduction however, varying arrangements of homologous chromosomes at the metaphase of meiosis I affect the resulting gametes (Simon, Dickey, &...
    341 Words | 1 Page
  • Life Sciences P1 Feb March 2012 Memo Eng Version 1
    NATIONAL SENIOR CERTIFICATE GRADE 12 LIFE SCIENCES P1 VERSION 1 (NEW CONTENT) FOR FULL-TIME CANDIDATES FEBRUARY/MARCH 2012 MEMORANDUM MARKS: 150 This memorandum consists of 11 pages. Copyright reserved Please turn over Life Sciences/P1 (Version 1) (Full-time) 2 NSC – Memorandum DBE/Feb.–Mar. 2012 PRINCIPLES RELATED TO MARKING LIFE SCIENCES 2012 1. If more information than marks allocated is given Stop marking when maximum marks is reached and put a wavy line and ‘max’ in the...
    2,135 Words | 25 Pages
  • LabPaq mitios - 520 Words
    Title: Mitosis and Meiosis Abstract: There are two types of nuclear division, mitosis and meiosis. Mitosis is usually used for the growth and replacement of somotaic cells, while meiosis produces the gametes or spores used in an organism’s reproduction. Hypothesis: Mitosis occurs in whitefish blastula and onion root tip, and it is easily observable. Meiosis and crossing over occurs in the production of gametes and spores. Materials: This lab required prepared slides of whitefish...
    520 Words | 2 Pages
  • Grade 11 Bio - 1785 Words
    LESSON #9 22a) There would be 3 chromosomes present in each of the cells that make up the stomach of mosquito. 22b) Interphase | b | Prophase | C | Metaphase | D | Anaphase | A | Telophase | E | 22c) There would be 3 chromosomes present in the sperm cells of a mosquito. 22d) Interphase | C | Prophase 1 | A | Metaphase 1 | I | Anaphase 1 | E | Telophase 1 | F | Prophase ii | H | Metaphase ii | B | Anaphase ii | G | Telophase...
    1,785 Words | 7 Pages
  • Possibility of Inherited Diseases - 1675 Words
    Running head: Inherited disease The Possibility of Inherited Diseases SC235-03: General Biology I – Human Perspectives Professor Frank Jenkins The Possibility of Inherited Diseases Our bodies are made up of cells and within those cells hold our unique DNA and genetic make-up called genes. Genes are made up of strings of DNA and contain the directions that our bodies use to make the millions of proteins our bodies use (Ireland, 2010). Our genes are further organized into...
    1,675 Words | 5 Pages
  • Lab 8, Mitosis and Meiosis
    Julie Lake November 8, 2012 BIO 111, C11- Online Villalpando, Shawn Lab 8 Title: Mitosis and Meiosis Exercise 1: Mitosis in Animal and Plant Cells Questions: A.) What is the purpose of mitosis? The purpose of mitosis is to create or produce more cells for a living organism. Mitosis occurs when genetic substance in the nucleus divides or separates in order to create more cells. Cytokinesis normally occurs next and the single cell develops into two separate cells. This same process...
    886 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chapter 14 15 Test Corrections
    Emily East November 30, 2014 AP Biology: 4th Hour Chapter 14 & 15 Test Corrections 1.) Why did the F1 offspring of Mendel’s classic pea cross always look like one of the two parental varieties? D. One phenotype was completely dominant over another This answer can be found on page 264 of the book, “All the F1 hybrids produced round seeds; this is the dominant trait for seed shape.” 3.) How many unique gametes could be produced through independent assortment by an individual with the genotype...
    495 Words | 1 Page
  • Biology - 377 Words
    Lab 12: Meiosis kimberleigh Lewis Biology 1408-63400 Consider the Concepts Experiment: 1. A common misconception about meiosis appears when students identify which of the two divisions converts a diploid cell into two haploid cells. Meiosis I is the division immediately following DNA replication and replication does not occur again before meiosis II. However, meiosis I is the "reduction" division when a diploid cell forms two haploid cells. If the DNA duplicated before meiosis I,...
    377 Words | 2 Pages
  • Karyotype activity letter - 676 Words
    Dr Kamyab Shahmiri Dear Mr and Mrs By the process of Karyotyping we can determine the number of chromosomes the individual has. The process of Karyotyping is pairing and ordering all the chromosomes of an organism, providing it with a genome-wide photo of homologous chromosomes of the individual’s cell (karyotype). The way that this is done is that a cell sample is collected and it stops the cell division during metaphase (in mitosis). Then the sample is stained, which produces a banding...
    676 Words | 2 Pages
  • Glencoe Bio Homework 10.2
    Biology homework 10.2 1. How are the cells at the end of meiosis different from the cells at the beginning of meiosis? Use the terms chromosome number, haploid, and diploid in your answer. A: Cells in the begining of meiosis has diploid cells, with a full amount of chromosomes. In the end of meisos, the four genetically different daughter cells are haploid (gametes), they have half the number of chromosomes. Because of this, they are able to fuse with other gametes (ex. egg and sperm) to...
    340 Words | 1 Page
  • Turner Syndrome - 332 Words
    What is Turner’s syndrome? • A genetic disorder which only affects and occurs in females • It is a result of only one X chromosome present in the gamete (monosomy X ) • T.S can also occur if one of the sex chromosomes is partly missing or rearranged • This missing chromosome is responsible for the developmental affects • There is an extremely small chance of the fetus actually surviving How is a person diagnosed? • A person can be diagnosed by taking a sample of blood, amniotic fluid...
    332 Words | 2 Pages
  • Boom and Bust 1920-1941
    ------------------------------------------------- Top of Form | | 1.aneuploidy: a chromosomal aberration in which one or more chromosomes are present in extra copies or are deficient in number. 2.barr body: a dense object lying along the inside of the nuclear envelope in female mammalian cells, representing an inactivated X chromosome. 3.chromosome theory of inheritance: generalization that genes are located on chromosomes and that the behavior of chromosomes during meiosis and...
    559 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mitosis and Meiosis - 745 Words
    1 – Mitosis and Meiosis 1. A certain species has three pairs of chromosomes: an acrocentric pair, a metacentric pair, and a telocentric pair. Draw a cell of this species as it would appear in metaphase of mitosis. (BAP 2.18) 2. A cell in G1 of interphase has 12 chromosomes. How many chromosomes and DNA molecules will be found per cell when this original cell progresses to the following stages? (BAP 2.20) a) G2 of interphase b) Metaphase I of meiosis c) Prophase of mitosis ...
    745 Words | 1 Page
  • Study Guide: General Biology
    Chapter 6 Explain what free energy is and how it can be used to predict the energetic outcome of chemical reactions.Free energy is defined as the energy available to do work in any system. The free energy is denoted by the symbol G. G = H – TS* H: the energy contained in a molecule’s chemical bonds, called enthalpy.* TS: the energy term related to the degree of disorder in the system. T is the absolute temperature (K), and S is the entropy.We can use the change in free energy to predict...
    4,668 Words | 14 Pages
  • yeah do saf - 1070 Words
    the difference between a nitrogenous base and a nucleotide? (I = 2, C = 2) 6) Name five people and describe how they contributed to our current knowledge of DNA (their discovery/discoveries). (A = 5, C = 2) Mitosis 1) A cell with 10 chromosomes undergoes mitosis. Indicate how many chromosomes would be expected in each of the daughter cells. (I = 1, C = 2) 2) During interphase, what event must occur for the cell capable of undergoing future...
    1,070 Words | 5 Pages
  • DNA REPLICA - 331 Words
    DNA molecules are very long. They wrap around proteins and wind tightly, forming structures called chromosomes. A human somatic (non-sex) cell has 23 pairs of chromosomes. Twenty-two pairs are autosomes, which do not differ between the sexes. The autosomes are numbered from 1 to 22, with 1 the largest. The other two chromosomes, the X and the Y, are sex chromosomes. The Y chromosome bears genes that determine maleness. In humans, a female has two X chromosomes and a male has one X and one Y....
    331 Words | 1 Page
  • Conventional Cytogenetic Report - 576 Words
    This report is studying about conventional cytogenetic, and we will focus on a technique called ‘karyotyping’. This repot is going to introduce about the definition, the history and the improvements of karyotyping made before, what is the process and the working principle of this technique and also how if can be applied in our daily life. Karyotyping is a test to examine chromosomes in a sample of cells, which can help identify genetic problems as the cause of a disorder or disease. The term...
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  • Genetics Exam - 1457 Words
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  • Ap Bio Chapter 15 the Chromosomal Basis of Inheritance
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  • Genetic Disorders- Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
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    647 Words | 3 Pages
  • Reasons Women Live Longer Than Men
    Reasons why women live longer then men It is an accepted fact of life that men enjoy certain physical advantages over women. Men are stronger, taller, faster and less likely to be overweight, but they have then tendency to die before their female counterparts. Their date rate is higher than women in many different societies. Women, as a group, live longer than men. In all developed countries and most undeveloped ones, women outlive men, sometimes by a margin of as much as 10 years. In the...
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  • Human Migration Paper - 1052 Words
    Human Migration Since the beginning of time humans have been trying to figure out how our civilization has become the way it is today. Humans have been trying to figure out why we all look so different even though we all come from the same ancestors. Many theories have been brought up in regards to evolution for example the Out Of Africa theory. The Out Of Africa theory argues that all humans descended from a small group of people in Africa, who then spread into the world relocating and...
    1,052 Words | 3 Pages
  • Biomed Unit 4.1 and 4.2 Vocab
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    653 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chapter 13-15 AP Biology Questions
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    1,278 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cri Du Chat Syndrome
    CRI DU CHAT SYNDROME WHO DISCOVERED CRI DU CHAT SYNDROME? In 1963, JEROME LEJEUNE described a syndrome consisting of multiple congenital anomalies, mental retardation, microcephaly, abnormal face, and a mewing cry in infants with a deletion of a B group chromosome (Bp-), later identified as 5p- WHAT IS CRI DU CHAT SYNDROME? Cri-du-chat syndrome is an autosomal deletion syndrome caused by a partial deletion of chromosome 5p and is characterized by a distinctive, high-pitched, catlike cry in...
    825 Words | 8 Pages
  • Williams Syndrome - 1052 Words
     Williams Syndrome Lynamary Torres Chamberlain College of Nursing Pathophysiology II NR282 Summer, 2013 Williams Syndrome For this assignment I chose the disease known as Williams Syndrome. Williams syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition so rare, that few people have ever heard of it. Williams syndrome affects an estimated 1 in 7,500 people (Net, 2013). It is present at birth and affects about the same number of...
    1,052 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sordoria Lab - 1569 Words
    Determining the Crossover Frequency in Sordaria fimicola Introduction Meiosis is an important part of the life cycle that gives rise to the genetic variation in offsprings. Meiosis in fungi differs from those in plants and animals. Fungi are composed of hyphae, which are tubules that make up the frame. These hyphae together form a clump or a mat that is the mycelium (Campbell, 637). The hyphae are key to fungus reproduction. Typically fungi produce large amounts of spores through either...
    1,569 Words | 5 Pages
  • Exam 4 Study Guide BSC2010 2
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    180 Words | 1 Page
  • Genetics - 1148 Words
    Micro-deletion syndromes Di- George syndrome Aetiology Deletion of part of the long arm in chromosome 22 at location 22q11.2(1) The most common deletion includes the TBX1 gene (85% individuals), see figure 1 below. Defect in neural-crest tissue (thyroid, thymus, and conotruncal septum of the heart) due deletion of region in chromosome 22 (2) Inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant (2) Hypoplasia of thymus and parathyroid glands resulting in hypocalcemia Acronym CATCH22 is used...
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  • Trisomy 22 - 270 Words
    Trisomy 22 is a chromosomal disorder in which there are 3 copies of chromosome 22 rather than 2. This disorder is found in people with an extra copy or a variation of chromosome 22 in every cell of their body. The chromosomal notation for this disorder would be 47, XY, +22. There are many different disorders associated with trisomy 22 such as Emanuel Syndrome, 22q11 Deletion Syndrome, 22q11 Microduplication Syndrome, Phelan-McDermid Syndrome, Chromosome Ring, Cat Eye Syndrome, Mosaic Trisomy 22,...
    270 Words | 1 Page
  • Life Sciences - 2289 Words
    NATIONAL SENIOR CERTIFICATE GRADE 12 LIFE SCIENCES P1 VERSION 2 (OLD CONTENT) FOR PART-TIME CANDIDATES NOVEMBER 2011 FINAL MEMORANDUM – 24/11/11 MARKS: 150 This memorandum consists of 12 pages. Copyright reserved Please turn over Life Sciences/P1 (Version 2) (Part-time) 2 NSC – Memorandum DBE/November 2011 PRINCIPLES RELATED TO MARKING LIFE SCIENCES 2011 1. If more information than marks allocated is given Stop marking when maximum marks is reached and put a wavy line and 'max' in the...
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  • Biology honors reflection - 260 Words
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    260 Words | 1 Page
  • Genetic Counselor - 383 Words
    Case #100011H – Stacy Harris Disorder ? - Hemophilia What is Hemophilia ? - Hemophilia is a rare bleeding disorder in which the blood doesn't clot normally. What causes Hemophilia ? Hemophilia A - lack of enough clotting factor 8 Hemophilia B - lack of enough clotting factor 9 Hemophilia C - lack of clotting factor 11 or Hemophilia is inherited Pattern of Inheritance - The genes associated with these conditions are located on the X chromosome, which is one of the two sex...
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  • Cell Cycle Narrative Essay Bobby Fishburn Spivery
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    535 Words | 1 Page
  • Grade 11 Biology Study Notes
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  • Chromosomal Aberrations - 1994 Words
    Balao, Mike Paul C. MT1311 Chromosomal aberrations are abnormalities in the structure or number of chromosomes and are often responsible for genetic disorders. For more than a century, scientists have been fascinated by the study of human chromosomes. It was not until 1956, however, that it was determined that the actual diploid number of chromosomes in a human cell was forty-six (22 pairs of autosomes and two sex chromosomes make up the human genome). In 1959 two discoveries opened a new...
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  • Module 2: Cell Processes
    Directions: Complete the following quiz, which will be submitted to your instructor for a grade. Multiple choice: Select the best answer for each of the following: For questions 1-4, you need to know that the grey wolf has a diploid chromosome number of 78. Question 1: What is the haploid number for the grey wolf? User's Answer: 39 Question 2: How many chromosomes are there in one full set of chromosomes in the grey wolf? User's Answer: 39 Question 3: How many sets of...
    274 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sex Determination in Plants - 1106 Words
    Sex determination in plants Summary- Evolutionary transitions happened gradually from hermaphroditism to monoec in which multiple sex determining genes are involved which include male-sterility and female-sterility factors. There should not be any recombination between different loci which is the pivotal reason for the genetic degeneration of Y chromosomes. There are several theories attached to Y chromosome degeneration that are reviewed recently . Introduction: why are plant sex...
    1,106 Words | 4 Pages
  • Biology Lab for Mitosis and Meiosis
    Complete the following questions and submit via Blackboard 1. List two events which occur during prophase of mitosis: 1. An aster is formed by fibers radiating from the centrioles of the cell. 2. Chromosomes are formed when the chromatin threads coil and then condense, and these chromosomes are two identical chromatids bound together by a centromere. 2. What is the main occurrence involving the chromosomes...
    474 Words | 3 Pages
  • Turner Syndrome - 1310 Words
    Turner Syndrome Allie Fitzgerald BIOL 150 11/22/11 Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic condition in which a female does not have the usual pair of two X chromosomes (“What is TS?”). This condition was named after Dr. Henry Turner, who was one of the first researchers to describe the features of Turner’s Syndrome in 1930s. TS occurs in about 1 female out of every 2,000 female births, but is much more common in miscarriages. A diagnosis of TS is made through a karyotype test. This is...
    1,310 Words | 4 Pages
  • Lab Discussion - 319 Words
    Ty Yarbrough Introduction The purpose of this lab was to recognize the stages as well as events of mitosis and meiosis in a plant cell or an animal cell. The relative duration of each stage in the cell cycle will also be learned during this lab. By doing this lab we will also create a model of and understand the process of crossing over. This lab also helps students understand the similarities along with differences between mitosis and meiosis. Purpose The objectives of the lab were...
    319 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Sperm and the Egg - 697 Words
    The Sperm and the Egg PSY/265 APA Format The miracle of life is at the same time amazingly complex and alarmingly simple. It all starts with the act of love. During intercourse, a man can ejaculate up to 500 million sperm inside a woman’s vagina. Each sperm carries the father’s genetic code (or DNA). A man’s testes are constantly at work, churning out over 1000 sperm every second (Rathus, 2011). The quality of the sperm depends on the man’s age, lifestyle, his diet, and more. It’s a...
    697 Words | 2 Pages
  • Genomic difference between Humans (Homo sapiens) and Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)
     Canadian University College Genomic difference between Humans (Homo sapiens) and Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) Class: BIOL 424 Professor: Dr. Bruce Butler DUE: Monday December 9th 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction …………………………………………………………………3 Genes (Human Distinction)…………………………………………………..7 Genes (Chimpanzee Distinction)……………………………………………..8 Analysis by DNA sequencing…………………………………………….10 Analysis by proteins and nucleic...
    3,679 Words | 14 Pages
  • Franz Vocci - 3137 Words
     4.1.1 State that eukaryote chromosomes are made of DNA and proteins.(1) State means to give a specific name, value or other brief answer without explanation or calculation. The chromosome is composed of two main molecules. a) DNA b) Proteins called histones. This image was taken shortly after DNA a replication but before the prophase. It is composed of two daughter chromatids joined at the centromere. The chromosome is super coiled by a factor around x16,000. The DNA molecule is...
    3,137 Words | 10 Pages
  • Mitosis Meiosis - 1884 Words
    Mitosis and Meiosis I. These two processes function to pass chromosomes from one cellular generation to the next in a very carefully controlled manner. II. Mitosis and Meiosis are both correctly described as nuclear division; they are never correctly called cell division, or any kind of reproduction. It is possible (and often quite normal) for nuclei to divide when cells don't. And organisms reproduce; nuclei and cells divide. III. Mitosis A. Mitosis is the division of a nucleus...
    1,884 Words | 5 Pages
  • Chapter 8 the Cellular Basis of Reproduction Inheritance
    Chapter 8 The cellular Basis of Reproduction Inheritance Rain Forest Rescue • Scientists in Hawaii are attempting to "rescue" endangered species from extinction by promoting reproduction • Reproduction is one phase of an organism's life cycle – Sexual reproduction • Fertilization of sperm and egg produces Offspring – Asexual reproduction • Offspring are produced by a single parent, without the participation of sperm and...
    3,113 Words | 25 Pages
  • Henrietta Lacks - 380 Words
    Questions The Biology of Henrietta Lacks 1. There are two types of cervical cancer: invasive and noninvasive. What is the difference between the two and how does noninvasive carcinoma grow? 2. Henrietta’s cancer cells grew with mythological intensity. Why do cancer cells grow so rapidly? 3. Cells often behave differently, even cells from the same sample. What gives cells these unique traits? 4. Researchers began to identify chromosomal disorders and discovered that some...
    380 Words | 2 Pages
  • Genetic disease (Opitz G/BBB) research
    Origin and Discovery: In 1969, Dr. John Opitz described two similar conditions that he called G syndrome and BBB syndrome. Further research suggested that these two conditions were one disorder but researchers could not agree on how this disorder was inherited. It wasn't until 1995 that one type of Opitz syndrome was linked to 22q deletion syndrome. The 22q11.2 deletion is now thought to be the original cause of the medical problems for some patients with Opitz G/BBB syndrome. Symptoms...
    942 Words | 5 Pages
  • Ap Bio Lab 7 Cell Division
    Part 2: Effects of Environment on Mitosis. Experimental Hypothesis: If we put onion root tips in IAA solution then the rate of Mitosis will increase. Null Hypothesis: There will be no difference Part 1- Post Lab Question If a cell contains a set of duplicated chromosomes, does it contain any more genetic information than the cell before the chromosomes were duplicated? No, because if it is duplicated, it would have the same number of chromosomes unless there was...
    528 Words | 2 Pages
  • What Is Turner's Syndrome
    Biol 1111 Final Exam Extra Credit Turner’s Syndrome Turner’s syndrome is a genetic condition in which a female does not have the usual pair of two X chromosomes. This medical disorder affects about 1 in every 2,500 girls. I do not know exactly what causes Turner syndrome, but researchers know that it is the result of a problem with a girl's chromosomes either not being there at all or only part of it is still there. I think the most known effects of the condition vary widely with...
    483 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mitosis And Meiosis Of Eukaryotic Organisms
    The cell is the basic unit of all life. All living things-- tigers, trees, elephants, and men-- are made up of cells. A cell is alive-- as alive as you are. It breathes, takes in food, and gets rid of waste. It grows and reproduces, or creates one of its own kind. (Garrod 36) Most cells reproduce by dividing, so that there are two cells where there once was one. (Akkas 78) Every living thing is made up of one or more cells, and each of these cells was produced by an already existing cell. New...
    1,108 Words | 4 Pages
  • Turner Syndrome - 874 Words
     In 1939, Dr. Turner published the first report on the symptoms of Turner Syndrome. It was published as “A Syndrome of Short Stature, webbed beck and infantilism”. It was a report on seven girls who shared similar features to each other. Dr. Turner helped with the advancement of treatment for the girls with the syndrome. He did this by pioneering the use of exogenous sex steroids for treating ovarian failure (“Years of Medical Advances in Turner Syndrome”) . Today, Turner Syndrome occurs in 1...
    874 Words | 3 Pages
  • Genetics and Heredity.Doc - 771 Words
    Genetics and Heredity Genetics and Heredity Why do children so often resemble their parents? Why do some brothers and sisters share similar traits, while others are very different? To a large degree, it's a function of the genes. A gene is a portion of DNA that determines characteristics. Through meiosis and reproduction these genes can be transmitted from one generation to another. Genes are the basic units of heredity — they have in common. How does this happen? Our body is...
    771 Words | 3 Pages


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