Cherokee Essays & Research Papers

Best Cherokee Essays

  • Cherokee Tribe - 480 Words
    Cherokee Tribe ANT 200 September 24, 2013 Samantha Carney & Amanda Vance Summary The Cherokee tribe splits up into three different tribes; Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians, and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Cherokee was one of the first, if not the first non-European ethnic group to become US citizens. This is one of the largest groups with an estimated population of 25,000 members. It is the largest of all of the Southern tribes. The Cherokee Nation had...
    480 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Cherokee Myth - 372 Words
    Once when the Cherokee nation was on the verge of destruction, with only the great Chief Windwalker left to led them. The Cherokee god of nature saw the suffering that his people endured from the heat and wind, but knew not how to help them. He searched the land for a solution to this problem so that his people could survive. The Cherokee god could not find the answer, instead he found a young woman. She was kneeling beside a dried up pond silently praying to anyone who would listen. The young...
    372 Words | 1 Page
  • The Cherokee Removal - 1468 Words
    The Cherokee Removal With the establishment and the settling of the new formed United States, white settlers were consistently encroaching on Indian lands. In order to keep the peace between the settlers and the native tribes, the United States adopted treaties protecting Indian lands from squatters. Presidents such as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson believed the Indians could be “civilized” by adopting farming and giving up their nomad existence. The Cherokee proved that they could...
    1,468 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cherokee Removal - 897 Words
    Cherokee Removal Chapter 2: Georgia was one of the most important in the policy of indian removal and its relation to the Cherokees No state wanted them out more, sent most resolutions, had hard delegation, most press about indian removal Begins in 1802, state and fed gov. negotiated arrangement where Georgia gives up its colonial charter claims to Alabama and Mississippi. In compensation, Georgia gets $1.25 million, congressional agreement to assume responsibility for the legal and...
    897 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Cherokee Essays

  • The Removal of the Cherokee - 5820 Words
    The Removal of the Cherokee The tragedy of the Cherokee nation has haunted the legacy of Andrew Jackson"'"s Presidency. The events that transpired after the implementation of his Indian policy are indeed heinous and continually pose questions of morality for all generations. Ancient Native American tribes were forced from their ancestral homes in an effort to increase the aggressive expansion of white settlers during the early years of the United States. The most notable removal...
    5,820 Words | 15 Pages
  • Cherokee Removal - 2936 Words
    David Pittman HIS 131 I3 September 8, 2012 Cherokee Removal The Cherokee Removal could be said to have begun when England lost the Revolutionary War to the United States. That’s when the people of the United States felt that they could control “uncivilized” people and their land. Of course the Cherokee to those people were “uncivilized” so that meant that they could take over what rightfully belonged to the Cherokee. However, President George Washington and Henry Knox wanted to...
    2,936 Words | 8 Pages
  • Cherokee Indians - 1606 Words
    Cherokee Indians Alicia Stephens AIU Abstract In this paper I will discuss the history of the Cherokee Indians in the United States. First by describing the tribes pre-Columbian history to include the settlement dates and known cultural details. Then a brief description of the cultural and religious beliefs of the tribe will be given, as well as the tribe’s history after contact with settlers. Finally discussing John Ross, who he was and how he affected the Cherokee Indians. Cherokee...
    1,606 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cherokee Essay - 1314 Words
    Vivian Du Us History 5 10/13/14 We Shall Remain post-viewing questions Episode 3: Trail of Tears 1. The U.S. government’s policy of “civilization” was developed at the ending of the American Revolution. It funded missionary organizations to go into Native American nations and teach the Natives how to be Anglo Americans. The Native Americans were being taught how to live the life, an Anglo American believed was a civilized way of living. This policy was introduced to the Cherokees by Thomas...
    1,314 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cherokee Removal - 1325 Words
    The Cherokee people were forced out of their land because of the settler’s greed for everything and anything the land had to offer. Many Cherokee even embraced the “civilization program,” abandoning their own beliefs so that they may be accepted by white settlers. Unfortunately for the Cherokee though, the settlers would never accept them as an equal citizen. A quote from historian Richard White says it very well, “The Cherokee are probably the most tragic instance of what could have...
    1,325 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Cherokee Nation - 567 Words
    The Cherokee Nation’s Appeal to the American People 1. The Cherokee people who wish to not be removed from their own land give various reasons for remaining in their homeland. They say that they should remain in their homeland because the country west of Arkansas territory is unknown to them. They say how all the “inviting parts” of the land or the stay able part is very busy and already preoccupied by other groups of Indians. The other groups of Indians would think of them as...
    567 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Cherokee Indians - 984 Words
    The Cherokee Indians The American Indian History in the Eastern part of the country is always associated with the Cherokee Indian nation. The Cherokee's were by far the largest and most advanced of the tribes when Europeans first arrived and came in contact with Native Americans. There are too many tribes to go over background on every one of them, so I'm going to focus on the Cherokee's since many of their ways and customs are so similar to all the other tribes in the East. When...
    984 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cherokee Removal - 715 Words
     1 The Removal of the Cherokee Tribe Since the early 1700’s, land between the Native Americans and the European settlers have been full of constant battles. Population of the Europeans increases as more settlers expand on the economy, making less room for the land to settle on. During the westward expansion, the Cherokees biggest threat comes from Georgia and their persuasion against congress and the desire to run off the Cherokee. Cherokees have been on the American land possible...
    715 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cherokee Removal - 1870 Words
    Sam Davis Chambers Cherokee Removal essay 11/19/13 Georgia’s campaign for Indian removal begins in the early 19th century. The state of Georgia and the federal government made an agreement that made Georgia surrender its colonial land claims in the present day Alabama-Mississippi border region. Part of the deal insured that the United States government would acquire all the lands held by Indians within the new boundaries of the state as “rapidly as it could be done peaceably and on...
    1,870 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Cherokee Nation - 679 Words
    The Cherokee Nation The Cherokee Nation is are Native American’s who according to 19th century ethnographers originated in the northern portion of the United States in the Great Lakes area’s and eventually migrated south to the Southeastern United States, Georgia, The Carolinas and Tennessee. Eventually the Cherokee’s were forced to relocate in Oklahoma (the authors home). This paper will cover the origins of the Cherokee, The Trail of Tears and some interesting cultural differences and...
    679 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Cherokee Removal - 1146 Words
    A long time before this land was called the United States, the Cherokee people used to live in this land in the valleys of rivers that drained the southern Appalachians. These people made their homes, farmed their land, and buried their dead. Also these people, who are now called Indians claimed larger lands. They would use these for hunting deer and gathering material, to live off of. Later these lands were called Virginia and Kentucky. As it is mentioned in the text, these people had their own...
    1,146 Words | 3 Pages
  • Highly Assimilated Cherokee - 496 Words
    DON HUNT LESSON 5 CHAPTER 9 Writing Assignment Questions How would you describe Jackson’s attitude toward the Indians? Jackson felt the Indians deserved to have land of their own, but land that the government would set aside for them. He still felt that they should be taught the arts of civilizations so they could co-exist with the white man. To what extent was the removal “voluntary,” as Jackson suggested? The removal was “voluntary” only if they wanted to be displaced from...
    496 Words | 2 Pages
  • History of the Cherokee Indians - 833 Words
    History of the Cherokee Indians: Growth to Reduction of the tribes Mary Ruef Axia College University of Phoenix I would like to provide you with some information regarding the Cherokee Indians. I am one quarter Cherokee Indian. My grandmother is full blooded Cherokee and may mother is one half Cherokee. Cherokee comes from a creek word “Cherokee” meaning “people of a different speech” (Cherokee history 1996). There are 561 officially recognized Indian tribes in the...
    833 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cherokee Indian Journal Entry
    Cherokee Indian Journal Friday, June 13th 1838 Today is a day of horror and heartache. My people are being forced off of our territory by United States troops. We the Cherokee Indians live in a peaceful manner. When the Indian Removal Act was forcing us to move off of our territory we were outraged yet we handled it in a mature manner, a lawsuit. We were even victorious, yet they still force us off of our land. The ...
    494 Words | 1 Page
  • Cherokee in the American Revolution - 1976 Words
    The Cherokee tribe inhabited what is present day Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. Being located in what would become the Southeastern part of the United States meant their inevitability in getting involved in the revolutionary war. The Cherokee tribe’s involvement in the American Revolution was both important to the course of the war and resulted in devastation to the tribe. The Cherokee way of life, like all Native American tribes, was very different...
    1,976 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cherokee Survival in Early America
    Cherokee Indians history states that they were natives in the New World. They experienced years of surviving great historical events which began with Western hemisphere explorers coming to the New World bringing sickness, cultural change, and repeatedly invading the native American lands, along with the many wars they were fought in against various factions. Some archaeological evidence indicates that the Cherokee Indians may have come from Mesoamerica and migrated to the north toward the...
    1,606 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Cherokee Peoples’ Trail of Tears
    Nunna daul Isunyi: “the Trail Where They Cried” The Cherokee Peoples’ Trail of Tears History 101 – American History to 1877 Professor Fliegelman February 19, 2011 Why did the relocation in the late 1830s of the Cherokee people come to be known as the “Trail of Tears”? The Cherokee people were forcefully removed from their ancestral lands and relocated to the west, a direction that in their beliefs had been associated with death. The thousand mile trek that...
    709 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sociology Response- Cherokee Tribe
    Symbol- Anything stands for or symbolizes something else Language- a set of spoken or written symbols which enable people to communicate complex information to others Values- Values are standards that provide a means to evaluate the worth of both material and immaterial aspects of culture Norm- Norms are rules for behavior held by a society and may vary widely among cultures Cherokee Indians have a number of symbols to represent the culture. The owl and the cougar are major symbols because...
    723 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Cherokee Removal Book Review
    The Cherokee Removal Book Review The Cherokee Removal is a brief history with documents by Theda Perdue and Michael Green. In 1838-1839 the US troops expelled the Cherokee Indians from their ancestral homeland in the Southeast and removed them to the Indian Territory in what is now Oklahoma. The removal of the Cherokees was a product of the demand for land during the growth of cotton agriculture in the Southeast, the discovery of gold on the Cherokees land, and the racial prejudice that many...
    726 Words | 2 Pages
  • Andrew Jackson and the Cherokee - 1217 Words
    To own land, that is the privilege of whom? To Andrew Jackson the Cherokees current homesteads where on his country’s land. For whatever reason at that time some people living in America weren’t treated as good as there white counterparts. Meanwhile the Cherokees principal chief John Ross felt like that land belonged to his people. If you want to get technical he was speaking on the behalf of a tribe that made up a mere one-eighth of his ancestry. Not exactly a full blooded leader. He also was...
    1,217 Words | 3 Pages
  • Myths of the Native American Cherokee Tribe
    Myths are sacred to all Native American Tribes, and the two popular myths for the Cherokee Indian tribe is The Creation Myth, which explains how the world was made, and the other myth is The First Fire which is about how the fire was discovered. The Cherokees are a very large and powerful American Indian tribe and has a lot of history background and interesting facts. They use their cultural myths in their day to day lives in many different ways. The creation myth is used...
    2,465 Words | 13 Pages
  • “Andrew Jackson Versus the Cherokee Nation”
    “Andrew Jackson Versus the Cherokee Nation” The great Cherokee Nation that had fought the young Andrew Jackson back in 1788 now faced an even more powerful and determined man who was intent on taking their land. But where in the past they had resorted to guns, tomahawks, and scalping knives, now they chose to challenge him in a court of law. They were not called a 'civilized nation' for nothing. Many of their leaders were well educated; many more could read and write; they had their own...
    715 Words | 2 Pages
  • Native American Cultural Assessment: the Cherokee
    The word Cherokee comes from a Creek word "Chelokee" meaning "people of a different speech." In their own language the Cherokee called themselves the Aniyunwiya or "principal people" or the Keetoowah, "people of Kituhwa." The Cherokee are perhaps one of the most interesting of Native American Groups. Their life and culture are closely intertwined with early American settlers and the history of our own nation's struggle for freedom. In the interest of promoting tolerance and peace, and with...
    3,023 Words | 9 Pages
  • The Land: Understanding Why the Land Is Important to the Cherokee Nation
    The Land: Understanding Why the Land is Important to the Cherokee Nation Abstract Most of us have learnt about the Trail of Tears as an event in American history, but not many of us have ever explored why the removal of the Indians to the West was more than an issue of mere land ownership. Here, the meaning and importance of land to the original Cherokee Nation of the Southeastern United States is investigated. American land was seen as a way for white settlers to profit, but the Cherokee...
    4,102 Words | 11 Pages
  • "Trail of Tears - The Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Nation" By John Ehle
    Author John Ehle has written a book that follows the struggles of the early Cherokee people that were torn between the ways of their ancestors and the new régimes that some of their people want to follow. The Cherokee people were confused with how to adapt to their surroundings and to claim their own rights that the current government was denying to them. In the Trail of Tears, Ehle uses many different people and the historic accounts of their actions to tell the story of tragic and unfair deals...
    1,356 Words | 4 Pages
  • Book Review for Trail of Tears: the Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Nation by John Ehle
    INED 411 Book Review Trail of Tears The authors’ name of the book called Trail of Tears: The Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Nation is John Ehle. Trail of Tears was published in the United States by Anchor Books, a division of random house, New York and in Canada. This book was published in September 22, 1989. This book has 424 pages. John Ehle is more than qualified to write on this subject. He has wrote over seventeen books, his first book was published in 1957 so he has over 30...
    812 Words | 2 Pages
  • Describe how the Cherokee and Seminole Indians resisted being removed from their lands east of the Mississippi. How did the Cherokee pattern of resistance differ from the Seminoles?
    In Georgia when gold was discovered, the Cherokee were forcibly removed from their land. The Cherokee sued in the Supreme Court for the right to remain on their land, and the ruling was in their favor. But unfortunately, President Andrew Jackson ignored this ruling. He sent federal troops to remove the Cherokee. With the harsh winter conditions in 1838 the troops succeeded in removing the Cherokee form Georgia, and forced them to march to Oklahoma. The Cherokee and Seminole were Indian...
    569 Words | 2 Pages
  • Andrew Jackson's Indian Policies: Unbridled Aggression or Pragmatic Solution?
    Andrew Jackson's Indian Policies: Unbridled Aggression or Pragmatic Solution? "It seems not to be an established fact that they can not live in contact with a civilized community and prosper." Andrew Jackson believed that Indians were savages, incapable of any "civilized" intercommunication between themselves and whites. Through this belief Jackson declared that Indians need not be in contact with white settlers. Throughout Jackson's life he had fought Indians, beginning with his campaign...
    1,505 Words | 5 Pages
  • Trail of Tears - 850 Words
    Andrew Jackson and the Trail of Tears The Long, Bitter Trail: Andrew Jackson and the Indians was written by Anthony F.C. Wallace. In his book, the main argument was how Andrew Jackson had a direct affect on the mistreatment and removal of the native Americans from their homelands to Indian Territory. It was a trail of blood, a trail of death, but ultimately it was known as the "Trail of Tears". Throughout Jackson's two terms as President, Jackson used his power unjustly. As a man from the...
    850 Words | 2 Pages
  • Appalachian History - 623 Words
    Surname: Course: Lecturer: Date: Introduction The story and history of Appalachia is rich and their shared geography, cultural traits and common historical experience ties the people of Appalachia together. The Appalachian Mountains were inhabited by a diverse population of Native Americans. They included the Iroquois who were the dominant group in the region. They later split into the northern Iroquois and southern Cherokees. The counties of Virginia, East Tennessee, western North...
    623 Words | 2 Pages
  • John Ross and Andrew Jackson
    Affadavit Charge 1: NONE Charge 2: Disobeyed the supreme court ruling of Worcester v.s Georgia by allowing Georgia to enforce its unconstitutional laws concerning the Cherokee nation, my people, and myself. These laws annexed my people’s land to the government of Georgia, abolished our democratic government making our elections illegal, and then raffling off our land to whites. As stated in the court ruling by John Marshall “The Cherokee nation, then, is a distinct community, occupying...
    779 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Trail of Tears - 1622 Words
    The Five Civilized Tribes and the “Trail of Tears” The Indian Removal Act and the “Trail of Tears” was one of the worst tragedies in American history. It shows that the US government was forcing Native Americans to move from their homelands and endure great hardships of famine, cold and harsh weather, long treks on foot, and unfamiliar places with no regards to their safety, culture, history and wellbeing. Since the settling of North America by European colonists, relations between Native...
    1,622 Words | 4 Pages
  • Indian Removal DBQ Google Docs
    Moss 1 Braden Moss Mr. Boyd 10/27/14 1st Period Indian Removal DBQ Ever since the American people arrived at the New World they have continually driven the Native Americans out of their native lands. The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee Indians to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1830s was not the only viable decision Jackson had in view of the issues, but Jackson had many reasons why he thought the decision was valid even though the Supreme Court said it...
    719 Words | 3 Pages
  • Indian removal act - 654 Words
     Indian Removal Michelle True 10:30 mon,wed,fri classes 884352 Mr. Ale The Cherokee land stretched through the southern appellations, the land consisted of beautiful green mountains, filled with trees, tall rock mountains and lakes with high water falls. It was a land of which no other can compare to, “Ridge”, who was born in 1771, grew up in the Cherokee lands, said, “I would willingly die to preserve them.” (2:52). The Cherokee nation had...
    654 Words | 2 Pages
  • trail of tears - 505 Words
    The topic that I decided to use for my research paper is the trail of tears. I decided to use the trail of tears because of its significance to the native American culture and also how this event has gone down as one of the worst moments in American history. The trail of tears included several different tribes like the Cherokee, Seminole and Muscogee tribes just to name a few. These tribes were treated unfairly and many died from starvation and disease during their journey. It began in 1831...
    505 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sam Houston and the American Southwest
    Sam Houston and the American Southwest Sam Houston was born from Scottish-Irish decent. His forefathers were immigrants that had settled in Pennsylvania and migrated south towards Virginia. Houston’s grandfather, John Houston, established the successful Timber Ridge plantation and his father, Samuel Houston, was a member of the revolutionary army, attaining the rank of major. Sam Houston was born in 1793 the middle child of eight siblings. Sam’s father military service took its toll on the...
    3,817 Words | 10 Pages
  • Trail of tears - 603 Words
    Alyssa Pena Trail of Tears The "Trail of Tears" was a hard time for the Indians, The trail of tears was a forced removal of at least twenty thousand Cherokee Indians. The exact number of Cherokees is not quite known. In 1838, the US government moved them from their homelands in the mountain valleys of Appalachian Georgia and the Carolinas to western Indian Territory in present-day Oklahoma. Cherokee call this trail Nunna-da-ul-tsun-yi, meaning "The Place Where They Cried." Traveling through...
    603 Words | 2 Pages
  • Worcester vs Georgia - 301 Words
    I. Worcester V. Georgia A. Facts: 1. Samuel Worcester was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on 19th January,1798 2. Georgia passed 5 laws restricting authority of the Cherokees over their lands a. Included was a law requiring all whites living in a Cherokee Indian Territory, including missionaries and anyone married to a Cherokee, to obtain a state license to live there 3. Samuel Worcester and 6 other missionaries refused to move from a land that was labeled an “Indian territory” a....
    301 Words | 2 Pages
  • Human Society Change - 1015 Words
    Human Societal Change Raven Jordan Anthropology 200 Eastern Kentucky University, Corbin Campus November 24, 2012 Human Societal Change Throughout history, culture and societies, have been ever changing. No one society has stayed the same for a long amount of time. Instead, societies change every day. These changes can come from influences such as, other societies and better techniques. Many societies change even when they do not want to, but by force. Are these changes that are being...
    1,015 Words | 3 Pages
  • Indian Removal - 396 Words
    The Cherokee Removal: Comparison and contrast of John Ross and Elias Boudinot’s views When Andrew Jackson became president his drive of Indian removal started a discussion among all Americans. This controversial discussion was not only between Americans and the Cherokee Indians, but also controversial within the Cherokee people. Some Cherokee saw this conflict in different ways and with different possible outcomes. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 Made these discussions a real part of the...
    396 Words | 1 Page
  • Thirteen Moons - 796 Words
    THIRTEEN MOONS Thirteen Moons is an historical novel published in 2006 by Charles Fraizer. It is set in the mid-nine-teenth century; the novel is based on the life of William Holland Thomas, a confederate Army officer during the American civil war. Thirteen Moons depicts the social and political climate preceding and following the Cherokee removal from the ancestral homeland of the Cherokee nation. Will Cooper is a white orphan boy forced into accepting the dull work as a keeper of a remote...
    796 Words | 2 Pages
  • Silas' House, a Parchment of Leaves
    Corey Campbell English 310 TR 1:30-2:45 4/1/09 Silas House’s, A Parchment of Leaves plays through the life of one of House’s most vivid and compassionate characters, Vine, a full blood Cherokee raised in the rural mountains of Kentucky. House’s use of spiritual surroundings displays the beauty and wonder that structures the novel. As the reader sees Vine grow from young adult, into motherhood, they can see that growth not only can be in wisdom and maturity but by making bonds that...
    692 Words | 2 Pages
  • Native American Art - 270 Words
    Native American Art is the visual works crafted by native people of North America, starting after their arrival on the continent thousands of years ago and continuing until the present. These works may be painted, carved, woven, sewn, or built, and can incorporate such materials as feathers, porcupine quills, tree bark, animal skins and hair, and wood. They encompass a variety of objects, including clothing and jewelry, blankets and rugs, masks, totem poles, baskets, and bowls. Today, some...
    270 Words | 1 Page
  • Andrew Jackson Hero or Misfit
     Andrew Jackson Hero or Misfit America, the nation started on the idea of a nation free from oppression has a dark often shameful history. The Trail of Tears following the Indian removal act is a perfect representation with direct legislature to prove it. Now I have to say that former president Andrew Jackson was a person I greatly admired and often visited the hallowed statue in New Orleans that stands ever vigilant as a visual tribute the man who stood with few to fight the many and came...
    1,704 Words | 5 Pages
  • Sam Houston - 1873 Words
    Sam Houston …came from Scots-Irish descended, family of 9 siblings, born on March 2, 1793. His family were mbrs of the slaveholding gentry of western Virginia. He came from Rock Bridge County in Virginia where his family owned a Timber Ridge Plantation. …his dad, John Houston, served in the revolution as captain in the Daniel Morgan Rifle Brigade. He enjoyed military life and remained in the Virginia Militia after the war serving as a brigade inspector and attaining the rank of major in 1803....
    1,873 Words | 5 Pages
  • Pigs in Heaven Essay - 990 Words
    A Family Of Two Worlds When one is raised in a single family, life appears simple. The person has developed an attachment to their parents. He or she is also familiar with one particular society, and the norms of that society are established in their mindset. However, when a second family from an entirely different culture enters the picture, the simple life becomes more complicated. The cultures of the two families are so different that they clash with one another, leaving the one person...
    990 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sam Houston Book Review
    Sam Houston and the American Southwest were written by Randolph B. Campbell. Currently Professor Campbell teaches at University of North Texas in Denton. He has written many other books including Gone to Texas The history of the Lone star state. This is one of my favorite books; Sam Houston had a very interesting life. As a child he was relentless and rebellious. He had little formal education, but loved to read. He eventually tired of Tennessee and ran away. He crossed the river and lived...
    725 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Importance of Language in Pushing the Bear
    The usage of the Cherokee syllabary throughout Diane Glancy’s novel Pushing the Bear is significant because it expresses the importance of maintaining Cherokee cultural ideals as protest towards the United States government. The nine-hundred mile, four month journey that the Southeastern Cherokee tribes were forced to make in the winter of 1838 threatened to wipe out an entire culture. On the journey, approximately four thousand people lost their lives. As this harrowing story is portrayed in...
    1,201 Words | 3 Pages
  • Indian Removal Act - 449 Words
    The Indian Removal Act The U.S got the Louisiana Territory in 1803. Then during his presidency, Andrew Jackson got Congress to pass the Indian Removal Act. This act stated that all Indians that wished to follow their own tradition must move to the Indian Territory where they would have more than 70,000 square miles of free land. When this act was passed, all Indians but the Cherokee signed the Treaty of Echota agreeing to move. Jackson thought it was necessary to take action against them to...
    449 Words | 1 Page
  • Puritans and Cherokees: Shaping Today’s Perception of the American Dream
    The Puritans and Cherokees: Shaping Today’s American Dream The Puritans during the 1600s wanted change, they wanted to leave the ways of the Old World and set sail to a land of new beginnings and new ideals. After years of corruption and impurities set forth by the church in England, the Puritans began a quest for their own manifest destiny and ventured across the Atlantic Ocean, and established themselves in Massachusetts. John Winthrop, lead these Puritans to the Americas and wrote a...
    784 Words | 2 Pages
  • A CONQUERING SPIRIT - 2541 Words
     A CONQUERING SPIRIT: FORT MIMS AND THE REDSTICK WAR OF 1813-1814 Terry Witt History and Historical Evidence: HI 301 October 14, 2013 In A Conquering Spirit, Gregory Waselkov contends that aggressive American colonization of Creek lands in what is now southern Alabama was the main cause for the Fort Mims Massacre and a continuation of the Redstick War; history seems to support this view without...
    2,541 Words | 8 Pages
  • Unfair Treatment of the Native Americans
    Unfair treatment of the Native Americans- the Cherokee Nation Throughout the 19th century Native Americans were treated far less then respectful by the United States’ government. This was the time when the United States wanted to expand and grow rapidly as a land, and to achieve this goal, the Native Americans were “pushed” westward. It was a memorable and tricky time in the Natives’ history. The US government made many treatments with the Native Americans, making big changes on the Indian...
    1,506 Words | 4 Pages
  • Andrew Jackson Indian Removal
    While Andrew Jackson was president of the United States, he was happy to pursue the news in the relation of the Indians Removal in the 1830’s. I believe Andrew Jackson is in a rush to remove the Indians because it will prevent differences between the General and State Governments on account of the Indians, and it will increase the size of civil populations. In the 1830’s, the Indian Removal was not the only event that was occurring. The Second Great Awakening was happening as well, which was a...
    931 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Indian Removal Act - 1445 Words
    “The Indian Removal Acts” Imagine in today’s society, all of a certain minority being sent to Maine against their will while the public was cheering it on. It is incredibly immoral to do such a thing; yet in the early 1800’s this is basically what happened to the Cherokee Nation of Indians. Starting in 1814, Andrew Jackson wanted to move the Cherokee Indians from their ancestral homeland of North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama, to the present day state of Oklahoma. The Indian...
    1,445 Words | 4 Pages
  • Andrew Jackson and Indian Removal
    The East coast of the United States was burdened with new settlers and becoming over populated. President Andrew Jackson and the government had to find a way to alleviate this over crowdedness and move people to the West. The government passed the Indian Removal Policy in the year 1830, which called for the removal of Native Americans from the Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia areas. It also moved the Seminole capital, Echota, in Tennessee to the new capital called...
    893 Words | 3 Pages
  • Indian Removal Act - 673 Words
    Indian Removal Act On May 28, 1830, Andrew Jackson signed The Indian Removal Act declaring that the government had the power to relocate Native Americans in the southeast to the west of the Mississippi River. The first start of the removal of the Cherokee Indians started in the state of Georgia. Georgia Legislature in 1802 signed a compact giving the federal government claims to western land in exchange for the government to extinguish the Indian titles in the state. Later the Georgia...
    673 Words | 2 Pages
  • Developing Regionalism - 1188 Words
    CHAPTER 9 TIMELINE Developing Regionalism 1790 * South produces 3,135 bales of cotton * Scarcely 100,000 white settlers lives in Trans-Appalachia * Great cities such as Chicago and Pittsburgh are still small villages * Land companies start hawking vast areas of New York, Ohio, and Kentucky to prospective settlers * Huge increase in national population start 1793 * Eli Whitney develops cotton gin, designed to strip fibers from the seeds. Speed up laborers’ work and...
    1,188 Words | 5 Pages
  • How the Indian Removal Act Was Unjust
    it is mainly unconstitutional due to that fact of America's "Manifest Destiny". As American's greed for more land, Indians are pushed further and further west. "This desire for Indian lands was also abetted by the Indian hating mentallity that was peculiar to some American frontiersman. " The Indian Removal itself is unconstitutional due to that fact that Indians were never truly considered Americans or settlers. They had seeked help from the newly appointed president Andrew Jackson but he would...
    386 Words | 2 Pages
  • Red Eagle and the Fort Mims Massacre
    In 1811, the Shawnee leader Tecumseh, with the help of a comet and an earthquake, convinced some of the Upper Creek towns of the Muscogee to turn against the white civilization they had begun to embrace. This led to one of the worse massacres on American soil. The Battle of Fort Mims was orchestrated by William “Red Eagle” Weatherford, and, as news of the massacre spread, Americans found themselves in a war against the angry Creek. Although the massacre at Fort Mims served to ignite war with...
    5,055 Words | 14 Pages
  • Indian Cultural Background - 531 Words
    I have two cultural background which are Cherokee Indian and African American . Cherokee is really pronounced as “CHAIR-uh-kee” in our language. Cherokee comes from a Muskogee word meaning ‘speakers of another language’. Cherokee Indians originally called themselves Aniyunwiya “the principal people,” but today they accept the named Cherokee. But in their language it is pronounced Tsadagi . The Cherokees are original residents of the American southeast region, particularly Georgia, North and...
    531 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sam Houston Summary - 2296 Words
    Sam Houston-Summary Sam Houston had to face many obstacles since he was a little boy. He had very little education; however he educated himself with many readings from his father’s library. Houston served as governor for Tennessee and Texas. He also served as a United States senator for thirteen years. . He befriended General Andrew Jackson and remarried three times. Houston was made the first president of the Republic of Texas in 1836 and was re-elected in 1841. He gave many speeches...
    2,296 Words | 6 Pages
  • Indian Removal Act - 2222 Words
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