Battle of Salamis Essays & Research Papers

Best Battle of Salamis Essays

  • Battle of Salamis - 824 Words
    The Battle of Salamis (Ancient Greek: Ναυμαχία τῆς Σαλαμῖνος, Naumachia tēs Salaminos) was fought between an Alliance of Greek city-states and the Persian Empire in September 480 B.C., in the straits between the mainland and Salamis, an island in the Saronic Gulf near Athens. It marked the high-point of the second Persian invasion of Greece which had begun in 480 B.C. To block the Persian advance, a small force of Greeks blocked the pass of Thermopylae, while an Athenian-dominated Allied navy...
    824 Words | 2 Pages
  • Battle of Salamis - 1598 Words
    The Battle of Salamis The naval battle of Salamis was one of the last great battles of the Greco-Persian Wars, An invasion of Greece by the Persians Led by Persian King forces cunningly defeated Xerxes larger fleet under the leadership of Athenian general Themistocles. Xerxes, the son of King Darius was aggressive in the building of his empire. To get revenge for his late his father's defeat at Marathon, he led an army of 150,000 men and a navy consisting of 600 triremes (war vessels) into...
    1,598 Words | 5 Pages
  • Battle of Salamis and Themistocles - 1895 Words
    Evaluate the contributions of Themistocles to Athens 490 – 480BC Themistocles “was a man who showed unmistakeable natural genius; in this respect he was quite exceptional, and beyond all others deserves our admiration” Thucydides – The Peloponnesian War. He was a pivotal Athenian personality throughout the second Persian invasion. He contributed greatly to the success of the Greek contingent through his tactical mind and his implementation of his ideas. He displayed exceptional skills as a...
    1,895 Words | 5 Pages
  • Battle of Salamis and Miltiades - 523 Words
    Miltiades biggest contribution was to the battle at Marathon which was considered a significant impact on the Persian wars. It was in the battle at Marathon where he showed both witt and skill against the Persian army. He was considered valuable to the athenians because of his former close relations with the Persian army, which meant he knew there tactics and there ways to which they fought in battle. The Athenians made Miltiades 10th Commander to which each day starting from commander one every...
    523 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Battle of Salamis Essays

  • Battle of Salamis and Xerxes Military Decision
    To what extent is Xerxes misinterpreted in both ancient and modern sources? Throughout history, it has been claimed by many that Xerxes, the fourth Persian king of the Great Achaemenid dynasty, was a cruel and intolerant leader, whose actions were more than questionable. However, in a time when Persian and Greek hostilities were quite extreme, due to Xerxes’ military decision to acquire Greece, there were few written sources which were not composed by his opposition or heavily influenced by...
    1,666 Words | 5 Pages
  • Battle of Salamis and Better Strategic Foresight
    Chapter Three: The Greek Golden Age, c. 500-c. 400 B.C.E. 1. How did the Greeks overcome the dangers of the Persian invasions? The Greek chose Sparta as their leader for the war because of its military excellence. The Sparta’s had proven their self from Xerxes army for seven days. The Persians attacked almost all cities. At Themistocles and his political rival Aristides cooperated to convince to tell the cities to fight the naval battle. Themistocles tricked the Persian king into attacking...
    1,232 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Battle of Plataea - 274 Words
    * The Battle of Plataea (Greek: Μάχη τῶν Πλαταιῶν, Machē tōn Plataiōn) was the final land battle during the second Persian invasion of Greece. It took place in 479 BC near the city of Plataea in Boeotia, and was fought between an alliance of the Greek city-states, including Sparta, Athens, Corinth and Megara, and the Persian Empire of Xerxes * * In the summer of 479 BC, the Greeks assembled a huge army (by contemporary standards), and marched out of the Peloponnesus. The Persians...
    274 Words | 1 Page
  • Battle of Thermopylae and Themistocles - 1235 Words
    Assess Themistocles’ role in the Greek defeat of the Persians in 480-479 BC. Themistocles stands paramount above the rest of the Greek figures as the Athenian general, whose abilities as a tactician and strategist thwarted the Persian invasion force into mainland Greece. Described by ancient writer Thucydides as ‘an unmistakable natural genius… and deserves our admiration’, Themistocles was the most influential leader of the Athenian war effort against the Persians. He realised that the Persian...
    1,235 Words | 3 Pages
  • "Battle of Marathon" This essay talks about the great Battle of Marathon during the Persian Wars in ancient Greece 490 BCE
    In 490 B.C.E. the Battle of Marathon was a brief but important event in the war between the Greek city-states and The Persian Empire. The results of the battle had unforeseen effects on Athens and the future of Western Civilization. The Greek 'Golden Age', centred in Athens, brought about new forms of art, the foundations of future philosophy and redirected literature and drama. The achievements of the Athenians during this period were directly connected to the inspiration and prestige (which...
    1,421 Words | 4 Pages
  • Which Is a Better Source of Reliable Information Concerning Salamis – Herodotus' Histories or Aeschylus' the Persians
    Both "The Persians" and "The Histories" contain information regarding the battle of Salamis. "The Persians" is set in the period between the battle of Salamis and the deciding battle of Platea, and although a work of fiction, it has many valuable and useful bits of information. Firstly, it was written earlier than The Histories, by someone who had been in the battle itself. Therefore, most of the information would be accurate to Aeschylus. However, when in the heat of battle, no-one knows...
    286 Words | 1 Page
  • The Persian Wars: How the Greeks Won
    The Persian Wars: How the Greeks Won The Persian Wars were a series of conflicts fought between the Greek states and the Persian Empire from 500-449 BC. It started in 500 BC, when a few Greek city-states on the coast of Asia Minor, who were under the control of the Persian Empire, revolted against the despotic rule of the Persian king Darius. Athens and Eretria in Euboea gave aid to these Greek cities but not enough, and they were subdued by the Persians. The Persians became determined to...
    1,693 Words | 5 Pages
  • Ancient History - 1648 Words
    To what extent was Themistocles responsible for the Greek victory in the Persian wars in 480-479BC? Themistocles was a prominent figure within the Greek battles against the Persians during the periods of 480-479 BC. Themistocles had a major influence in the battles at Artemisium, Salamis, Plataea and Mycale which lead to the Greek victory in the war. Through his unique contributions to the battles, Themistocles had greatly impacted on these victories some majorly others to a small extent,...
    1,648 Words | 5 Pages
  • Artemisia I of Caria 5th Century Bc
    General Knowledge Next Previous Random List Share Twitter Google+ Facebook Pinterest History Top 10 Badass Female Warriors Jamie Frater March 17, 2008 This is a list of the greatest female warriors through history. In order to be selected for this list, the woman has had to be someone who fought in battle herself, not just commanding from a distance, and she had to be real – for this reason people like Hua Mulan are not included as there is a lot of doubt about...
    935 Words | 4 Pages
  • Reasons for the Defeat of the Persians in 490 B.C and 480 - 479 B.C
    “Kings had always been involving and impoverishing their people in wars, pretending generally, if not always, that the good of the people was the object” – Abraham Lincoln. The Persian Wars were a series of destructive and malevolent battles which occurred in the time frame of 490B.C and 480 – 479B.C. The Greek victory over the Persians in the Persian Wars cannot be attributed to only one factor, more it was a commixture of factors. Such factors include unity, leadership, strategy, tactics...
    2,837 Words | 8 Pages
  • Greco-Persian Navy War
    During the Greco-Persian war (500 B.C. - 449 B.C), many battles took place in this bloody war. Battles were fought on land and at sea. Sea battles played a major role during the war. The Athenian Fleet was among the most sophisticated and powerful navies to date that time. The Persian Armada seemed unbeatable with its vast number of ships and soldiers. The Athenian Navy had a higher kill ratio than the massive Persian Fleet. The Persians and the Athenians both used that same type of ship for...
    734 Words | 2 Pages
  • Assess the reasons for the Greek victory over the Persians in 490 to 480/479 BC. Make a judgement based on outcome, results and values.
    Assess the reasons for the Greek victory over the Persians in 490 to 480/479 BC. Make a judgement based on outcome, results and values. The reasons for the Greek victory against the Persians in 490 to 480/479 BC was a mixture of exceptional leadership, skilful tactics and strategy, superior weapons and soldiers, and Greek unity. Strong leadership was the most important aspect of the Greek defence, as without the intelligence and bravery of the leaders, the Greeks would have been easily...
    2,672 Words | 9 Pages
  • Our Debt to Themistocles - 710 Words
    We know nothing of his early life. Themistocles (thuh MISS tuh kleez) was born between 510 and 520 BC and stepped onto the world stage in 490 BC. At that time, the lives of the Greeks were entwined with the imperial ambitions of the Persians, the greatest military power in the world, who had just retreated to Persia from their loss by outnumbered Athenians at the Battle of Marathon. All serious statesmen and military leaders fully expected the Persians to return. In 482, Themistocles challenged...
    710 Words | 2 Pages
  • Intervening War Period - 589 Words
    Explain the preparations of the Greeks and the Persians in the intervening war period of 490 BC – 480 BC. After the Persian failure at Marathon, King Darius planned revenge on the opposing empire, however, died in 486 BC. Succeeding the throne was his son Xerxes who set out to advance with Darius’ planned invasion of Greece. Xerxes planned his attack with new strategies, combining both a land and sea offence. As this would require a large army accompanied by a supportive and communicative...
    589 Words | 2 Pages
  • Victory of Greece in the Greco-Persian Wars
    The Ancient Greek city-states of the 5th century BCE took on one of the most powerful and dangerous empires of the ancient world in a struggle to maintain independence from the Persians. The Persians represented the opposite in ideals of everything that is Greek and threatened the end of political sovereignty, higher thinking, and innovation. Overcoming the Persians was a critical accomplishment by the Greeks in the Greco-Persian wars of the 5th century and can be attributed to their superior...
    1,274 Words | 3 Pages
  • Overview of the Persian Wars - 452 Words
    The start of the Persian Wars is mostly due to Persia. The Persian Empire was very ambitious, and it became well-known for being the largest empire of its time, as it occupied the entire Middle East, parts of Egypt and Libya, and some areas around the Mediterranean. This ambition was what led the Persians into conflict with the Greeks, initially with the Greek cities on the Anatolian seacoast, after the conquest of Libya in 546 B.C.E. At first, the Greek cities allowed Persian rule, but in...
    452 Words | 2 Pages
  • To What Extent Was Themistocles Responsible for Greek Victory in the Persian Wars?
    ------------------------------------------------- To what extent was Themistocles responsible for the Greek victory in the Persian Wars? Daniel Ashby Themistocles was responsible for the Greek victory in the Persian wars to a considerable extent. The key to Athens' strength in the 5th Century BC was in this general and statesman and therefore, as Greek victory relied so heavily on Athens, Themistocles vitally contributed to the outcome of the Persian king’s invasion of 480-479 BC. His early...
    4,252 Words | 13 Pages
  • Similarities in the failures of Xerxes’ invasion of Greece and the Sicilian Expedition
     Similarities in the failures of Xerxes’ invasion of Greece and the Sicilian Expedition On paper, Xerxes and the Persians, along with Alcibiades and his Athenians, would be overwhelmingly favored to win over Greece and Sicily. However, although both the Athenians and Persians not only far outnumbered their opponents in manpower, weaponry, and utilities, they still shockingly were both beaten and sent back to their homelands. The reasons for why two superpowers such as these would...
    1,641 Words | 4 Pages
  • Athenian Trireme - 3378 Words
    THE TRIREME By: Dimitri Oared warships, lie at the heart of the Hellenic civilization's history of which the Trireme is the most famous. In the seventh and sixth centuries BC they transported the colonists from their mother cities to all parts of the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. In 480 BC the Greeks won possibly their most significant battle against the much larger Persian fleet in the narrow waters of Salamis. Athens supremacy at sea was founded upon the crucial role...
    3,378 Words | 9 Pages
  • persian wars - 1112 Words
    Persian Wars Persians wars were sequences of conflicts contested between Persia and ancient Greece, where the two were both ancient civilizations. The Greeks were successions of sovereign city states, and the most influential cities were Sparta and Athens. Athens had numerous celebrated philosophers and thinkers along having the privilege of being the first world’s democratic government. The people of Athens mostly depended on trade to obtain resources to be used to run the government. On the...
    1,112 Words | 3 Pages
  • Herodotus - 1377 Words
    Herodotus c.484 B.C-c.429/425 B.C. Greek historian. INTRODUCTION Called the "father of history" by the Roman philosopher Marcus Tullius Cicero, Herodotus is best known for his long and compelling prose account of life in Greece, Asia Minor, and Egypt which focuses on the causes and events of the Greco-Persian Wars. For Herodotus, history (historiai) meant "inquiry," and his attentions in the History are devoted not just to epic moments in the past, but also to geography, ethnology, and...
    1,377 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Ionian Revolt - 1134 Words
    Significance of the Ionian revolt as a result of the Persian wars. The Ionian Revolt which began in 499BC was the beginning of a chain of events that changed the ancient world, and constituted the first major conflict between Greece and the Persian Empire. It was primarily of significance as the causative agent of the Greco-Persian Wars, which included the two invasions of Greece and the famous battles of Marathon, Thermopylae and Salamis. Ionian cities revolted to gain independence from both...
    1,134 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Second Persian War - 1239 Words
    The alliance of the Persian Empire, ruled by Cyrus the Great, was a major threat to the states of Greece. The solution of the clash between the East and the West was to create the entire future for the region. It was a question of survival for the Greeks; however, for the Persians, occupying Greece was the main focus of the plan. Nonetheless, the Persian Wars were important because the final result was the separation of Greece and the Near East. There was the first Persian war in 490 BC, but...
    1,239 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ancient History Hsc: the Greek World 500-440bc
    To what extent was Themistocles’ contribution the key factor in bringing about a Greek victory in the Persian Wars, 480-479 BC? To a very large extent Themistocles did play the key role in bringing about a Greek victory against the Persians in 480-479BC. His efforts in the pre-war years, his leadership and tactical skills at Artemisium and Salamis, and his persuasive arguments all combined to offer the Greeks hope of victory. However, Themistocles, alone, could not determine the fate of the...
    1,448 Words | 4 Pages
  • Xerxes - 4078 Words
    Family Background and status Xerxes was born a royal prince and would have had all the respect and prestige associated with his status. He was not the eldest son of King Darius I. Darius had three sons by another wife whilst he was still but a lord. For Darius to strengthen his calm to the Persian throne, Darius married Atossa , the daughter of Cyrus the Great. Xerxes was the eldest son of this union. This made Xerxes the son of the king, grandson of the founder of the empire and the son with...
    4,078 Words | 13 Pages
  • Greek Unity - 1772 Words
    Evaluate Greek Unity as the main reason for Greek Victory against the Persians in the years 490BC-479BC. There is much discussion over whether it was Greek unity that caused the victory against the Persians in the years 490BC-479BC. The three main points of view on the matter is that they were not united at all, which can be seen from the accounts of Herodotus, that they were united, which can be seen in the Themistocles Decree and that it was Themistocles himself that made them unified....
    1,772 Words | 6 Pages
  • Persian and Greek Civilizations - 1092 Words
    Greek and Persian civilizations have both left a lasting impression on the modern world with their political, cultural, and military practices. Greeks left a very rich cultural history with their philosophy, literature, and science influencing peoples from southwest Asian to western Europe. The Persians, more specifically the Achaemenid empire, were very successful in expanding and governing a vast empire that included many different types of peoples. They demonstrated...
    1,092 Words | 7 Pages
  • Greek Victory in Second Persian Wars
    Assess the reasons for the victory of the Greeks in the Second Persian War (480–479 BC). The Greeks were victorious in the Second Persian War because of a number of factors. These include the superior leadership from commanders such as Themistocles and Leonidas, the effective Greek strategy and the cooperation of all the Greek city states to unite against a common threat. Ancient historians such as Aeschylus in his play ‘The Persians’ and Herodotus attribute the Greek victory to the so...
    1,276 Words | 4 Pages
  • Aristagoras of Miletus: Father of Western Civilization Complete Essay
    Everyone makes mistakes by saying hurtful things without considering the possible reaction of the other person or resulting consequences if the criticism reaches that individual. In most cases, the prudent thing to do is to remain quiet, keeping personal thoughts private unless the comments are well thought out. In the worst case, open criticisms can ruin friendships or cause deep seated anger, though it can usually be resolved. However, in the case of Aristagoras, a Persian satrap in the...
    4,260 Words | 14 Pages
  • Xerxes' Invasion - 1853 Words
    Xerxes’ invasion of Greece was unsuccessful due to myriad causes. Being a son of a great King Darius, he was coerced to live up to his Father’s name and be as a mighty sovereign as King Darius was. Xerxes’ failure evolved around his mannerisms, as he was a man who was irresolute and need persuasion. Only after he was given that assertiveness, was he able to go forth with decisions. His tactics that he performed during the Battle of Thermopylae and the Battle of Salamis also portray Xerxes’...
    1,853 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Role of Oracles and Dreams in Herodotus' the History
    usChristina Bramanti October 5, 2012 CLAS 20105 The Role of Oracles, and Dreams in Herodotus’ The History Throughout Herodotus’ The History, Oracles, and dreams play an important role. While the gods have almost no presence throughout the book, the Oracles and/or dreams are linked to many of the major events. We first encounter the Oracles in Book I, when Croesus asks the Oracles at Delphi if he should attack the Persians, the Oracle replies telling him (in a very ambiguous way) that...
    1,654 Words | 5 Pages
  • Ancient Athens - 484 Words
    - moved closer to democracy in response to growing economic discontent by farmers. - Athenians studied arithmetic , literature, music, and physical education - Athenians were allowed to develop their own individual talents - Athens became a limited democracy - the Athenians were the first ones credited with establishing government with democratic elements. - Athenian democracy was limited in comparison with today's standards. Only men could participate: women were seen as inferior beings...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • Greek History - 1516 Words
    1. Explain how physical factors impacted human settlement and other socio-economic activity in early Greece. Physical factors will always have an impact in civilization. Human settlement in early Greece relied on the climate, landscape and natural resources of Greece. Socio-economic activity is also affected by these physical factors such as transportation complications, due to rough terrain, and communication ease, such as the time of travel through the ocean. Farming for food is subjected to...
    1,516 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Persian Wars - 1102 Words
    The Persian Wars Eric D. Blanco Persia, known as Iran, was the largest empire the world had ever seen by the 5th century B.C.E. The name Iran derives from the word “Asyran,” and during the first half of the first millennium, the Iranian-speaking people moved gradually into the area of the Zagros Mountains, the largest groups known as the Medes and Persians. According the author of The Greek and Persian Wars 499-386 BC by Philip de Souza, The Persians were part of a group of...
    1,102 Words | 3 Pages
  • Xerxes - 497 Words
    Xerxes Debate – Prosecution Building Programs * Economic decline was related to his excessive building programs. * Even though his building programs were impressive he neglected other parts of the empire. * Olmstead: “Xerxes was more interested in completing the magnificent structures begun by his father than he was in testing the formidable military machine.” * Josef Wieshofer: Persepolis was one of his “favourite past times”, was “hardly independent” of Darius’ style, was an...
    497 Words | 2 Pages
  • Delian League - 1840 Words
    Origin In 480, the Persian king Xerxes invaded Greece, defeated his enemies at Artemisium and Thermopylae, and sacked Athens. Although his navy was severely damaged in the naval battle ofSalamis, it was obvious that the Persians were the strongest. So, the great king recalled many troops. This gave the Greeks the breathing space they needed, and they defeated Xerxes' right-hand man Mardonius at Plataea. More or less at the same time, a Greek expeditionary force attacked the remains of the...
    1,840 Words | 5 Pages
  • Speech Comparison of Xerxes & Themistocles
    Darius I & Themistocle were 2 of many people who played a sig. role in Xerxes’ reign. Themistocles was known as the great Athenian strategist who united the Greekstates & saved Greece. Darius the 1st was the father & predecessor of Xerxes, he played the role of being the most influential person to Xerxes & believed Xerxes was the most deserving to become his heir. Herodotus records that the Persians accounted Darius a ‘merchant’ for his great achievements on setting the empire onto a...
    661 Words | 3 Pages