Auditory system Essays & Research Papers

Best Auditory system Essays

  • Auditory System - 6870 Words
    AUDITORY SYSTEM NOTES Questions 1. What is sound? 1. What are the physical dimensions of sound 2. What are the perceptual dimensions of sound 3. What sounds can humans hear? 2. What is the anatomy of the ear? 3. What are the brain structures and pathways involved in the perception of hearing? 4. How do we localize sounds? Why do we hear? * Communication iHelen Keller felt that being deaf was worse than being blind, because blindness isolated her...
    6,870 Words | 28 Pages
  • Auditory System - 618 Words
    The world contains all kinds of energy that translates into information about what we see, hear, smell, touch and taste. A sensory system is a part of the nervous system responsible for processing specific sensory information. The components of a sensory system include sensory receptors, neural pathways, and parts of the brain involved in sensory perception. To begin, energy from the environment stimulates the receptor cells in whichever sense organ is being used. If this information were...
    618 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ear: Auditory System and Semicircular Canals
    The ear is an organ of the body that is used for hearing and balance. It is connected to the brain by the auditory nerve and is composed of three divisions, the external ear, the middle ear, and the inner ear. The greater part of which is enclosed within the temporal bone. The ear is looked upon as a miniature receiver, amplifier and signal-processing system. The structure of the outer ear catching sound waves as they move into the external auditory canal. The sound waves then hit the...
    1,402 Words | 4 Pages
  • Compare and contrast auditory system and optical system
    Two of the most important sensory systems in human body are optical system and auditory system. Optical system or sometime called visual system involved in the process of taken amount of stimuli and transfer it into some figure that we can perceive as images that make senses. Auditory systems involved in sound wave that transduced by drum ear into some kind of vibration that eventually gets converted back into wave what we perceive as noise. There are a lot of similarities in their mechanisms of...
    534 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Auditory system Essays

  • Auditory Neuropathy - 908 Words
    Auditory neuropathy is a hearing disorder in which sound enters the inner ear normally but the transmission of signals from the inner ear to the brain is impaired. It can affect people of all ages, from infancy through adulthood. The number of people affected by auditory neuropathy is not known, but the condition affects a relatively small percentage of people who are deaf or hearing-impaired. Symptoms and Diagnosis People with auditory neuropathy may have normal hearing, or hearing loss...
    908 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Auditory Canal - 373 Words
    4. Examine the consequences to sound perception if the tympanic membrane increased twofold in surface area. What would happen if the oval window had increased surface area? Would sounds be perceived if the round window became rigid? The tympanic membrane is also known as the eardrum. If the tympanic membrane increased twofold, then it would be able to receive more vibrations thus increasing the sound pressure. This sends stronger vibrations all throughout the middle ear and then the inner ear....
    373 Words | 1 Page
  • The Auditory Sense - 616 Words
     The Auditory Sense or Organ of Hearing The Ear is divided into 3parts: External or outer ear Auricle (pinna) Made of elastic cartilage. Covered by skin placed on the opposite side of the head. External auditory canal Also called the “ear canal” auditory meatus: either of the passages in the outer ear from the auricle to the tympanic membrane. Tympanic membrane The tympanic membrane is a vital feature of the human ear, and is more commonly known as the eardrum. The tympanic...
    616 Words | 3 Pages
  • Auditory Stimuli and Dichotic Listening
    Auditory Stimuli � PAGE �2� University of Phoenix Online PSY 300 - Auditory Stimuli � _Introduction_ There are many different people in this world. Each individual has a different method for processing auditory information. This paper will break down the processing methods of the team members of Learning Team D as a whole. A consensus was met among the team due to a lot of similarities amongst the members of the team. _Open Dialogue_ Paying attention to...
    1,329 Words | 5 Pages
  • Organ System - 612 Words
    The Senses The sensory system involves hearing, touching, tasting, smelling, and seeing, which provide data for perception. The eye is a sensory organ held by an orbit that allows vision (a detection of light in a way that provides mental images of objects) and holds photoreceptors. Photoreceptors are used to absorb light energy, which are bent by a transparent unit called the lens. Some photoreceptors in the eye are the rod cell and cone cell. Rod cells are used in dim light for coarse images...
    612 Words | 2 Pages
  • Central Auditory Processing Disorders (CAPDs) in Children
    INTRODUCTION In the last decade, there has been a push for the early diagnosis and treatment of learning disorders. Now, we’ve all heard of disorders like ADHD and dyslexia, but what about the kids who struggle in the classroom, but have no issues reading, writing or concentrating? Sometimes, children simply don’t hear like the rest of us. These children are affected by central auditory processing disorders, or CAPDs. CAPDs affect how a child interprets and understands what they hear. CAPDS...
    486 Words | 3 Pages
  • Chapter 10 The Nervous System
    Chapter 10 The Nervous System: Sensory systems Perception- the conscious interpretation of the world based on the sensory system, memory, and other neural processes 1. 10.1 General Principles of Sensory Physiology I. The afferent division of the peripheral nervous system transmits information from the peripheral to the central nervous system. a. Sensory receptors- detect the information and respond to specific types of stimulus. b. Visceral receptors-detect stimuli that arise within the body....
    7,300 Words | 24 Pages
  • The Nervous System Ppt - 281 Words
    The Nervous System By: Brooklynne Harris Scenario A loud crashing sound causes everyone in the room to quickly turn their heads toward the source of the noise. Describe the path of the signal through the human nervous system from initial stimulus of sound to the response of turning the head. Crash and then turn of the head The Journey The loud sound that the person heard is the stimulus. In order to hear a sound, sound waves have to be generated and sent to the cochlea in the inner ear....
    281 Words | 2 Pages
  • Nervous System Anatomy and Physiology Exam Study Guide
    Exam 3 1. Interneuron transmission a. synapse - junction between neuron and other cells (neuron or effecors) 1. she is using junction to make a distinction from synaptic cleft ii. electrical synapes 1. Gap junctions 2. protien channels that connect both cells 3. seen in insects for rapid communication 4. a lot faster iii. chemical synapese 1. - gap between cells 2. the classical synapse 3. 20-30nm iv. Synaptic cleft 1. presynaptic fiber will always an axon a. presynaptic knob -...
    4,685 Words | 25 Pages
  • A developmental study of auditory preferences in infants with Down’s syndrome and non-handicapped infants when hearing familiar and unfamiliar voices singing nursery rhymes
    A developmental study of auditory preferences in infants with Down’s syndrome and non-handicapped infants when hearing familiar and unfamiliar voices singing nursery rhymes The auditory preferences of 20 non-handicapped infants and 20 infants with Down’s syndrome will be studied at the ages of 6 months and 12 months. A digital apparatus allowing infants to choose whether to listen to one of two auditory stimuli will be used as a measurement of their preferences. Sounds used will include two...
    3,664 Words | 13 Pages
  • Sense Organs - 2656 Words
    SENSE ORGANS RECEPTORS (Sense organs) * Transducers of specific forms of kinetic energy * Change mechanical, electrical, thermal, chemical, or radiant energy into nerve impulses in sensory neurons Two major categories: * GENERAL RECEPTORS * Often exist as individual cells or receptor units * Widely distributed throughout the body * Most numerous such as: * touch, temperature, and pain: and * to initiate various reflexes necessary for...
    2,656 Words | 11 Pages
  • PSC 101 Midterm 2
    PSC 101 EXAM 2 Study Guide Part 1- Sensory Systems 1. Sound can best be thought of as a) compression of air molecules by an object. b) changes in air pressure produced by the vibration of an object. c) particles of energy that travel at better than 20 miles per hour. d) packets of energy. e) expansion of air molecules produced by an object as it moves through air. 2. The loudness of a sound is related to a) the amplitude of sound vibration. b) the distance between the...
    3,617 Words | 20 Pages
  • Otosclerosis - 336 Words
    Otosclerosis, also known as otospongiosis, is an abnormal growth of the spongy bone that causes conductive a-typical hearing loss. It usually begins in the labyrinth of the inner ear, and is diagnosed when the growth spreads to the middle ear. The most common presentation attaches the footpad of the stapedius to the oval window, which reduces the overall amplitude of vibrations transmitted to the inner ear. Bony growth may also spread to the stapedius crura and the oval window. It is less...
    336 Words | 1 Page
  • Hearing Loss and Music - 3003 Words
    INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY Hearing loss is defined as diminished sensitivity to the sounds normally heard. Globally, hearing loss affects about 10% of the population to some degree. It caused moderate to severe disability in 124.2 million people as of 2004 (107.9 million of whom are in low and middle income countries). Of these, 65 million acquired the condition during childhood. At birth, around 3 per 1000 in developed countries and more than 6 per 1000 in developing countries...
    3,003 Words | 10 Pages
  • Ap 1 Lab Ex 25 Answers
    Exercise 25 Special Senses: Hearing and Equilibrium Answers to Pre-Lab Quiz (pp. 383–384) 1. three 2. a, auricle 3. tympanic membrane 4. d, stapes 5. a, cochlea 6. otoscope 7. b, Rinne 8. b, internal ear 9. macula/vestibule 10. c, involuntary trailing of eyes in one direction, then rapid movement in the other Answers to Activity Questions Activity 4: Conducting Laboratory Tests of Hearing (pp. 387–388) Acuity Test The threshold is indefinite. Sound Localization No, the sound is less easily...
    1,351 Words | 6 Pages
  • Current Event Paper - 815 Words
    Malala’s Remarkable Recovery and Continued Quest Psychology 121 February 13, 2013 Summary A Pakistani girl was released from a Birmingham, England hospital recently after recovering from two gunshot wounds. Malala Yousufzai, only 15 years old, was shot twice by the Taliban back in October. Malala is an advocate for girls to be educated in Pakistan, after the terrorists banned all girls from schools in her town of Swat, back in 2009. The Taliban do not...
    815 Words | 2 Pages
  • Benifits of Being Blind - 859 Words
    There are probably numerous advantages to being blind, deaf, or both. Most of us just do not think of it as being advantageous because we see it as a loss of a sense, not as a gain of better developing the remaining sense. Some of the advantages of being blind that I can think of are not having visual distractions, saving money by not having to own a car, television (unless you just wanted to listen to it), or any other visually orientated devices, and you cannot see all the negativity in the...
    859 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ta Exam - 1136 Words
    Day Care Procedures: 138 Procedures covered under the sum insured limits. Operations on the ears Operations on the external ear and external auditory canal 1. Incision of the external ear 2. Excision and destruction of diseased tissue of the outer ear 3. Resection of the external ear 4. Wound care of the external ear 5. Construction and reconstruction of the external auditory canal 6. Plastic reconstruction of parts of the external ear 7. Plastic reconstruction of the whole external ear...
    1,136 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Path of Light and Sound - 788 Words
    The Path of Light and Sound By: Kristin Jaskowiak The organ that gives us a sense of sight is our eyes. Of the five senses, our eyes allow us to learn the most about our surroundings. It is important to know the structures and anatomy that make up the eyes to gain a better understanding of how light and images are processed to become sight. ANATOMY The lacrimal gland, or tear duct, produces tears when stimulated by the facial nerve. The delicate, transparent mucous membrane that covers the...
    788 Words | 3 Pages
  • Debashis Dey - 474 Words
    | mastoidectomy is the removal of bone from the mastoid process. This process is located behind the ear canal and contains air cells which drain into the middle | |ear. There removal becomes necessary if they are diseased or if a cholesteatoma, an infected skin cyst in the middle ear andmastoid, is present. | |...
    474 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ap Psych Temporal Lobe and Inner Ear
    Temporal Lobe Where Is It? * Lies roughly above the ears What does it do? * It helps in the processes of perception, face recognition, and object recognition. When damaged? * The Right side Temporal Lobe is involved with visual abilities. * Agnosia- The inability to remember faces. * Prosopagnosia- The inability to remember objects. How does it work? * The eyes send info to the occipital lobes * Ventral stream sends it to the middle and inferior temporal gyri...
    281 Words | 2 Pages
  • Pitch Perception - 1979 Words
    Music & Science Tutorial 2nd Essay question: ‘It might be tempting to assume that the pitch of a complex harmonic tone is simply determined by this lowest frequency component. However, the phenomenon of the ‘missing fundamental’ indicates that this is not the case.’ (STAINSBY) Give an account of the processes involved in the perception of pitch, with specific reference to the missing fundamental. Introduction In order to perceive the pitch of a sound, the mechanical energy of the...
    1,979 Words | 6 Pages
  • Audiology - 1123 Words
     Chapter 3 1. List the five main components of the Cochlear Nucleus Freedom implant and briefly describe how it works. Head piece coil Microphone cover Battery Controller cord jack Body-worn controller Brief Description: The Nucleus Freedom cochlear implant and speech processor was made by Cochlear Ltd. of Australia. A cochlear implant is an electronic medical device that replaces the function of the damaged inner ear. Unlike hearing aids, which make sounds louder, cochlear...
    1,123 Words | 5 Pages
  • Essentials of Exceptionality and Special Education
    HEARING IMPAIRMENT What is hearing Impairment Hearing impairment refers to defer or damage may occur in any part of the ear, outer ear or middle ear or inner ear. Hearing impairment leads to hearing disability or loss of hearing. What is the causes of hearing Impairment Hearing impairment may be caused both by heredity and environmental factors. 1. Hearing impairment is inherited from parents. Particularly the congenitally deaf children who are born with impairment...
    356 Words | 2 Pages
  • AP Psych Notes:Sensation and Perception of the Ear
    Sensation: Intro Sensation is the process by which our sensory receptors and nervous system receive and represent stimulus energies from our environment. Perception is the process of organizing and interpreting sensory information enabling us to recognize meaningful objects and events. Bottom-up processing is the analysis that begins with the sense receptors and works up to the brain’s integration of sensory information. Top-down processing is information processing guided by...
    963 Words | 4 Pages
  • midterm study guide - 301 Words
    SHS 150 Midterm Study Guide Spring 2014 This is a tentative study guide to help you prepare for the midterm exam. It does not cover every topic that will be on the exam. It would be wise to review lecture slides, readings, lecture notes & quizzes to adequately prepare for the exam. Good luck, everyone! Definitions: Audiologist Sound wave Sound source Medium Intensity Frequency Wavelength Period Threshold Hearing loss/hearing impairment Concepts: Condensation vs....
    301 Words | 3 Pages
  • Free Response - 385 Words
     Free Response When the dog first barks it creates sound waves that travel through the air, spreading out and dissipating as they go, until they reach the ear of the musician. When the sound waves reach the musician they are “gathered up” into the ear by the oracle and travel into the middle ear. Once in the middle ear the sound waves vibrate the ear drum which transfers the vibrations to the hammer. The hammer then moves the vibrations on to the anvil which transfers them to the...
    385 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chapter 5 Answer Key
    Myers Psychology 6/e Test Bank II CHAPTER 5 Sensation Learning Objectives Sensing the World: Some Basic Principles (pp. 172-177) 1. Contrast the processes of sensation and perception. 2. Distinguish between absolute and difference thresholds, and discuss research findings on subliminal stimulation. 3. Describe the phenomenon of sensory adaptation, and explain its functional value. Vision (pp. 177-188) 4. Explain the visual process, including the stimulus input, the structure of...
    4,881 Words | 32 Pages
  • Mechanism Of Human Behavior - 634 Words
    Mechanism of Human Behavior RECEIVING MECHANISM RECEPTOR   an organ or cell able to respond to light, heat, or other external stimulus and transmit a signal to a sensory nerve. a region of tissue, or a molecule in a cell membrane, that responds specifically to a particular neurotransmitter, hormone, antigen, or other substance. EYES & VISUAL SENSATION  The human eye is capable of seeing only a tiny portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, a portion known as visible light. The eye is a...
    634 Words | 5 Pages
  • chapter 17 - 3768 Words
     Chapter 17: The Special Senses I. An Introduction to the Special Senses The state of our nervous systems determines what we perceive. 1. For example, during sympathetic activation, we experience a heightened awareness of sensory information and hear sounds that would normally escape our notice. 2. Yet, when concentrating on a difficult problem, we may remain unaware of relatively loud noises. The five special senses are: olfaction, gustation, vision, equilibrium, and hearing....
    3,768 Words | 17 Pages
  • Chapter 5 - 1454 Words
    Ch. 5 – Sensory, Attentional and Perceptual Processes 1 Explain the functional limitations of sense organs. Ans. Our sense organs function with certain limitations. E.g. our eyes cannot see things which are very bright or dim. Our senses function within a limited range of stimulation. In order to be noticed by the sensory receptor, a stimulus needs to be of a suitable intensity to be noticed by the sensory receptor, i.e. it has to carry a minimum value or weight. The minimum value of a...
    1,454 Words | 5 Pages
  • therse - 1077 Words
    Classification of receptors: -Stimulus modality: sensation it produces Thermoreceptors: heat and cold. Photoreceptors: eyes, light. Chemoreceptors: chemicals, odors, taste, body fluid composition. Nociceptors: pain receptors. Mechanoreceptors: hearing, physical deformation of a cell or tissue caused by vibration, touch, pressure and stretch. -Origin of the stimulus Exteroceptors: sense stimuli external to the boy. They include the receptors for vision, hearing, taste, cutaneous...
    1,077 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cocktail Party - 7578 Words
    A Review of The Cocktail Party Effect Barry Arons MIT Media Lab 20 Ames Street, E15-353 Cambridge MA 02139 barons@media-lab.mit.edu Abstract The ``cocktail party effect''--the ability to focus one's listening attention on a single talker among a cacophony of conversations and background noise--has been recognized for some time. This specialized listening ability may be because of characteristics of the human speech production system, the auditory system, or high-level perceptual and...
    7,578 Words | 24 Pages
  • Middle Ear - 879 Words
    Anatomy and Functions of the Middle Ear The middle ear contains many important parts that necessary for hearing sounds. The middle ear consists of the structures enclosed in a space right behind the eardrum. They are the tympanic membrane or eardrum. The tympanic membrane is a thin membrane shaped like a drum that separates the outer ear from the middle ear. Next is a chain of three ossicles, or very small bones. The chain begins with the malleus, which is connected to the center of the...
    879 Words | 2 Pages
  • Senses - 1283 Words
    Age related macular disease: Age-related macular disease is a common eye condition among people 50 years and older. It is a leading cause of vision loss in adults. It gradually destroys the macula, the part of the eye that provides sharp, central vision needed for seeing objects clearly. Sometimes age-related macular disease advances so slowly that vision loss does not occur for a long time. In other cases, the disorder progresses faster and may lead to a loss of vision in one or both eyes...
    1,283 Words | 4 Pages
  • AP Practice Questions - 859 Words
    AP* Practice Test Questions 1. The purpose of the pupil is to (a) focus light on the retina. (b) process color. (c) allow light into the eye. (d) enable night vision. (e) detect specific shapes. 2. Cells that can respond to specific edges, lines, angles, and movements are called (a) rods. (b) cones. (c) ganglion cells. (d) feature detectors. (e) bipolar cells. 3. Signal detection theory is most closely associated with (a) vision. (b) sensory adaptation. (c) absolute thresholds. (d) hearing....
    859 Words | 4 Pages
  • Administration of Otic Medications and Ear Irrigation
    Ateneo de Zamboanga University College of Nursing NURSING SKILLS OUTPUT (NSO) Report No. 1 EAR DROPS INSTILLATION & EAR IRRIGATION I. DESCRIPTION: Ear drops instillation: Medication can be introduced into the ear to soften wax, relieve pain, or treat disease. The instillation of medication to the ear is a clean procedure, except when the tympanic membrane is not intact, in which case sterile technique is needed. Ear irrigation: Before an ear can be irrigated, it must be examined...
    1,112 Words | 4 Pages
  • Detailed Lesson Plan in Science Iii(Parts of the Ears
    Detailed Lesson plan in Science III By: Eden C. Landicho I. Objectives At the end of the lesson, the students will be able to: 1. Identify the parts of the ears. 2. Explained the parts of the ears. 3. Participate the group activity given by the teacher. II. Subject Matter Topic: Parts of the ears Reference: Science and Health III Pp31-33 Author: Carmelita C Coronel Values Integration: Valuing the importance of the ears III. Materials Visual aids, picture of ears...
    555 Words | 2 Pages
  • Just-noticeable Difference and Sound Wave
    Study Questions: 1. The physical properties of a stimulus are translated into neural impulses in a process called A. Sensory coding B. Transduction C. Sensation D. Coarse coding 2. Jason is doing a psychology experiment in which he is seated in an absolutely dark room. An initially undetected point of light in front of him is gradually made more intense. With each increase, he is asked if he can see the light. In this experiment, Jason’s ___________ is being measured. A. Difference...
    425 Words | 2 Pages
  • Inner ear structure - 1369 Words
    The Structure of Inner Ear The inner ear is the essential part of the organ of hearing, receiving the ultimate distribution of the auditory nerve. It also called the labyrinth. Inner ear consists of two parts: the osseous labyrinth, a series of cavities within the petrous part of the temporal bone, and the membranous labyrinth, a series of communicating membranous sacs and ducts, contained within the bony cavities. The osseous (or bony) labyrinth: Bony labyrinth is the rigid outer wall...
    1,369 Words | 5 Pages
  • SensationPerceptionWorksheet - 700 Words
    Whitney Barnes: SENSATION & PERCEPTION WORKSHEET a) Briefly describe the path of information from the targeted sensory organ (i.e. eye, ear, skin, etc.) to the brain. Include a synthesis of terms/information from both Chapter 2 - Biological Basis of Behavior and Chapter 3 - Sensation and Perception in your description. When you are using your ears you can choose what you want to listen to, but you cannot choose what you are hearing. The first step is when the pinna collects sounds that enter...
    700 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Mans Life - 345 Words
    Ashley Porter Psychology 201 Chapter 3 Questions 1. I have encountered many smells that elicited memories. First off, the smell of dish soap causes me to remember the different places I have lived. For instance, when I smell a dish soap these days, if it was the kind or fragrance of a dish soap that I used earlier in life, then memories of that apartment, my partner of that time, or my emotional well-being (or lack thereof) will come rushing back to me. The same happens with shampoo and...
    345 Words | 1 Page
  • helllo - 314 Words
    1.Imagine that you are a sound wave. In order, describe the structures of the ear that you would encounter, starting with the outer ear and finishing with the Organ of Corti. pinna, auditory canal, tympanum, ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes), oval window, cochlea, organ of Corti 2.What happens to the energy of sound waves, which travel through air, once they reach the tympanum? When sound waves contact the tympanum they cause it to vibrate. Its vibrations are passed on and amplified...
    314 Words | 1 Page
  • Speech and Language Science Term Paper
     Production and Reception of Pancake Speech and Language Sciences Alexis D’Epagnier Northern Arizona University PANCAKE /pænkek/ Communication is key part of living. Without communication, humans would not be able to function in the organized fashion as we do today. We communicate through writing, speaking and body language. Communication is how we express what we need, what we want and how we feel. It...
    2,166 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Functions of the Eye, Ear and Skin; Their Role in Behavior
    The Functions of the Eye, Ear and Skin; Their Role in Behavior Vision starts with light, the physical energy that stimulates the eye. Light waves coming from some object outside the body are sensed by the eye; the only organ that is capable of responding to the visible spectrum. Eyes convert light to a form that can be used by the neurons that serve as messengers to the brain. The neurons themselves take up a small percentage of the total eye. Most of the eye is a mechanical device that...
    545 Words | 2 Pages
  • Noise pollution - 971 Words
    Maria Fernanda Díaz Noise Pollution: affecting our calm and our health. In the last centuries we have seen the progress in our world: the cities have grown, therefore, we have more buildings and more people, technology and industry reach new goals as days go by; nevertheless, the progress has brought negative consequences too. Every day we talk about environmental problems, but not all of them are taken in account. According to K.S. Vijayalakshmi, “It has been revealed that noise is a...
    971 Words | 3 Pages
  • want to study - 1064 Words
    3/18/2012 Learning Outcomes Procedures in audiology GTP103/2 Introduction to Clinical Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Cheu Lih AW/ March 2012 MClinAud (Melb, Aus), B.Aud (Hons.) (UKM) Lecturer/ Clinical Audiologist School of Health Sciences USM awcheulih@kck.usm.my At the end of the session, students should be able to : • understand procedures in audiolog  describe, in general, methods of assessment in audiology i.e., – – – – –  tympanometry visual...
    1,064 Words | 13 Pages
  • AUDITION EQUILIBRIUM - 2254 Words
    SPECIAL SENSES AUDITION & EQUILIBRIUM Chapter 15 HEARING • Textbook: Pages 570-579 • Review Questions: #19-23 EQUILIBRIUM • Textbook: Pages 580-583 • Review Questions: #24-25, 29 THE EAR – AUDITION & EQUILIBRIUM • Outer, Middle, Inner – Outer + middle: hearing structures – Inner: hearing + equilibrium structures • Audition – sound vibrations move fluids to stimulate hearing receptors • Equilibrium – head movements disturb fluids surrounding equilibrium receptors Figure 15.24a Structure of...
    2,254 Words | 28 Pages
  • HEARING LOSS ENT - 964 Words
    HEARING LOSS BY: NURRASHIDAH BT ABDURAHMAN NABILAH IFFAH BT MD. ARIF ANATOMY OF EAR The ear is made up of three parts 1. Outer ear – consists of pinna and external auditory canal 2. middle ear – consists of tympanic membrane and ossicles (3 tiny bones that are attached to the tympanic membrane which are malleus, incus and stapes) 3. inner ear – consists of oval window, semicircular ducts, cochlea and auditory tube  HEARING – transduction of sound to neural impulses and its...
    964 Words | 11 Pages
  • sensation - 1262 Words
    Sensation Short Essay Questions 1. What are the differences between sensation and perception? Sensation is the process by which our sensory receptors and nervous system receive and represents stimulus energy from our environment. However, perception is the process of organizing and interpreting sensory information, enabling us to recognize meaningful objects and events. Dr. Alfred Adler spoke of the "perceptual schema". It is essentially the framework of your own world in your...
    1,262 Words | 4 Pages
  • Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and Its Prevention
    Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: * What is noise-induced hearing loss? * What sounds cause NIHL? * What are the effects of NIHL? * What are the symptoms of NIHL? * Who is affected by NIHL? * Can NIHL be prevented? * How we hear * What research is being done for NIHL? * Where can I get additional information? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Illustration showing the sound pathway. The sound pathway Every day, we experience...
    1,757 Words | 7 Pages
  • Wind Chimes - 488 Words
    Wind Chimes Wind chimes produce clear, pure tones when struck by a mallet or suspended clapper. A wind chime usually consists of a set of individual alloy rods, tuned by length to a series of intervals considered pleasant. These are suspended from a devised frame in such a way that a centrally suspended clapper can reach and impact all the rods. When the wind blows, the clapper is set in motion and randomly strikes one or more of the suspended rods-- causing the rod to vibrate and emit a...
    488 Words | 2 Pages
  • Prohibition - 2036 Words
     Chapter 5 Outline •Sensation is the detection of physical energy from the environment which weencode as neural signals. •When we organize and interpret our sensations, it is known as perception •The beginning level of sensory analysis is also known as bottom- up processing •Top-down processing is the information processing guided by higher-level mental processes, as when someone constructs perceptions drawing on our experienceand expectations. •Bottom up processing is sensory analysis...
    2,036 Words | 7 Pages
  • PSY340 r4 Week Three Worksheet
    University of Phoenix Material Neurological Structures and Functions Worksheet Short-Answer Essays 1. Describe why humans have a blind spot. There is a point in the eye that were the optic nerve leaves the eye and there are no receptors there to communicate to the brain. Because of this there is a blind spot that does not transmit any images to the brain. (University of Phoenix, 2012). 2. Describe the functional and anatomic differences between rods and cones....
    978 Words | 4 Pages
  • Senses - 955 Words
    THE SENSES Hilgard morgan and Sartain explain that there are more than eight senses that we use to explore and learn about the world.Each of these senses has a specific sense organ within which are receptor cells or receiving mechanisms that are sensitive to certain stimuli in the environment. The Eye Is the organ of vision, is sometimes compared to a camera lens because it works roughly the same way as the latter which focuses images of objects at various distances o the film as it...
    955 Words | 3 Pages
  • Macro Skills - 496 Words
    What makes listening difficult? •Clustering •Redundancy •Reduced forms •Performance variables •Colloquial language •Rate of delivery •Stress, rhythm, and intonations •Interaction Process of Listening •Recognize speech sounds and hold a temporary ‘imprint’ of them in short-term memory •Simultaneously determine the type of speech event •Use ‘bottom-up’ linguistic decoding skills and/or (top-down) background schemata to bring a plausible interpretation to the message, and assign in a...
    496 Words | 3 Pages
  • Perception of Sound - 2641 Words
     Perception of Sound Hearing allows us to do our everyday activities and improves our lives. It enables us to communicate, socialize, and interact in our environment. Good hearing also helps to keep us safe, warning us of dangers or alerting us to someone else’s distress. Hearing is necessary for us to be able to participate in life more fully. Our hearing provides us with a huge source of information; some of it is known to us and some we don’t even notice but when combined, this information...
    2,641 Words | 7 Pages
  • facts about language - 993 Words
    Language should be considered the most precious gift to humans, the one thing that truly distinguishes one ethnicity/culture from the other. Without language, communication would be obnoxious and/or complicated. Throughout this essay I will review the analysis of W.F. Bolton Language: An Introduction; Chapter two of the seventh edition of Language introductory readings. In this chapter Bolton introduces to the readers a series of interesting topics pertaining to language such as “speech...
    993 Words | 3 Pages
  • anaphy lab - 1720 Words
     Hearing and Equilibrium Tests GROUP 8 (1NUR-2) Sumalinog, Rio Tan, Raineer Uy, Jochebed Divine V. Vinasoy, Nina Wilson, Rachel Soriano, Felipe Introduction Our ears are among the most complex of organs. They can pick up air waves and translate them into sounds in our brain, they control our balance, and they define much of how we relate to the world around us. Our ability - or lack of ability - to hear has an impact on almost every aspect of our lives. The human ear...
    1,720 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cochlear Implants - 577 Words
     For people needing cochlear implants, there is not a viable substitute that can serve as a replacement for cochlear implants. One technology that is similar to cochlear implants is hearing aids. Hearing aids consists of a battery, a microphone, an amplifier, and a receiver or speaker. The battery provides power to the hearing aid and the microphone picks up sound from the surrounding environment and converts the sound into an electrical signal. This signal is then sent to the amplifier. The...
    577 Words | 2 Pages
  • hearing impairment - 644 Words
    HEARING IMPAIRMENT Prepared by: Heralyn Tabada Alberca BEED II-3 HEARING IMPAIRMENT Hearing Impairment -the hearing loss that adversely affects educational performance and thereby makes the child eligible for Special Education. (IDEA) Hearing Loss -a degree of hearing loss on a continuum for mild to profound. Hard of Hearing -is a her\aring loss that makes it difficult but not impossible to understand speech through the ear alone, with or without hearing aid. Deaf...
    644 Words | 4 Pages
  • Anatomy of Hearing Including Ear Structures and Brain Structures
    Anatomy of Hearing including Ear Structures and Brain Structures The ear, an organ for hearing and balance, is anatomically divided into three sections: the outer ear, the middle ear, and the inner ear (Henderson). Each section contains many distinct parts that assist in the task of detecting and interpreting sound which is otherwise known as hearing (Henderson). The outer ear is composed of the auricle (pinna) and the external auditory canal (ear canal) (Sisco). The outer ear functions...
    1,073 Words | 3 Pages
  • Charge Syndrome - 993 Words
    Charge Syndrome Introduction Charge Syndrome is a specific collection of non-randomly occurring congenital anomalies. The acronym CHARGE actually stands for the major features of this syndrome. The letter C stands for coloboma of the eye, H is heart defects, A stands for atresia of the choanae, R is retarded growth and development, G stands for genital abnormalities and lastly letter E stands for ear anomalies and/deafness. The cause of this syndrome may be genetically heterogeneous, but...
    993 Words | 4 Pages
  • My Ear infection - 556 Words
    My body temperature was rising up, I felt claustrophobic being trapped inside a plane on the way back home. My sore throat must have been infected for me to get a fever at that moment. I think almost everyone could hear me coughing from my seat so I tried to cough as softly as possible. I took a fever pill and went to sleep. Before I knew it, I’ve already touched down at KLIA. My fever was gone and I felt better. We had dinner that included food like grilled chicken and fried calamari. It...
    556 Words | 2 Pages
  • Deafness - 1501 Words
    “Deafness” Deafness is the inability or lowered ability to hear. It can affect one or both ears, and the onset may be gradual or sudden. The causes are varied, and there are many forms of treatment and devices available to remove or lighten the symptoms. Doctors and researchers have studied the ear to find out exactly how it works and how it affects deafness. Sound is caused by vibrations occurring in waves within the atmosphere. For a normal ear, these sounds waves travel along the outer ear...
    1,501 Words | 4 Pages
  • Career Journal: Audiologist - 847 Words
    Lily Liao Medical Interventions Mrs. Truluck 3/2/15 1.3.2 – Career Journal: Audiologist Description Audiologists help patients with their hearing, balance, or other ear related problems. They are experts in the structures of the ear and can help diagnose and treat hearing issues. Common duties of these workers include identifying, assessing and treating hearing problems and balance disorders, discussing symptoms with patients, documenting treatment, ordering equipment and hiring employees. They...
    847 Words | 3 Pages
  • aging and hearing loss - 1908 Words
    Hearing is one of the traditional five senses, ability to observe sound by detecting vibrations through an organ such as the ear. The sense of hearing is very important because it has helped humans survive. We know what hearing is, but what is hearing loss? Hearing loss happens when there is a problem with one or more parts of the ear or ears. People who have hearing loss might be able to hear some sounds or nothing at all. People also may use the words deaf, deafness and hard of hearing when...
    1,908 Words | 6 Pages
  • How Does the Body Function
    “How Does the Body Function?” Do you consider your body a delicate temple, and do you give any thoughts to the daily functions it provides for you? Well, to name a few, the eyes, ears and skin play a vital role in our lives, and without these precious body parts I believe our life of living free would be limited. Someone once said that “the eyes provide a window to the soul, they also provide us with a window to the world.” Our vision starts when you look at an object; the light from...
    701 Words | 2 Pages
  • Visual Cortex - 1372 Words
    The Visual Pathway 1. Light must pass through the cornea, aqueous humor, lens and vitreous humor before reaching the retina. It must then pass through the inner layers of the retina to reach the photoreceptive layer of rods and cones. 2. When the photoreceptors are stimulated they transmit impulses to the bipolar cells that project to the ganglion cells of retina. 3. The axons from the ganglion cells converge at the optic disc to form optic nerve which enters the cranial cavity through the...
    1,372 Words | 4 Pages
  • What Is Cochlear Damage? - Abstract
    What is Cochlear Damage? The cochlea is a tiny, snail-shaped structure. It is the main organ of hearing and is part of your inner ear. Cochlear Damage means that all or part of your inner ear has been hurt. Damage to the cochlea typically causes permanent hearing loss. This is called sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Many things can cause SNHL, or cochlear damage, including loud or extended noise exposure, certain powerful antibiotics, meningitis, Meniere’s disease, acoustic tumors, and even...
    943 Words | 3 Pages
  • Special Senses - 417 Words
    Q.1. What is the distribution of rods and cones on the retina? What results did we observe from the visual field experiment that confirms this? In your response describe the data collected and correlate the data with the known distribution of rods and cones.(10 points) Rods are very sensitive and respond to very dim light making them best suited for night and peripheral vision. Cones need bright light for activation because they have a low sensitivity but react more rapidly. Cones furnish...
    417 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hearing Sense - 716 Words
    Hearing By: Bryce Wince There is is five different sense of the human body. I believe the most important sense we have is hearing. Hearing is controlled by our ears. The process for how we perceive sound through our ears is detailed, as there are multiple parts of our ears. Sound may not be as important to others as i think it is, but its the most critical sense we have. It is overlooked and it should be appreciated more as it is easy to damage your sense of hearing. The ear contains...
    716 Words | 3 Pages
  • Technical Description - 2152 Words
    A Description of Cochlear Implants A Cochlear Implant is a specialized hearing device that consists of both a surgically-implanted and external component used to simulate natural hearing. This device is used to treat people with severe and profound hearing loss. The implanted component is placed under the skin, behind the patient’s ear, and connected to the auditory nerve of the brain. The Cochlear Implants are designed to receive sounds and convert them into electrical signals that...
    2,152 Words | 8 Pages
  • The World of Sound Around Us
    Living in a world surround by sound Todays world is truly a marvel of its own. We have made extraordinary advances in technology, transportation, education and engineering, but with all the advantages that come with these advancements in the modern world, disadvantages come with it also. We have become well informed about diseases, psychological, and health. Along with this came tons of research on how to be healthier, how to eat correctly and how to take preventative measure to ensure that...
    2,700 Words | 7 Pages
  • Ear, Nose and Throat - 8000 Words
    Introduction The specialty of the Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) system is relatively young compared to certain medical practices. Even to function as a unified discipline, pioneers of the specialty had to wage a protracted struggle to surmount considerable hindrances. Initially confined to managing ear infections alone, the introduction of surgical intervention skills gradually led the specialty to adapt a unified approach. Furthermore, with improved technological advances, the specialty’s...
    8,000 Words | 30 Pages
  • Meniere’s Disease - 2580 Words
    "Auditory System." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. | Meniere’s Disease | Human Anatomy and Physiology Disorder Research Paper | | In 1861, the French physician Prosper Meniere described a condition which now bears his name. Meniere's disease is a disorder of the inner ear which causes episodes of vertigo, ringing in the ears (tinnitus), a feeling of fullness or pressure in the ear, and fluctuating hearing loss. The area of the ear affected is the entire...
    2,580 Words | 7 Pages
  • Listening to Music - 463 Words
    Chapter 1 Listening To Music Why do we listen to music? 1. gives us pleasure 2. affects our minds and bodies 3. Intensifies and deepens our feelings 4. heightens the emotional experience How musical sound and sound machines work. Listening to music—a physical reaction to disturbance in our environment A sound machine creates a vibration and creates sound waves and processed by inner ear and converted into electrical signals and transported by neurons and primary auditory cortex in the...
    463 Words | 2 Pages
  • Marlee Matlin - 299 Words
    Abby Cowit 10-22-12 ASL-7 Marlee Matlin Marlee Matlin is a famous actress who is deaf since she was 18 months old. Marlee has a deformed cochlea, which is genetic. This also means she had a good change that she could not hear when she was born, instead her hearing got worst over the first year of her life. Marlee’s deafness has not stopped her from doing the things she loves. “I have always resisted putting limitations on myself, both professionally and personally.” The...
    299 Words | 1 Page
  • Kirk Williams Comm 218 Communicating Effectively Worksheet
    University of Phoenix Material Communicating Effectively Worksheet Answer the following questions, using information from this week’s readings. Respond to each question in 100 to 200 words. 1. Briefly explain the five choices speakers can make. How do these elements determine a speech’s success or failure? The five choices a speaker can make involves creativity, preparation, style, delivery method, and retention. Creativity is generating resources during learning and examination while...
    889 Words | 3 Pages
  • Microtia - 759 Words
    Microtia Introduction Microtia is a congenital deformity in which the pinna is very small and underdeveloped. This abnormality can be unilateral, affecting only one ear, or bilateral, affecting both ears. Unilateral microtia is most common, in which the right ear is affected more frequently than the left ear. A genetic disturbance results in microtia of the pinna. Many cases of microtia are categorized as idiopathic or of an unknown etiology. Occurring in 1 to 5,000-20,000 births, this...
    759 Words | 3 Pages
  • Case Study 16 - 541 Words
    1.Methyl mercaptan is used to give natural gas its distinctive odor. 2.Yes they can regenerate since there are stem cells (i.e. basal cells) present. These are the only neurons that commonly regenerate. 3.Dan will not be able to taste normally if the olfactory epithelia are damaged, just as a cold reduces taste sensation. Input from the nasal receptors enhances flavor analysis. 4.Although debris did not enter his eyes during the explosion, there was intense light and heat from the explosion...
    541 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Ear and Hearing Loss - 1125 Words
    The Ear and Hearing Loss The ear is the organ of hearing and balance in vertebrates. The ear converts sound waves in the air, to nerve impulses which are sent to the brain, where the brain interprets them as sounds instead of vibrations. The innermost part of the ear maintains equilibrium or balance. The vestibular apparatus contains semicircular canals which in turn balance you. Any movement by the head, and this apparatus sends a signal to the brain so that your reflex action is...
    1,125 Words | 4 Pages
  • Organ senses - 546 Words
    Organ Senses Definition of each Sense Organ 1.) Eyes -The human eye is an organ that reacts to light and has several purposes. As a conscious sense organ, the mammalian eye allows vision. Fun Fact: *In the dark, a substance produced by the rod cells increases the sensitivity of the eye so that it is possible to detect very dim light. 2.) Nose - The nose is the organ responsible for the sense of smell. The cavity of the nose is lined with mucous membranes that have smell receptors...
    546 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Enormous Radio summary - 339 Words
    Jim and Irene live in an apartment with their two children and maid. The both enjoy listening to the radio. One day the radio breaks beyond repair, so Jim tells Irene he is going to surprise her with a new one the following day. When the radio arrives Irene describes it as an ugly large piece of gumwood cabinet. After listening to the radio for awhile Irene realizes it has a lot of interference with the outside appliances which Jim has repaired. After the radio is repaired Irene begins to listen...
    339 Words | 1 Page
  • The Running Experience - 484 Words
    Bezaleel Gonzales PE 2-RUN YZ 2010-34811 September 9, 2012 The Running Experience The first question that was raised towards me went like this: “Why did you choose running?” The question proposed a lot of sense since there is a lot of PE options present in this university. My answer then holds until now. I answered that I wanted to be a bit sporty and to get way from fatness and near to fitness, and also to ditch laziness. I wanted a sport because I never did...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • high pitch distortion perception
    Not ones average Pitch High pitch distortion perception, it’s something not many people know about yet experience every day. I made a couple pitch distortion tests I found in the internet, the topic was entertaining and the best thing about it is I did not know one thing about the topic when I chose it. Everything about this topic is new to me and to be honest, I was scared about this project because I did not know what it was about. It was fun learning about pitch perception because I...
    1,105 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sensation: Color and Absolute Threshold Correct
    3 Sensation and Perception Key: Answer, Page, Type, Learning Objective, Level Type A=Applied C=Conceptual F=Factual Level (1)=Easy; (2)=Moderate; (3)=Difficult LO=Learning Objective SG=Used in Study Guide p=page MULTIPLE CHOICE The ABCs of Perception Learning Objective- 3.1 What is sensation and how does it enter the central nervous system? 1. ______ are the raw data of experience, based on the activation of certain receptors located in the various sensory organs....
    16,158 Words | 64 Pages
  • Properties of Sound Waves - 744 Words
    Sound waves travel in different material A sound wave is a disturbance. When it travels through air, it bounces the air molecules around and they vibrate. They then hit other molecules and cause a chain reaction. In a different material, such as metal, sound actually travels faster. this is because the molecules are much more tightly packed (water is not dense because the molecules just roll over each other, and air is even less dense, with its molecules simply floating). This means the...
    744 Words | 2 Pages
  • Family narrative - 625 Words
    Sophia Brier-Heimbach Ms. Vann English 9 August 22, 2013 Unit 1 Lesson 6 - Family Narrative Hearing loss My grandma started to lose her hearing when she was twenty years old. It has decreased harshly over the years. Her hearing became as weak as four percent. It was very frustrating to deal with for both her and all of us around her. Hearing aids couldn’t handle her loss and she had to have surgery to overcome her...
    625 Words | 2 Pages
  • Eyes Ears Skin - 1163 Words
    Eye Eyes are the most delicate part of our body, as they are the window for us to the outer world. Smoking has been a common habit in the modern world. It causes biochemical changes in our bodies that accelerate aging by encouraging the destruction of collagen. Lazy eyes and cataract are caused due to heavy smoking. Smoking can cause the eyes to sting, water and blink more often. Television has a powerful influence in the lives of most children, computers have turned into an indispensable part...
    1,163 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hearing Impaired - 2479 Words
    Hearing is one of the major senses and like vision is important for distant warning and communication. It can be used to alert, to communicate pleasure and fear. It is a conscious appreciation of vibration perceived as sound. In order to do this, the appropriate signal must reach the higher parts of the brain. Hearing impairment - A reduction in the ability to perceive sound; may range from slight inability to complete deafness HI- it is a distinction between deaf and hard of hearing....
    2,479 Words | 10 Pages
  • Neurological Structures And Functions - 962 Words
    University of Phoenix Material Neurological Structures and Functions Worksheet Short-Answer Essays 1. Describe why humans have a blind spot. Each eye has a blind spot where the axons form at the optic nerve as well as where blood vessels flow in and out of the eye. Since the axons, optic nerve and blood vessels pass through this area, there is no room for receptors. Without receptors, the brain doesn’t receive information about what light is being viewed as there are no neurons to...
    962 Words | 4 Pages
  • Five Senses and How They Work
    The human body has five senses that keep in touch with what is going on in the external world: touch, taste, smell, sight, and hearing. Below I will describe how these senses work. Taste- The tongue is the body part that helps us sense taste. The tongue consists of taste buds (mushroom like projections) which are specific receptors for sense of taste. Each bud contains several cell types in microvilli that project through pores and chemically sense food. Gustatory receptor cells communicate...
    801 Words | 2 Pages
  • theme of justice to king lear
    Listening Skills Questionnaire Date: ____________ Client: Age: Filled-Out By: _____________________ Relationship / Title: Developmental and Environmental History (Please check if applicable) History of ear infections Delayed motor development Delayed speech or language development Emotional trauma, including dangerous or frightening experiences Exposure to loud sounds such as gunfire or loud concerts Ringing in one or both ears (which?_______________)...
    783 Words | 10 Pages
  • Victim from Birth Deaf Essay
    Eng 1a 5-23-13 Essay #1 In the article “Victims from birth” Wendy McElroy, ifeminists.com, is about Sharon Duchesneau and her deaf son named Gauvin. Duchesneau, being a lesbian, selected a sperm donor(along with her partner Candace McCullough). Duchesneau and McCullough are also deaf. The donor they selected was based on his family history of deafness to insure their son Gauvin would also be deaf. Duchesneau goes on to say that Gauvin “is not profoundly deaf… but deaf enough” (McElroy 1)....
    833 Words | 3 Pages
  • Week Three Worksheet - 799 Words
     Week Three Worksheet Cody Mulock PSY 340 October 27, 2014 Teralyn Sell Week Three Worksheet 1. Describe why humans have a blind spot: a. Humans have a blind spot because the spot that the axons meet to form the optic nerve does not have any sensor cells. 2. Describe the functional and anatomical differences between rods and cones: a. Rods: Respond to faint light and are more abundant in the periphery of the eye. Cylindrical shape, similar to a welding rod. b. Cones: Responsible for...
    799 Words | 3 Pages


All Auditory system Essays