Annie Dillard Essays & Research Papers

Best Annie Dillard Essays

  • Annie Dillard - 874 Words
    Hosford 1 Caitlind Hosford King English 8 April 2014 From Backyard Painter to World­Famous Writer Annie Dillard was born on April 30, 1945 as Meta Ann Doak in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She was pushed by her high school teachers and attended Hollins College in Roanoke, Virginia. Dillard studied literature and creative writing. Sometime in her first two years at school she met Richard Dillard, who she would be engaged to marry her sophomore year ...
    874 Words | 1 Page
  • Annie Dillard - 335 Words
    “There are no events but thoughts and the heart’s hard turning, the heart’s slow learning where to love and whom. The rest is merely gossip, and tales for another time.” (Dillard qtd. In Krakauer 200) Annie Dillard was and still is a stay at home wife, as well as an accomplished writer but also a controversial thinker. Her work and views on the world “met both critical and popular acclaim.” (“Annie Dillard” Grolier n.p.) Annie Dillard was born on April 30, 1945 and raised in Pittsburg...
    335 Words | 1 Page
  • Annie Dillard - 511 Words
    Annie Dillard (born as Annie Doak), born in Pittsburgh April 30, 1945, grew up in a household where creativity was a virtue. In her book An American Childhood, she describes growing up with encouraging parents, and her two younger sisters. There were days filled with piano and dance classes, reading books and writing stories in Annie Dillard's childhood, preparing her for her future success. She says she used to be able to read over one hundred books a year on estimation. As a kid, Dillard and...
    511 Words | 2 Pages
  • Annie Dillard Sacrifice - 1934 Words
    Mrs. Cooper’s challenge was to write an essay on Holy The Firm by Annie Dillard. The challenge comes not from being able to sum up enough words in enough time to meet the requirements of this assignment, but from being able to contain such vast information, learned and decoded out of the book, into an essay format, a container so small and structural that, like Annie Dillard did in her own writing, one must carefully decide which thoughts, quotes and ideas are most important, based on your essay...
    1,934 Words | 5 Pages
  • All Annie Dillard Essays

  • Annie Dillard "The Chase"
    In Annie Dillard’s autobiography “The Chase”, she emphasizes and uses great detail in her different writing techniques to make the scenes in the story feel more alive or realistic. The attention of detail can be seen with her intense use of transitions and active descriptions in the actual chase scene. Dillard also uses tone and language of the characters to make the story feel more like actual real time events. In the first paragraph of “The Chase”, the narrator of the story a seven year old...
    368 Words | 1 Page
  • Annie Dillard. Bio Essay
    HEATHER PERPENTE (352)-438-8151 10060 SE 149TH LANE SUMMERFIELD FL, 34491 HEATHER.PERPENTE@SNHU.EDU APRIL 3, 2013 NATALIE PEETERSE SOUTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE UNIVERSITY Annie Dillard started out her writing career misunderstood but admirable. Dillard became well known after her first published book, ‘Pilgrim at Tinker Creek’ won the 1974 ‘Pulitzer Prize for General nonfiction at age 29. She received many complaints on her...
    1,506 Words | 9 Pages
  • Seeing by Annie Dillard - 509 Words
    Summary Response “Seeing” is the second chapter from Annie Dillard’s book, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. Dillard’s mission is to justify how people see and perceive the world. Throughout the chapter, Dillard tries to explain the affects of sight and how it is processed though lightness and darkness. By incorporating her natural surroundings, Dillard can easily portray the many affects of lightness and darkness by the use of vision. The author’s main purpose is to comprehend the meaning of sight in...
    509 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis of "The Wreck of Time" by Annie Dillard
    Will M. Annie Dillard’s “The Wreck of Time” Annie Dillard's "The Wreck of Time" is a unique piece of writing. The essay has no clear thesis statement, lacks transitions between paragraphs and provides no obvious connection between its various subsections. Upon first reading Dillard's piece, one might think that it's little more than a series of unrelated statistics and a series of unanswered questions. But by using this unique style, Dillard puts the focus and thinking in the hands of the...
    1,133 Words | 3 Pages
  • "Terwilliger Bunts One" by Annie Dillard
    Throughout Annie Dillard's "Terwilliger Bunts One", she expresses many feelings and emotions towards her mother. Her mother, a bit of a "prankster," is constantly testing the wits of her peers using the intelligence of her own. Her husband, guests of the home, even complete strangers would lose their composure over these pranks which resulted in many hard feelings towards Dillard's mother. "Pam!" "Dammit, Pam!" "What ails such people?" "What on earth possesses them?" Those are the words of anger...
    545 Words | 2 Pages
  • An American Childhood Written by Annie Dillard
    An American Childhood is written by Annie Dillard in 1987. This short story is about her childhood memory. On a winter morning, seven years old Dillard and her friends were looking for fun on Reynolds Street where they lived, and then they started making ice balls to throw at passing cars. It happened when one of the ice balls hit a black Buick which was running on the street. The driver stopped the car at the side of the road and he got out of the car. Suddenly, he started running toward the...
    296 Words | 1 Page
  • Annie Dillard ' Living Like Weasels" Summary and Response
    Living like Weasels In the essay “Living like Weasels”, the author Annie Dillard wrote about her first encounter after she saw a real wild weasel for the first time in her life. The story began when she went to Hollins Pond which is a remarkable place of shallowness where she likes to go at sunset and sit on a tree trunk. Dillard traced the motorcycle path in all gratitude through the wild rose up in to high grassy fields and while she was looking down, a weasel caught her eyes...
    623 Words | 2 Pages
  • Nature's Impact (Annie Dillard, Mark Twain, and Eudora Welty Comparison)
    The outdoors contains many wonders that a child explores throughout the early years of life; therefore, a person’s childhood tends to position his path for the future. As a result, occurrences seen on an average day sitting at school, exploring in the woods, or examining the stars have the potential to be life changing. An American Childhood (Dillard), “Two Views of a River” (Twain), and “Listening” (Welty) all allocate this thought, yet the works juxtapose each other with different morals....
    837 Words | 3 Pages
  • Dillard living like weasels
    In “Living Like Weasels,” author Annie Dillard’s idea is that humans can benefit from living wild as a weasel. I strongly agree because to live wild like a weasel is to live mindless, free and focused. With these living abilities we as humans will be able get closer to our aspirations in life and do whatever means necessary to get there. Achieving our goals would be easiest if we were to live mindlessly. Living without a mind one wouldn’t have to worry about where time will take them...
    670 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analyzing the Writing of Annie Dilard
    Analyzing the writing of Annie Dillard An analysis of seeing Analyzing the writing of Annie Dillard An Analysis of Seeing What is seeing? According to the New Edition Webster’s Dictionary seeing can be defined as having the power of sight or to view with one’s eyes. This definition describes one aspect of seeing; it does not give a thorough explanation of this...
    1,701 Words | 4 Pages
  • Annie Dillard's "The Chase"
    2/17/12 English 101 Critical Analysis #1 Annie Dillard’s essay, “The Chase”, uses many rhetorical elements in the thesis to reach her audience; some of these include parataxis, climax, and hyperbole. In the essay Dillard states that “The point was that he had chased us passionately without giving up, and so he had caught us.” This helps clarify the thesis as, childhood is a playful time and adults should maintain a playful spirit. “The Chase” is about the author and her...
    900 Words | 3 Pages
  • Annie Dillard's "Terwillinger Bunts One"
    Annie Dillard loved her mother, but her mother was somehow weird. In this essay I’m going to write about how Annie Dillard felt about his mother. Annie’s mother was very unusual, she wasn’t as normal as the other mothers. Andy knew that and she didn’t like that, sometimes she felt proud but at the same time a little embarrassed. Annie knew that her mother was a very liberal woman and she respected that, but sometimes she just didn’t want to be her daughter, like she wanted a “normal” mother,...
    660 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Effects of Literacy in Annie Dillard's "American Childhood"
    Annie Dillard's memoir, An American Childhood, details the author's growing up years and gives the reader many insights into herself. Dillard describes many of the things that molded her during her childhood years, including family, humor, nature, drawing, and sports. At various times during her childhood, Dillard's entire world revolves around one or another of these interests, and each of them shape her personality. Although Dillard's many passions influence her life incredibly, it is reading,...
    957 Words | 3 Pages
  • Annie Dillard's "Handed My Own Life"
    Title: A Family of One With much enthusiasm and ease, Annie Dillard's "Handed My Own Life" tells us a story that many children may relate to. The excitement and wonder that ensnared her mind when Dillard laid her eyes on the much anticipated microscope she received for Christmas, as well as its "ingenious devices," (Chaffee 50) is practically unbearable. In this essay Dillard not only tells us, but shows us the impact of her first scientific observation. After reading The Field Book of Ponds...
    781 Words | 3 Pages
  • Analysis of Annie Dilliard's "Living Like Weasels".
    Analysis: "Living Like Weasels" Annie Dillard Annie Dillard's essay "Living Like Weasels" offers its readers a unique comparison between the life of weasels and the life of human beings. It seems that one of Dillard's principal objectives is to appeal to all types of people so that all can enjoy her writing. Therefore, Dillard uses stylistic choice to make her story more universally understandable. This essay examines four different realms of discourse in detail. In the first two paragraphs...
    901 Words | 3 Pages
  • Essay of an American Childhood - 271 Words
    In Annie Dillard's excerpt from her autobiography, "An American Childhood", she portrays not only the exact moment when every child experiences undulated joy, but also the understanding that they may never have this feeling again. She begins with an explanation of the "fine" (16) sport of football to convey the importance of courage and fearlessness. She states that "if you fl[ing] yourself wholeheartedly" (16) into this sport then "nothing girls [do can] compare with it" (17). Since she...
    271 Words | 1 Page
  • Living Like Weasles - 1281 Words
    “That is, I don’t think I can learn from a wild animal how to live in particular—shall I suck warm blood, hold my tail high, walk with my footprints precisely over the prints of my hands?—but I might learn something of mindlessness, something of the purity of living in the physical senses and the dignity of living without bias or motive.” In “Living Like Weasels”, the author Annie Dillard, encounters a weasel. Typically, in the animal kingdom a weasel is viewed as an unremarkable, and even...
    1,281 Words | 4 Pages
  • Awareness in An American Childhood - 297 Words
    Matt AP Lang 4 December 2012 Awareness in An American Childhood “I sip my coffee. I look at the mountain, which is still doing its tricks, as you look at a still-beautiful face belonging to a person who was once your lover in another country years ago: with fond nostalgia, and recognition, but no real feeling save a secret astonishment that you are now strangers.” In this excerpt from Pilgrim at Tinker Creek Annie Dillard says that she had “no real feeling” for her past lover because now...
    297 Words | 1 Page
  • An American Childhood 1 - 578 Words
    In the excerpt from An American Childhood by Annie Dillard, the reader receives an intimate passage written from a daughter’s point of view of her eccentric mother. Through a unique string of constructive anecdotes and a warm, lighthearted tone, Dillard develops her readers understanding of the qualities she sees in her mother and her positive outlook on those qualities. Though a single quality is not explicit, the passage provides implicit evidence of her mother’s wit, commendable sense of...
    578 Words | 2 Pages
  • Death of a Moth - 645 Words
    When I initially read Annie Dillard’s “Death of a Moth” I barely skimmed the surface. I did not really read between the lines or attempt to get into the author’s head. I simply thought the essay was about a woman who was intrigued by the many bugs that inhabited her home. After a long class discussion, I was able to revisit this piece of literature and select a new grouping of tones. The tones I have chosen to describe this work are as follows: piteous, allusive, and frustrated. As I read the...
    645 Words | 2 Pages
  • American Childhood - 439 Words
    In the except from "An American Childhood" by Annie Dillard, a young Protestant girl apparently living near a Catholic school, St.Bede's, describes here view of the school children and the nuns. As the narrator goes on you can tell she has prejudged these people based on things she has heard, not from her own experience. She states, "From the other Protestants children, I gathered St.Bede's was a cave where Catholic children had to go to fill there brow- and tan workbooks in the dark, possible...
    439 Words | 2 Pages
  • Writing 121 Summary 1
    An American Childhood Annie Dillard is a Pulitzer Prize winning author for non fiction writing. Dillard wrote about an autobiographic event that occurred in her childhood titled “An American Childhood.” The premise of the story is when seven-year old Dillard and a friend were chased relentlessly by an adult after they had thrown a snowball at a passing car. While in the process of reading Annie Dillard’s “An American Childhood,” I was interrupted numerous times, therefore I had to read “An...
    1,169 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Chase - 1571 Words
    The Chase Annie Dillard Annie Dillard is best known for her Pulitzer Prize winning work Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. In this chapter from her autobiography, An American Childhood, Dillard leads us running desperately through snow-filled backyards. Like all of Dillard’s writing, this romp shows an unparalleled enthusiasm for life and skill at expressing it. 1Some boys taught me to play football. This was fine sport. You thought up a new strategy for every play and whispered it to the...
    1,571 Words | 5 Pages
  • Reading Response - 636 Words
    Response Reading: An American Childhood My first reaction to An American childhood was a lot like my own memories when I was a child. I have vivid memories of throwing snowballs at cars driving by, playing football, and hanging with the boys. I related to Annie Dillard more than any author I have ever read. Dillard was not the average type of girl growing up and neither was I. I’m sure though that this relates to many children when growing up and not having a care in the world. She was much...
    636 Words | 2 Pages
  • Night Fright - 282 Words
    WR 121 Annie Dillard A #4 5 July 2013 Shadows of Night: The Fear of a Child In Annie Dillard’s book, An American Child; chapter two describes the fear she had as a child, of the night shadows that would appear on her walls. Dillard was five years old and shared a bedroom with her little sister Amy, who was two at the time. When Dillard describes her little sister sleeping, I can picture her clearly in my mind. Dillard writes; “even at two she composed herself attractively with her sheet...
    282 Words | 1 Page
  • Living Like a Weasel - 1252 Words
    A mind-changing unexpected encounter Didn't we all had one or several moments in life that made you see yourself, the way you live in a whole new perspective? That special moment where it felt like lightning struck you and you changed your perspective of life? For some of you might have been the birth of your child or the moving to a different country? To Dillard it was the unexpected encounter with a weasel. Annie Dillard was born in 1945 and it seems like she always had a thirst for...
    1,252 Words | 4 Pages
  • Onetest - 1084 Words
    html head style typetext/css html, body font-family Open Sans, Arial font-size 11pt line-height 16pt @page size auto margin 25mm 25mm 25mm 25mm span.tab width 2em height 10px display inline-block h1 font-weight 400 padding 0px margin 0 0 30px 0 h4 font-weight 400 font-style italic padding 0 0 15px 0 margin 0 0 30px 0 border-bottom 1px solid black /style /head meta http-equivContent-Type...
    1,084 Words | 3 Pages
  • Testing.doc - 1084 Words
    html head style typetext/css html, body font-family Open Sans, Arial font-size 11pt line-height 16pt @page size auto margin 25mm 25mm 25mm 25mm span.tab width 2em height 10px display inline-block h1 font-weight 400 padding 0px margin 0 0 30px 0 h4 font-weight 400 font-style italic padding 0 0 15px 0 margin 0 0 30px 0 border-bottom 1px solid black /style /head meta http-equivContent-Type...
    1,084 Words | 3 Pages
  • Child and Marginal Places - 962 Words
    Life on the Margin In the short essay “In Praise of Margins”, Ian Frazier puts himself back to the place in time when he did activities just for the sake of doing them. As a kid, Frazier traveled to the woods behind his house without a real sense of purpose. His main goal for the day or afternoon was just to explore, whatever that word may mean to him. Frazier and his friends spent hours on end in the woods simply breaking thin ice sheets, “throwing rocks at a fresh mudflat to make...
    962 Words | 3 Pages
  • Analyzing Terwilliger Bunts One
    In Annie Dillard‟s “Terwilliger Bunts One,” Dillard‟s mother is explained through small anecdotes throughout the story. Through these anecdotes, the reader can grasp how Dillard admires and feels about her mother. Beginning with her mother‟s creativeness to her mother‟s challenging playfulness, the reader can sense, through Dillard‟s writing, admiration and sometimes ambivalence for the qualities Dillard‟s mother holds. The story unfolds in the kitchen when Dillard‟s mother catches onto the...
    627 Words | 2 Pages
  • Thing and Marginal Things - 784 Words
    Importance of Margins In the short essay "In Praise of Margins" Ian Frazier defines marginal people, places, or activities as "... the ones that don't quite work out" (58 Frazier) since they are insufficient to meet the standards of the economic world. However, Frazier shows he values marginal activities and places because they allow people to be themselves without the worry and judgment. For Frazier and his friends, they viewed "The woods" (56 Frazier) as their place of margin Often times...
    784 Words | 3 Pages
  • Changes - 1728 Words
    Changes Each person experiences certain things, even the most simplest and innocent, that enlighten him or her or bring about a revelation. At one point in each of our lives we will or already have had one such meaningful incident. In Annie Dillard’s short essay “Dumbstruck,” she recounts an experience just like that. Dillard’s experience jolts her, bringing to life an awareness of the harshness and inevitability that things happen, things are not permanent in this life. We first learn of her...
    1,728 Words | 4 Pages
  • In Praise of Margins - 859 Words
    “In Praise of Margins” -Argument In the essay “In Praise of Margins,” Ian Frazier elaborates on the idea that margins are needed for the purpose of our own sanity. Frazier believes that “as the world gets more jammed up, we need margins . . . where you can try out odd ideas that you might be afraid to admit to with people looking on.” He believes that by engaging in marginal activities we can manage to avoid most of the stresses this “jammed up” world has to offer. As a child, Frazier’s...
    859 Words | 3 Pages
  • An American Childhood - 468 Words
    An American Childhood In the novel An American Childhood, Annie Dillard, the daughter of a well- to-do Pittsburg family, conveys her social station in life to the reader through many examples. The activities she had as a child, such as piano lessons and dance class, show her family’s wealth. Instead of having to work as a child she shares stories of fun and learning. This is illustrated on page 30, where she is describing the night when her family saw Jo Ann Sheehy skating on the street. As she...
    468 Words | 1 Page
  • An American Childhood CRP - 1600 Words
    An American Childhood Critical Reading Portfolio Entry Section I: Significance of Title The title is significant because many of the aspects of Annie Dillard’s growing up were uniquely American. Things such as the freedom to do certain things as well as the conditions in which everyone lived were characteristics that were not adopted worldwide. The title is also important because much of the book encompassed Annie’s childhood and the process that she followed in her growing up and...
    1,600 Words | 5 Pages
  • Reading Is the Path to Success
    READING GUIDE: MEMORY AND MEMOIR Introduction 1. Before you begin each assigned essay, read about the author’s life (biography). In particular, note literary biography. On our Learning Web, I have a website link for each author we study. 2. Note the titles. What expectations do the titles create? Once you have finished reading each essay, reconsider each title. 3. As you read, note the author’s intertwining of some of the elements of memoir: narration, description (especially...
    1,166 Words | 4 Pages
  • An American Childhood - 352 Words
    Annie Dillard’s “An American Childhood” In Annie Dillard’s “An American Childhood” she takes us the reader back in time. She tells of the activities and games she played as a child, which also draws the reader in to her story more bringing back the same memories from their childhood. She sets the stage around Christmas time on a weekday in late December. Her and her friends were standing in knee deep snow along the road waiting for cars to pass by, an easy target for anyone who could throw...
    352 Words | 1 Page
  • Writer's Duty - 422 Words
    Fernando Alpízar English Language and Composition October 24, 2012 According to the writer´s duty According to the writer´s duty, the duty of an author is to transmit compassion, pity, sacrifice, pride, honor, hope, courage, and love. The three...
    422 Words | 2 Pages
  • Pilgrim at Tinker Creek - 94075 Words
    annie dillard Pilgrim at Tinker Creek for Richard It ever was, and is, and shall be, ever-living Fire, in measures being kindled and in measures going out. —HERACLITUS Contents Epigraph 1 Heaven and Earth in Jest iii 3 2 Seeing 16 3 Winter 37 4 The Fixed 55 5 Untying the Knot 73 6 The Present 78 7 Spring 105 8 Intricacy 124 9 Flood 149 10 Fecundity 161 11 Stalking 184 12 Nightwatch 209 13...
    94,075 Words | 263 Pages
  • American Childhood - 475 Words
    In the book An American Childhood, Annie Dillard tells many different stories throughout her life to support her main purpose. Dillard’s purpose in this book is to show us how we look at everything thing in an aw when we are young, but once we reach a certain age, life just hits us and we don’t see anything in an aw anymore once we reach adulthood. In part one, Dillard shows us her life through her eyes and how she sees everything in that aw. She tells us how amazing it is to find the dime in...
    475 Words | 2 Pages
  • Deer at Providence - 666 Words
    Name: Course: Tutor: Date: Annie Dillard is a renowned essayist; having won the prestigious Pulitzer Prize of 1975 and written a number of books such as Teaching a Stone to Talk (1982), An American Childhood (1987), The Writing Life (1989) among others. In this article, The Deer of Providence, she comes out as a great writer and a lover of nature, who seeks the mysteries and excitement...
    666 Words | 2 Pages
  • This Boys Life - 1115 Words
    Some say that ignorance is bliss, but others may argue that being “awake” is the true gift In life, something which can never, ever be taken away from you. Being able to see everything with “open” eyes only comes with experience and determination, something which the author Tobias Wolfe had seen and felt, but also wanted to deny and oppress for fear of losing his ignorance and innocence. In his autobiographic memoir, This Boy's Life, Tobias lives with only his mother, on account of his...
    1,115 Words | 3 Pages
  • Compare and Contrast - 1581 Words
    Memory Lane “Once More to the Lake” written by E.B White and “An American Childhood” by Annie Dillard are both essays that reminisce about both authors’ childhood experiences. In the novel “Once More to the Lake”, White talks about his favorite spot during his childhood years where he would visit with his family once a month every year. In “An American Childhood” Dillard talks about growing up with her mother and the memories they shared together. Despite the differences between these two...
    1,581 Words | 4 Pages
  • Borges’ Blindness & Dillard’s Seeing
    Borges’ Blindness & Dillard’s Seeing In Jorge Luis Borges’ piece from Ficciones, “Blindness” and Annie Dillard’s piece from Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, “Seeing”, we read writers’ perspectices on their own blindness. The writers contradict the common fallacies our culture has about blindness with their own personal experiences. Although both writers portray blindness in a positive light, each writer uses his disability to enhance his lives differently. Borges depicts his loss of sight as an...
    602 Words | 2 Pages
  • An American Childhood Critical Analysis
    Erik Gottenborg McBride English 102 February 7, 2013 Critical Analysis of Dillard's "An American Childhood" Throughout "An American Childhood", Dillard shares with us her childhood experiences with her dear mother. Dillard's admiration for her mother is clearly visible through the way she explains in depth all of the memorable situations and events. Dillard explains how intelligent her mother was and how she always played mind games with her and her sister. The characteristic...
    748 Words | 2 Pages
  • An American Childhood - Paper - 712 Words
    An American Childhood An American Childhood, by Annie Dillard, is a happy memoir of Annie's own life, a child of a well-to-do Pittsburgh family. The activities she had as a child, such as piano lessons and dance class, show her family’s wealth. Instead of having to work as a child she shares stories of fun and learning. This is illustrated on page 30, where she is describing the night when her family saw Jo Ann Sheehy skating on the street. As she is talking about how Jo Ann...
    712 Words | 2 Pages
  • Vocabulary: World Book Club
    Vocabulary Notebook INEPT a. "The most inept writing has an inadvertent element of suspense: the reader constantly asks himself, where on earth is this going?)" -How I Wrote the Moth Essay-and Why, Annie Dillard b. having, or showing no skill; displaying a lack of reason. (adj.) c. This word is creating a more accurate description of the type of writing most people use, and demonstrating that there writing has no meaning or skill. d. Sarah tried out for the musical to...
    838 Words | 3 Pages
  • the dogs - 339 Words
    The outdoors contains many wonders that a child explores throughout the early years of life; therefore, a person’s childhood tends to position his path for the future. As a result, occurrences seen on an average day sitting at school, exploring in the woods, or examining the stars have the potential to be life changing. An American Childhood (Dillard), “Two Views of a River” (Twain), and “Listening” (Welty) all allocate this thought, yet the works juxtapose each other with different morals....
    339 Words | 1 Page
  • Gods creation - 324 Words
    God's Creation In Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, Annie Dillard uses her personal experiences to show the relationship between God and nature. By relating everyday events to human ideas, Annie Dillard creates a question: How did we, the universe, come about? Annie Dillard uses a story of a young woman's view of nature to show the pain and beauty of life. Annie Dillard talks of how when she, the character, was a kid the teacher had polyphemus cocoon in a jar. When the moth emerged the jar was so...
    324 Words | 1 Page
  • How to tame a wild tongue
     Meaning of Annie Dillard’s “This is the Life” One of the main points I get from this passage it that most people strive for the same basic goals in life. As she states in paragraph one,”…most cultures prize as ours rightly does, making a contribution by working hard at work at what you love; being in the know, and intelligence; gathering a surplus; and watching; and loving your family above all…” This says most cultures tell their young...
    420 Words | 2 Pages
  • Living Like Weasels - 498 Words
    Payton Dull, Grade 11 “I think it would be well, and proper, and obedient, and pure, to grasp your one necessity and not let it go, to dangle from it limp wherever it takes you. . . Seize it and let it seize you. . .” (Dillard IV). The author Annie Dillard has a purpose in this essay. Her purpose is to explain to us readers how we should live simply. She explains how to find our one purpose in life and focus on only that. Dillard uses certain rhetorical devices such as an ...
    498 Words | 1 Page
  • Death of a moth COMPLETED essay
    Shoshie Koppel Mrs. Morey The Death of a Moth Annie Dillard, in her narrative essay "The Death of a Moth," uses detailed imagery to express her belief that suffering for the sake of a passion will ultimately be rewarded by the achievement of one's goal. The tone she creates is one of solitude and loneliness. Dillard's purpose is to convey the sacrifices that must be made by one who is attempting to pursue their passion. Dillard opens her essay by alluding to the fact that she...
    704 Words | 2 Pages