Alexander II of Russia Essays & Research Papers

Best Alexander II of Russia Essays

  • Alexander II and Alexander III
    The Accomplishments and Failures of the 19th Century Tsars The nineteenth century was filled with a variety of tsars. There are two that deserve a great amount of focus: Alexander II and Alexander III. Alexander II hoped to change and resolve Russia and their social and economic problems. His son, Alexander III, was more conservative and wished to undo everything his father did. Alexander II ascended the throne at the age of thirty-seven. He was tsar of Russia from 1855-1881. Alexander II...
    1,026 Words | 3 Pages
  • Alexander Ii & Alexander Iii
    Alexander II & Alexander III Alexander was the eldest son of Tsar Nicholas I and was born in Moscow in 1818. Alexander became Tsar of Russia in 1855 after his father's death. At that time Russia was in the Crimean War but then in 1856 russia signed the Treaty of Paris that put an end to the war. Alexander knew that his military power wasn't strong enough anymore and his advisers informed him that Russia's economy is not even close enough to be competed with industrialized nations such as...
    586 Words | 2 Pages
  • Alexander II: Managing the Challenge of Modernizing Russia
    How successful did Alexander II manage the challenge of modernising Russia Since the nineteenth century it has been evident that Russia and much of Eastern Europe has struggled to keep up with the modernising western powers; a problem which has become apparent to Alexander II. They were socially, economically and politically behind in many aspects; industrialising was a huge problem due to problems with serfdom as well as poor infrastructure and transport links which made industrialising...
    1,366 Words | 4 Pages
  • Alexander II vs Alexander III
    Compare and contrast the domestic policies of Alexander II and Alexander III Alexander II and his successor and son, Alexander III, inherited Russia in different states and degrees of turmoil. Due to these pressures, both were required to make alterations to the systems in place, such as that of politics and economics. However the natures of their crisis were different and therefore the subsequent modifications varied and were, in many cases, controversial. Alexander II came to power in...
    752 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Alexander II of Russia Essays

  • Alexander Ii Summary 2
    For what reasons and with what results did Alexander II try to reform Russian institutions? The ascension of Alexander II coincided with Russia’s defeat at the hands of the British and French in the Crimean War. The defeat had exposed Russia’s weakness and backwardness in comparison with more advanced nations like Britain and France. This prompted Alexander to embark on a series of reforms to “modernize” Russia. This essay will identify the causes and consequences of this period of reform....
    540 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tsar Alexander Ii - 1164 Words
    Question: “His measures of reform did not disguise his belief in the need to maintain autocratic rule.” To what extent do you agree with this point of view? Tsar Alexander II had many reforms. He was an autocratic ruler who began his reforms in Russia in 1855. Some claim that his reforms were proof of his liberal attitude and others argue that he was primarily a traditionalist, this essay will explore to what extent both of arguments are accurate depictions of “The last great tsar.” When...
    1,164 Words | 3 Pages
  • Alexander Ii and Reform - 721 Words
    Alexander II was known as a reforming czar. Was he primarily a reformer? Alexander II executed many reforms during his time in power but did he reform for the sake of reforming? In the essay I will conclude whether or not Alexander had objectives in which reforming only partook as a secondary effect, and if so, what “was” he primarily? From a political point of view the landlords most likely opposed the peasant liberation reform in 1861 (Berghorn, 2009) which affected the Russian...
    721 Words | 2 Pages
  • Alexander II and the Emancipation of the Serfs
    For what reasons, and with what effects, did the Tsar Alexander II Emancipate the Serfs? “The existing condition of owning souls cannot remain unchanged. It is better to begin to destroy serfdom from above than to wait until that time when it begins to destroy itself from below” After the defeat in the Crimean war Alexander II knew that he had to make new choices if he wanted Russia to get its reputation back, since it had lost its great martial power, which the country took pride...
    1,083 Words | 3 Pages
  • Alexander Ii- a True Reformist?
    Ebba Henningsson 2/09/2010 History Why and with what success did Alexander II impose so many reforms? Alexander II (1818-1881) has on several occasions been referred to as “Alexander the Liberator” due to the emancipation of the serfs, which was one of the many reforms he imposed during his reign as Tsar of Russia. The emancipation, along with the reform of the military, the installation of a judicial system, an educational reform, combined with his other “smaller” reforms, are all...
    1,304 Words | 4 Pages
  • Alexander Ii: Liberator or Traditionalist?
    Alexander II: Liberator or Traditionalist? During the Tsarist reign of Alexander II (1855 – 1881), Alexander implemented a number of reforms that were destined to change the Russian social system. These reforms were the result of Russia’s humiliating military defeat in the Crimean war, as it awakened Alexander to the need for far reaching reforms in order to bring Russia up-to-date with the rest of Europe. However as these reforms were implemented a number of social and political issues arose...
    542 Words | 2 Pages
  • To what extent did Alexander II succeed in his attempts to modernize Russia?
    Paschalis Kitsikopoulos _TO WHAT EXTENT DID ALEXANDER II SUCCEED IN HIS ATTEMPTS TO MODERNIZE RUSSIA?_ In 1855, European countries had to deal with many difficulties. By that time, a major imbalance was existing in and between all countries. A detonation of economy and technology was disturbing even the biggest nations of Europe. All countries were intimidated by the greatest power of the time, Japan and India. Russia was an enormous country, however, it wasn't very advanced as far as the...
    911 Words | 3 Pages
  • Compare and contrast Alexander II and Alexander III
    Compare and contrast Alexander II and Alexander III Although they were father and son, the reigns of Alexander II and Alexander III took off in completely different directions. Alexander II was committed to his empire by vowing to reform Russia, making it more in line with nineteenth-century western society. His son, on the other hand, was the unprepared tsar, whose actions were literally reactions to his father’s unexpected assassination. Consequently, Alexander II went down in history as...
    1,135 Words | 3 Pages
  • Impact of Alexander II's Reign in Russia
    1. “What happened in Russia during the reign of Alexander II (1855-1881) was more of a revolution than many that went by that name elsewhere.” To what extent do you agree with the assertion that Alexander’s policies were revolutionary? Alexander II felt that reforms were needed in Russia as Russia was weak in its military, industrialization, and as well the fear of peasants to revolt. Through his policies, mainly the Emancipation Act of 1861, Alexander II was known to become “Tsar Liberator”....
    1,123 Words | 3 Pages
  • alexander - 784 Words
    Alexander III, Tsar of Russia, 1881-1889 Alexander III of Russia was born on 26th February 1845. Clumsy and gruff as a child, he grew up to be a man of great physical strength. Everything about him suggested imperial power. He was six feet four inches tall, broad and very strong. Stories circulated about Tsar Alexander bending (and then restraightening) iron fire pokers, crushing silver roubles in his fingers, and tearing packs of cards in half for the entertainment of his children, and...
    784 Words | 3 Pages
  • To what extent did the reforms undertaken by Alexander II bring about political, social and economic improvements in Russia.
    To what extent did the reforms undertaken by Alexander II bring about political, social and economic improvements in Russia. Introduction: When and why did Alexander II carry out reform? Scope of reform and praise earned by the Czar: Czar Liberator, enlightened Czar. Reforms: 1. The most notable – Emancipation of Serfdom – improvement aimed at and actual result social effects – serfs became liberated farmers, more willing to work hard, yields would increase, freedom of labour mobility...
    513 Words | 2 Pages
  • In What Ways and with What Successes Did Alexander Ii Attempt to Modernise Russia and Preserve Imperial Power?
    Alexander II came to the throne in March 1855 at the age of 36, having been well prepared and trained to take over from his father, Nicholas I. Due to his father's wishes on his death bed Alexander was committed to retaining the autocratic powers of the tsardom. However he was less of a disciplinarian than his father and was more open to the arguments of the other people around him. He was deeply influenced by defeat in Crimean war and by liberal ministers, Alexander II undertook extensive...
    961 Words | 3 Pages
  • Fhow Far Did Russia Experience a Period of “Reaction” Following the Assassination of Alexander Ii?
    How far did Russia experience a period of “reaction” following the assassination of Alexander II? On 13 March 1881, Tsar Alexander II was assassinated by the populist terrorist group the “People’s Will”, due to the reforms he had created, although he was on the way to give Russia its first national assembly before his death. Therefore his son Alexander III became Tsar in place of his deceased father. Immediately, Alexander III turned his back on all the reforms created by his father, and he...
    1,587 Words | 4 Pages
  • To What Extent Can Alexander II Be Cred
    To what extent can Alexander II be credited with the label ‘Tsar Liberator’? Alexander II succeeded his Father, Nicholas I after his death in 1855. As Alexander was at the mature age of 36, he was viewed as a very experienced statesman with a broad and thorough education which had reared him from the throne. Alexander II’s reign did not start as promising as one would have hoped, with his inheritance of the bloody and draining Crimean War, which eventually ended in 1856 with the Treaty of...
    1,173 Words | 3 Pages
  • “Considering the difficulties he inherited, Alexander II of Russia should be praised not criticised for his reforms.” To what extent do you agree with this judgement?
    History Essay “Considering the difficulties he inherited, Alexander II of Russia should be praised not criticised for his reforms.” To what extent do you agree with this judgement? After the death of Nicolas I, the Tsar’s heir, Alexander II, rose to power in 1855 and led Russia to an era of changes. Considering the difficulties he inherited, Alexander II should be praised and not criticised for his social, judiciary, and military reforms as he successfully abolished serfdom overnight,...
    790 Words | 3 Pages
  • How successful was Alexander II in dealing with opposition to his regime?
    How successful was Alexander II in dealing with opposition to his regime? Judging by the fact that Alexander was assassinated in 1881 by People’s Will, one would assume that he failed – completely- to overcome opposition to his regime, however he ruled for over 25 years and managed to keep his opposition under control during that time using several different methods and measures which will be discussed in this essay. The first measure he took shortly after he came to power was to emancipate the...
    722 Words | 2 Pages
  • To What Extent Does Tsar Alexander Ii Deserve the Title “Tsar Liberator”?
    TO WHAT EXTENT DOES TSAR ALEXANDER II DESERVE THE TITLE “TSAR LIBERATOR”? Tsar of Russia from 1818 to 1881. Son of Nicholas I ascended the throne in 1855. Signed in Paris (1856) the peace that ended the Crimean War began the construction of a vast program of reforms. Open to ideas of social renewal, emancipated the serfs (1861) without satisfy the peasantry, which was granted in usufruct, with a strong payment of ransom, only a portion of the lands they occupied. Instituted the Zemstvo,...
    1,290 Words | 4 Pages
  • To What Extent Did Alexander Ii Deserve His Title of the “Tsar Liberator?”
    Does Alexander II truly deserve the title of liberator? To liberate is to set free (a group or individual) from legal, social or political restrictions. There is evidence to suggest that he disliked serfdom. Even his father, Nicholas I, believed that serfdom was an “evil palpable to all,” and Alexander II was certainly even more liberally educated than his father. His arguably most fundamental reform was the emancipation of serfdom in 1861. As he said, “It is best to abolish serfdom from...
    1,724 Words | 5 Pages
  • Alexander the Third - 1338 Words
    Traditionally it is assumed that he was a reactionary, unlike the reformer his father, Alexander II, had been. However, as so often the case, this interpretation of Alexander III’s rule is undisputed. There is much reason to believe that despite some different policies, ultimately both men wanted to reach the same goals. Alexander III unquestionably did undermine the reforming policies of his father, but the underlying reasons for this are not so obvious. “The reign of Alexander II, which began...
    1,338 Words | 4 Pages
  • Russia and Japan - 1271 Words
    During the nineteenth century, Western Europe went through a marvelous era of industrialization and imperialism. This period of social, political, and territorial advancement caused a dramatic ripple-effect around the world, giving other countries such as Russia and Japan motivation to modernize. By 1914 Russia and Japan had managed to launch significant programs of industrialization and to make other changes designed to strengthen their political and social systems. These two nations defied the...
    1,271 Words | 4 Pages
  • Alexander Iii Was the Ruler Who Did Most to Transform Russia in the Period 1855 to 1914
    Alexander III was the ruler who did the most to transform Russia in the period 1855 to 1914. How far do you agree? There are three Tsars that had many ideas and plan to transform Russia in the period 1855 to 1914. Alexander II, Alexander III and Nicholas II all made reforms to transform and modernise Russia so that it economy was up to date with the rest of Europe. When Alexander II came into power Russia had become involved in the Crimean War, a conflict fought primarily in the Crimean...
    566 Words | 2 Pages
  • How effectively did Nicholas II deal with the problems facing Russia in the period 1894 – 1905?
    How effectively did Nicholas II deal with the problems facing Russia in the period 1894 – 1905? It is one of the ironies of Russian history that, at a time when the nation most needed a tsar of strength and imagination, it was a man of weakness and limited outlook who came to the throne. Nicholas II was the eldest son of Tsar Alexander III. When he succeeded his father in 1894, he had very little experience of government. There are two main aspects to Nicholas’ II’s reign; firstly the problems...
    821 Words | 3 Pages
  • To what extent and why does Alexander II (1855-81) deserve the title Tsar Liberator?
    The debate on whether Alexander II was a Tsar Liberator is one which divides the opinion of many historians who examine Russian history. Alexander II introduced many reforms during his reign which revolutionised the political, social and economic landscape of Russia and were considered by many as ‘liberating’. My definition of ‘to liberate’ is to set free, either from oppression, confinement or indeed foreign control. Did Tsar Alexander do this and to what extent? The Emancipation of Serfs in...
    1,695 Words | 5 Pages
  • What problems did Alexander II face in 1855 and how far was he successful in solving them?
    In 1855, when Alexander II, son of Nicholas I, came to power as Tsar of Russia he was faced by many problems. Russia, being the backwards place it was needed reform. The gap between the noble class and the peasant class was enormous and causing problems. The serfs were being treated horribly; the legal system and educational system were in desperate need of changes. There were also governmental issues that needed to be addressed. Russia could use as much reform as possible; Alexander II saw...
    1,071 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1850 - 1900 Britain and Russia
    “Make a comparison of Russia and Britain in the period 1850 – 1900. How true is it to say that Russia was a ‘backward country’?” Countries develop at different rates at different times. While Britain had started to industrialise and modernise prior to 1850, is it true to say that Russia was as successful in trying to develop before the start of the 20th century or were they still considered a backward country by that time? Prior to and during the period 1850 - 1900, Russia was controlled by...
    1,916 Words | 5 Pages
  • Russia - Change or Continiuity - 1188 Words
    Amy Stirling Russia Essay - High Grade C , nearly B - use for revision There was more change than continuity in the ways in which Russia was ruled in the period 1855 to 1964? To what extent do you agree with this view? While in theory , the manner in which Russia was ruled undertook a considerable overhaul following the 1917 revolution . In reality the Country was governed with the Tsar and general security remaining as the ultimate authority with no real development occurring. Methods of...
    1,188 Words | 3 Pages
  • russia revision guide - 7465 Words
     Russia possible essay questions: Collapse Reform and reaction, 1855–1881 Why did Alexander II order the emancipation of the serfs in 1861? (12 marks) Crimean War defeat His own beliefs Political considerations Why did defeat in the Crimean War lead to reform under Alexander II? (12 marks) Inadequate army training suggested Russia was not an “elite state” Social unrest caused by the defeat Pressure from intellectuals Explain why Alexander II introduced further reforms following the...
    7,465 Words | 24 Pages
  • Russia 19th Century - 766 Words
    Russia in the nineteenth century Government & Society: * Autocracy (a system of government with one person with total power) was a system that was on going in 19th century Russia. It was led by the Tsar. * Beneath the Tsar were The Court, who were leading landowners and members of the government. * Below them were a small group of businessmen and traders. * The majority of the population were Serfs who were servants attached to land owned by a lord. They were required to...
    766 Words | 3 Pages
  • Russia Before 1881 - 773 Words
    History Russia before 1881 The rulers of Russia before 1855 were regarded as reactionary autocrats, unwilling to consider any political or social change. The rulers in Russia: 1855-1881 Tsar Alexander II Absolute Monarchy 1881-1894 Tsar Alexander III Tsar Alexander II received the title ‘Tsar Liberator” because he instituted important liberal changes such as the emancipation of...
    773 Words | 3 Pages
  • To What Extent Did Alexander 3 React to the Reforms of Alexander 2?
    To what extent did Alexander 3 react to the reforms of Alexander 2? The term "reaction" refers to a backward change and the term "reform" means to overhul the situation and change it, most of the time for the better. Alexander II also known as the liberator, was the Emperor of Russia from 1855 to 1881. He was responsible for reforms of the legal system, local goverment, armed forces and the emancipation of the serfs, which was the the most important reform in 1861. When Alexander the...
    1,235 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Reactionary Policies of Tsar Alexander III
    How successful were the reactionary policies of Tsar Alexander III? Tsar Alexander’s reign (1881-1894) has been known as a period of extreme repression. He turned his back on reform all together and instituted a series of predictable repressive measures that collectively known as “The Reaction”. There were numerous reactionary policies brought in by the new and unexpected Tsar, one of which was known as Russification. This particular policy was brought in in 1881 at the very beginning of the...
    1,732 Words | 5 Pages
  • Changes and Continuities in Labor Systems in Russia
    ------------------------------------------------- Changes and Continuities in labor systems in Russia Between 1750 and 1914, England, Germany, and Western Europe were all expanding. England was gaining land and trust in the Middle East, Germany was becoming an established nation, and Western Europe was thriving due to the Industrial Revolution. After recognizing all of this, Russia decided it was time for reform or be left in the dust. This caused major changes in Russia’s labor system such...
    565 Words | 2 Pages
  • Late Imperial Russia, 1890-1917
    Late imperial Russia 1890-1917: how was Russia set up to be the nation it is today? Introduction: ‘Imperial Russia’ all started in the 17th century where a man named Tsar Ivan IV ‘the terrible’ battled and defeated the Mongols which were the previous rulers of Russia. He appointed himself the emperor of Russia and his heirs would carry on his principles and his way of ruling throughout the century’s to build a strong nation. The Tsars of the Romanov dynasty would carry on ruling till the last...
    2,350 Words | 6 Pages
  • Modernization Movements in Russia After 1854
    Modernization Movements in Russia After 1854 Step One Most people will agree that modernization in Russia started in the year 1854. But, before looking at these movements we must first look at the motivation and background of modernization. There are several theories on why the Russian state finally decided to reform. Some historians believe that there was a surge of "liberal humanitarian ideas within the higher ranks of state and society" (Freeze 170); these of course being Western...
    840 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tsar Nicholas II and Problems He Faced
     HISTORY ESSAY: How serious were the problems facing the Tsar, Nicholas II from 1894-1905? Alongside the other serious problems the Tsar encountered, one main concerning battle was with himself, which many concurred with by the end of 1905. Nicholas II fell into the notion that the throne was reserved for him by the will of god, thus thought he didn’t have to take measures to politically modernise, and establish Russia in general. This deluded perception brought about many serious problems...
    843 Words | 3 Pages
  • Measuring the Success of Alexander III in Tackling the Problems of the Tsarist Regime
    How successful was Alexander III in tackling the problems of the Tsarist regime? Tsar Alexander III was forced onto the throne after his father’s assassination in 1881. He had fears of maybe having the same fate of his father, therefore leading onto him making changes to the Tsarist regime bringing it back to a doctoral style of government. Alexander wanted to ensure that all power was again entrusted to the Tsar and to do this he had to restrict the zemstva’s power as the zemstva meant the...
    586 Words | 2 Pages
  • to what extent was Alexander successful in tackling the problems of the tsarist regime?
    To what extent was Alexander successful in tackling the problems of the tsarist regime? When Alexander III became the tsar, Russia was in a crisis following the assassination of Alexander II. The problems that Tsar was facing were that many different groups wanted to change the political system, as not everyone agreed with the autocracy system of government in Russia. To solve this he had to get rid of all political parties and political opposition. Also he had to get rid of anyone who had or...
    2,108 Words | 6 Pages
  • War was an important cause of change in Russia during the period 1855
    To what extent did war act as a catalyst for change in Russia between 1855 and 1924 War was an important cause of change in Russia during the period 1855-1924 and arguably was the most important cause but it was certainly not the only one. Other factors such as the influence of key individuals played a great part in determining change in Russia and should be considered to be very important as well. Russia had been heavily defeated in the Crimean war and this consequently was the most important...
    1,389 Words | 4 Pages
  • How far was Russia a modern industrialised state by 1904? (24 marks)
    How far was Russia a modern industrialised state by 1904? (24 marks) Despite the relatively successful industrial reforms implemented by Vyshnegradsky and Witte, Russia was by no means a modern nation. By 1904 Alexander III had taken back any political concessions that had been given and the Zemstva was a tool of the nobles who controlled the monopoly on voting. Russian technology was decades behind the west, Russia was the last of the ‘great powers’ to industrialise thus found it difficult to...
    761 Words | 2 Pages
  • how successful were Alexander reforms in transforming the russian soicety
    How successful were Alexander reforms in transforming Russian Society by 1881? 24 marks Alexander came to power in 1855, but before he became Tsar Alexander witnessed the shameful defeat against Britain, France and Turkey in the Crimean War in 1854 This had given him the opportunity to observe some of the problems which Russia faced; Alexander believed that changes had to be made towards modernisation. The population of the Russian Empire was 74...
    959 Words | 3 Pages
  • Who Was The Most Successful Russia Leader Between 1855
    Who was the most successful Russia leader between 1855 - 1964? There were six leaders between the time period 1855-1064 and to determine who was the most successful we have to know how to measure successfulness. Successfulness is measured over a range of things such as achieving aims, economy, war and the public opinion and opposition to the leader in power. Firstly war was a crucial part of the time period 1855-1964 with Russia going though small wars to huge full blown World Wars. Stalin was...
    2,562 Words | 6 Pages
  • How well did Alexander III deal with the problems that he faced
    How well did Alexander III deal with the problems that he faced? Unlike his father, Alexander III did manage to survive his reign relatively unscathed, which indicates that he dealt with his problems well, at least in the short term. Alexander III inherited a country fraught with economic difficulties, violent extremists and social tensions. His priority was to maintain his autocratic power and restore the power and influence of the nobility – his most trusted support base. Although he...
    1,197 Words | 3 Pages
  • Before 1905 the opposition to the government of Tsar Nicholas II was of no consequence
    The Tsar was not in serious Jeopardy in 1905 Throughout his time as Tsar, Nicholas II was faced with constant threats due to terrorist groups such as the peoples will. Many of these groups were oppressed by ‘The reaction’ that began under the reign of Alexander III, however not all opposition was destroyed. This meant that Nicholas was in constant Jeopardy. This essay will discuss whether or not Tsar Nicholas II was truly in serious Jeopardy during the events of 1905. The Russian revolution...
    795 Words | 2 Pages
  • Explain why Alexander II's policies became more reactionary after 1866 (12 marks)
    Tsarist Russia: Reform and Reaction 1855 - 81 Q. Explain why Alexander II’s policies became more reactionary after 1866 (12 marks) The year of 1866 can be seen to have been a turning point in the Tsar’s policies becoming more reactionary and reversing many of the changes his reforms had brought. The reforms had been put in place in an attempt to propel Russia out of its increasingly backward state; as much as reforms such as the emancipation of the serfs, greater freedoms and opportunities in...
    681 Words | 2 Pages
  • To what extend was Alexander III’s reign a failed reaction to the reign of his father?
     Alexander III was the second son of Alexander II and thus had not been prepared or educated to take over the throne. When his older brother, however died in 1865 and at the age of 36 he became the heir to Tsardom. His father, Alexander II, had appointed the conservative Konstantin Pobodonestev as his tutor, who to a certain extend influenced and shaped the conservative thoughts of Alexander III from early age. Alexander blamed his father's death on the reforms he had made earlier in his...
    755 Words | 2 Pages
  • How far do you agree that Alexander III’s reign deserves the title “The reaction”?
    How far do you agree that Alexander III’s reign deserves the title “The reaction”? The term “reaction” refers to the idea of opposition to the ideals of reform; it refers to the idea of a backwards change, usually a change towards more traditional views and in the case of Alexander III it can be argued to whether his reign was completely reactionary or reformist or to whether only some parts where. When Alexander III took the position of Tsar from his father in 1881; his father Alexander II...
    1,521 Words | 4 Pages
  • Which of the previous Tsars were most to blame for the problems inherited by Nicholas II when he ascended to the throne in 1894?
    Which of the previous Tsars were most to blame for the problems inherited by Nicholas II when he ascended to the throne in 1894? When Nicholas II ascended the throne in 1894 he wasn’t facing any single issue left by a single Tsar he was facing the culmination of the three previous rulers’ mistakes that they had left behind or inherited and made worse. However the biggest problems had arguably been left by Russia’s most “liberal” Tsar, Alexander I. Nicholas I faced a multitude of...
    953 Words | 3 Pages
  • Assess the View That the Tsars Preferred Repression to Reform in the Period 1855 to 1906
    Assess the view that the Tsars preferred repression to reform in the period 1855 to 1906 While the reforms between 1855 and 1906 strongly suggest the Tsars preferring a policy of reform rather than repression, the unexpected consequences of many if not all of the reforms lead to repressive policies. Tsar Alexander II in particular, was very determined to modernize Russia but was not prepared for the liberal and democracy encouraging consequences and thus felt the need to counter reform. This...
    2,567 Words | 7 Pages
  • How far were divisions among its opponents responsible for the survival of Tsarist rule in the years 1881–1905?
    Indicative content Mark The question is focused on the challenges mounted to Tsarist rule in the given period, and the extent to which divisions among opposition groups contributed to their failure. Answers may consider the four main strands of opposition, their internal divisions and their intolerance of each other. A tradition of revolutionary activity was established by the Populists and their appeal to the peasants, though they were weakened by the assassination of Alexander II and the...
    555 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Kitchen Boy Book Critique
    THE KITCHEN BOY One of the greatest mysteries in Russian history is the murder of the last royal family of the Romanov dynasty. Although there is much speculation as to what happened that grisly night, some details still remain unclear, and could only be verified by a witness to the tragic events. In the novel, The Kitchen Boy, author Robert Alexander offers a fictional tale that does just that. Through the perspective of the main character Misha, the reader is taken back in time to the early...
    1,895 Words | 5 Pages
  • Ap Stearns Chapter 27 Outline
    Name: ____________________________ Date: ________________ Block:______ Chapter 27: Russia and Japan: Industrialization Outside the West I. Introduction A. Russia and Japan defied the pattern of growing Western domination during the19th century 1. By 1914, both launched significant______________________ and accomplished other changes that preserved their ___________________ 2. Both achieved economic autonomy and were able to join in ___________________________ B. Differences between...
    2,239 Words | 10 Pages
  • Russian Intelligentsia of Mid-1800s and Its Political Impacts
    Why and how was a Russian Intelligentsia cultivated in the mid-1800’s and what were their political impacts? BRANGLIDOR Raphaël Gabvin IBS of Provence Candidate Number: 001386-041 Word count: 3900 Topic: Emergence and Impact of the Russian Intelligentsia Category: History Table of Contents Sub-heading | Page Number | Table of Contents | Page 1 | Abstract | Page 2 | Introduction | Page 3 | Definition and background | Page 4 |...
    4,398 Words | 13 Pages
  • What - 383 Words
    Change and Continuity Over Time Essay Topic: Analyze the changes and continuities in labor systems between 1750 and 1914 in RUSSIA. Beginning Middle End |1750-1860 |1860-1914 |1900-1914 | |1762-1796: Catherine II the Great...
    383 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Conservative Ruler - 391 Words
    Alexander III 1. Give reasons to explain why Alexander III was known as being conservative One of the main reasons why his father was killed was because he had made to many reforms, thus, the son, Alexander III decided to be the opposite of his father, a conservative ruler. 2. How did the new government respond to the People’s Will and other political opposition groups? The government began a hunt for any member of the People’s will, and it had executed 5 members whom have been at the centre...
    391 Words | 2 Pages
  • To What Extent Do You Consider the Emancipation of Serfs 1861 to Be a Key Turning Point in the Development of Russian Government and Society Till 2000?
    Essay Question: To what extent do you consider the Emancipation of Serfs 1861 to be a key turning point in the development of Russian government and society till 2000? Many historians argue The Emancipation of the Serfs in 1861, to be a key turning point within Russian history. It drastically altered Russia’s economic, political and social stipulation. One could propose the argument that this event lead to the fall of communism in 1990, further more suggesting the extent to which this event...
    1,456 Words | 4 Pages
  • Short term significance of emancipation act
    Russia. March 3rd 1861. Society is becoming restless and demanding change in system. Tsar Alexander II gives the people the ​ Emancipation​ of the serfs which states that peasants will no longer be possessed by the Nobles. What is considered significant is how society reacted in the following decades to the 1861 Act. The edict effect both sides society which in turn, resulted in action against government. The Gentry and Peasantry both suffered socioeconomic problems. This lead to the greatest...
    2,024 Words | 6 Pages
  • Superstitions: Superstition and Delicious Grape Breath
     Superstitions A superstition is a belief in something that is irrational, non-physical and does not follow the rules of science. It is often one action that leads to another without something directly linking the two. Superstition is often associated with luck. Different superstitions often came from beliefs, religions and cultures had in the past and long have been proven wrong. It is a mystery why people don't pay attention to facts and still believe in superstitions. In...
    457 Words | 2 Pages
  • How accurate is it to say that the growth of reformist groups in the years from 1881 was the main cause of the 1905 revolution?
    How accurate is it to say that the growth of reformist groups in the years from 1881 was the main cause of the 1905 revolution? In some ways it is accurate to say that the growth of reformist groups in the years from 1881 was a significant cause of the 1905 revolution because they stirred up discontent amongst industrial workers and peasants. The social revolutionaries’ party was formed from ‘the peoples will’. These were a radical party that came around in the 1860’s. They split from the...
    1,474 Words | 4 Pages
  • To What Extent Was the Tsarist System of Government Modified in the Years 1881-1914?
    The reign of Alexander III (1881-1894) showed the Tsarist system of government with little modification. Alexander III was a conservative who believed in autocratic power of the Tsar. He openly stated his belief in the "power and right of autocratic government". During his reign, Tsarist tyranny reached its high-water mark. The autocratic policy and reforms brought about much discontent in the country with no modernisation what so ever, his main focus on maintaining autocratic rule. His policy...
    461 Words | 2 Pages
  • History 101 Extra Credit Assignment
    History 101 Extra Credit Assignment 1. First Opium War 1839-42 The First Anglo-Chinese War known popularly as the First Opium War was fought between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the Qing Dynasty of China, with the aim of securing economic benefits from trade in China. In 1842, the Treaty of Nanking the first of what the Chinese called the unequal treaties granted an indemnity to Britain, the opening of five treaty ports, and the cession of Hong Kong Island, ending the...
    714 Words | 3 Pages
  • Chapter 27 Study Guide
    Chapter 27 Study Guide 1. The process of industrialism threatened traditional and social hierarchies in both societies. In Russia, the aristocracy was threatened by the abolition of serfdom, the creation of regional zemstvoes, and reforms of the army. In Japan, the samurai were almost destroyed by the fall of the shogunate, the destruction of feudalism, and military reform. Both nations used territorial expansion as a means of mollifying the aristocracy and building support for the imperial...
    921 Words | 3 Pages
  • Russian Timeline of Events Leading Up to the Revolution on 1917
    |1855 |Start of reign of Tsar Alexander II. | |1861 |Emancipation of the serfs. | |1874–81 |Growing anti-government terrorist movement and government reaction. | |1881 |Alexander II assassinated by revolutionaries; succeeded...
    591 Words | 3 Pages
  • The positive and negative effects of Russian Industrialization
    Industrialization has been a key factor in the development of nations worldwide. Like every movement, industrialization is followed by both positive and negative effects. The industrialization of Russia was no exception to this theory. In 1861, under the rule of Alexander II, Russia moved into an active period of social and political reform that established the base for industrialization. It wasn't until the 1890's that Russia finally entered the industrial age. This was due, in part, to the...
    519 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Far Were Divisions Amongst Opponents Responsible for the Survival of Tsarist Rule, 1881 - 1905?
    How far were divisions amongst opponents responsible for the survival of Tsarist rule, 1881 - 1905? Divisions of opposing groups of the Tsar were important to the survival of Tsarist Russia. However, other factors such as the church, the belief of the divine right, the army and the Okhrana were also effective in keeping the Tsar in a state of power. Firstly, the opposition groups of the Tsar were known as the Populists, the Liberals and the Marxists. Each group had its own ideas on what was...
    800 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ap Euro Late 19th Century Important Figures
    Important Nineteenth Century Guys Charts Note: Legacies are gone into detail in the charts Tsar Alexander II Positives | Negatives | * Introduced emancipation edict, gave the right to peasants to own land, marry their own choice, bring suits to court. * Peasants were given their own land. * Zemstvos (local assemblies) were put in place by Alexander, they could levy taxes and took charge over matters of education, famine, public projects * Local and provincial courts were made....
    708 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1905 Revolution - Essay - 2086 Words
    Assess the reason for the 1905 revolution in Russia. The turn of the 19th century brought together a series of events, discontent and public tension together to form the 1905 revolution, which eventually brought an established autocratic Tsarist regime to an end. But previously, Russia was in turmoil. With a land mass of over 8 million square miles entailing over 100 ethnic races; limited communication organization and transport which was often impassable leaving sections of Russia detached...
    2,086 Words | 6 Pages
  • Tsar Nicholas - 8608 Words
    Economically Alexander II drew up plans for a massive investment in railways - (put in place under Alexander III). The emancipation, he hoped, would lead to greater agricultural output, in order to finance the railways, and the beginnings of Russia's industrialisation. He also invested in new iron and steel works - for armaments, new textiles factories - for uniforms, and new manufacturing industries - for arms and ammunition. Nicholas continued these policies, and the problems that...
    8,608 Words | 26 Pages
  • Miss - 933 Words
    How successful was Alexander II in overcoming opposition to his regime? In 1861 Russia was a backward state, other countries in Europe had undergone the industrial revolution but Russia was still an agricultural country with a large lower class of serfs. Alexander II made the decision to emancipate the serfs in 1861 mainly due to a fear of revolt but also as a cause of liberal pressure and in the interest of economic growth. Throughout this decision and decisions to make other reforms...
    933 Words | 3 Pages
  • Russian Czars - 1540 Words
    Russian Czars After the three partitions of Poland in 1772, 1793, and 1795, there were many more Jews in the Russian empire. The Pale of Settlement was a region in imperial Russia where the Jews were given permanent dwelling. The leaders of Russia were called Czars and they had complete power over the entire empire. This essay will discuss three Russian Czars, Nicholas I, Alexander II, and Alexander III and the impact they had on the Jews. The different levels of tolerance of these Czars to the...
    1,540 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Emancipation of Serfs in 1861 - 3297 Words
    What are the reasons for the failure of the Emancipation of Serfdom in 1861? Abstract The necessity of reforming society based on serfdom had not been new in XIX century. However the same way, a person with a cancer does not show symptoms of illness in the first stages, the same way it was not apparent that Russia had been economically and industrially “sick” until the defeat in the Crimean War. The most significant reform to remedy Russian backwardness was the Emancipation Edict, followed by...
    3,297 Words | 8 Pages
  • How far were divisions among its opponents responsible for the survival of Tsarist rule in 1881-1905?
    “How far were divisions among its opponents responsible for the survival of Tsarist rule in 1881-1905?” It is apparent that there existed divisions of the parties opposing the Tsarist government, i.e. the Social Democrats became the Bolsheviks and the Mensheviks in 1903; the Social Revolutionaries had many factions including the revolutionaries and the anarchists; and the Liberals didn’t develop individual parties until after 1905. However, the factors of the nobility, the Russian Army, the...
    1,091 Words | 3 Pages
  • How far do the views in the Source A and B differ regarding the benefits of “Working towards the fuhrer”? (12 marks)
    How far did the defeat in the Crimean War contribute to Alexander II as a reformer? (24 marks) Alexander II had come to the throne in 1855, during the closing days of the Crimean war. The war had gone badly for Russia, and this set the tone of Alexander’s reign, but was it just the Crimean war which started the chain of reform? Or was it already existing pressures? The Crimean war had highlighted the inadequacies in the Russian military. An example of this would be the lack of war materiel,...
    1,073 Words | 3 Pages
  • how far were divisions among opponents responsible for survival of Tsarist rule in 1905
    How far were divisions among its opponents responsible for the survival of Tsarist rule in the years 1881-1905? To a certain extent the divisions among the opponents of the Tsar, such as the Bolshevik and Menshevik split in the Marx party after the 1903 conference, or even the divisions among different revolutionary parties entirely, e.g. Marx and the Social Revolutionaries, was responsible for the survival of Tsarist rule in this period as this led to disorganisation and lack of...
    2,563 Words | 7 Pages
  • What Are the Key Factors Which Lead to the Downfall of the Romanov Dynasty?
    What are the Key factors which lead to the downfall of the Romanov Dynasty? To what extent is Tsar Nicholas responsible for his demise? 1917 saw the conclusion of the reign of the Romanov Dynasty, as well as the demise of Russia’s last monarch, Tsar Nicholas II. It is evident that the downfall of the Romanov Dynasty was directly linked to key factors such as the autocratic style of the Romanov dynasty and the nature of the social structure, as well as the evolving nation of Russia, as a...
    2,120 Words | 6 Pages
  • To what extent was the defeat of the Crimean war Alexander’s excuse for change.
    To what extent was the defeat of the Crimean war Alexander’s excuse for change. The defeat in the Crimean war was arguably the main reason why Alexander II made a series of reforms when he came into power. The devastating loss of the war proved the backwardness of Russia in relation to other powers and even though peasant unrest and the criticisms of serfdom were partially responsible for influencing Alexander II, the decision to make changes primarily came from the loss of the Crimean war....
    811 Words | 2 Pages
  • Explain the reasons for the fall of the Romanovs
    Explain the reasons for the fall of the Romanovs The cause of the fall of the Romanov dynasty in 1917 was a result of long-term causes including Tsar Alexander’s inability to satisfy his people and Tsar Nicholas II’s inability to rule to throne all together. The Bloody Sunday event, the war with Germany, Rasputin and Tsars bad decisions was also some of the causes which led the Romanovs to fall. It all began in 1894 when Alexander III, died leaving his son Nicholas II to become the tsar of...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • Living and Working Conditions of Russian Peasants in 1855-1917
    The peasantry in Russia endured many a hardship under tsarist regimes. Suggesting that the living and working conditions of the Russian peasants were consistently miserable would justify that statement. Examples of these hardships were infact their living and working conditions, war and opportunities and freedoms they were entitled to. Working conditions were miserable throughout the period. Before emancipation they would work hard labour for 3 days just to provide for their landowner, this was...
    617 Words | 2 Pages
  • history - 1211 Words
    Name: Andiswa Mlambo Student no:48090239 Unique number: 844868 Assignment : 04 Question 1 The reform of Alexander11 [1855-1881] were meaningless and left tsarist Russia unchanged ; do you agree? Give reasons for your answer. I agree that the reform of Alexander11 [1855-1881] were meaningless and left tsarist Russia unchanged. The disastrous state of affairs left by Nicholas I meant that change had to come to Russia. His son, Alexander II was responsible for introducing major...
    1,211 Words | 4 Pages
  • Refelctive Cherry Orchard - 400 Words
    How was your understanding of cultural and contextual considerations of the work developed through the interactive oral? The play The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov shows the changing times in Russia, particularly the rise of the serfs and the communist ideology. During the discussion, various topics were brought up, including social class, time, characterisation, and the significance of the cherry orchard. The cherry orchard in general represents the wealth of the aristocrats and the old...
    400 Words | 2 Pages
  • Political Opponents of the Tsar and Their Methods and Aims
    How far was political opposition to the Tsar divided in their aims and methods, 1881-1905? Political opponents of the Tsar were clearly divided in their aims and methods, and consequentially may have contributed to the survival of Tsarist Russia. The main parties were the Social democrats (Bolsheviks and Mensheviks), Social Revolutionaries and Liberals (Octobrists and Kadets). Each of these radical parties had their own separate beliefs on what Russia needed and each aimed for some sort of...
    305 Words | 1 Page
  • Hist107 Final Paper - 1995 Words
     THE FALL OF THE ROMANOVS: AN ANALYSIS A Term Paper Submitted to Mr. Sashah B. Dioso In partial fulfilment of the requirements in History 107 (Modern History of Russia) Junauelle Kyla B. Andres Camille May B. Savillo BS Economics IV INTRODUCTION The Romanov dynasty was the last imperial dynasty to rule Russia. The Romanovs ruled Russia for almost three centuries, from 1613 until 1917, the year of its fall during the Bolshevik Revolution. The Romanovs were descendants of the...
    1,995 Words | 6 Pages
  • land of the tsars - 419 Words
    NOTES: The Land of the Tsars Religion: The Orthodox Church was not independent of the state, but was controlled by the Holy Synod, chaired by a government minister. The Tsar, Tsarevich (the Tsar’s son) and their wives all had by law to be members. The tsar had absolute power over Church finance and appointments. The Church supported the government, emphasizing to all in society the important of obedience to authority, whether it was political or religious. How was Russia ruled? By...
    419 Words | 2 Pages