Afghanistan Essays & Research Papers

Best Afghanistan Essays

  • afghanistan - 329 Words
    Afghanistan: Food and Music Vanesa, Janelle and Rebecca Food The changing climate of Afghanistan allows for a variety of crops to grow throughout the seasons. Fresh yogurt, coriander, garlic, onions, spring onion, tomatoes, potatoes, and fruit are widely available in most parts of Afghanistan and are used in preparing foods. Both fresh and dried fruits and vegetables, form an important part of the Afghan diet, especially in the rural areas. Afghanistan produces a variety of exceptional...
    329 Words | 2 Pages
  • Afghanistan - 574 Words
    Afghanistan’s Main religion is Islam, and it’s the main religion in Afghanistan which is practiced by about 90% of the population. Their main tradition is the teaching of their religion. Muslims pray 5- times a day and that’s what they do through their daily lives. They religion of Islam has 5-Pillars: Pray, fast, Give Charity to those in need, go to Hajj (Which is in Saudi Arabia). Muslims should at least go there once in their life and the last one is to give Zakat which is giving 5-10% of the...
    574 Words | 2 Pages
  • Afghanistan - 716 Words
    ASSIGNMENT TOPIC a. War on Terror - Afghanistan b. War ARTICLE TITLE a. War in Afghanistan – Lunch with the Taliban ARTICLE SOURCE a. The Economist. ARTICLE SUMMARY a. This article talks about the state of affairs in Afghanistan. The Taliban is still very much around even though they are not in control of the government. The government is led by President Hamid Karzai, who is said to be very corrupt. There are also the forces of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization),...
    716 Words | 2 Pages
  • Women in Afghanistan - 1627 Words
    Researching the Women in Afghanistan has informed me about the many different aspects that have shaped these women into who they are today. They have survived through incredibly harsh periods when education for women was illegal and when being out in public without a male accompaniment was a punishable act as well. Not only have the women of Afghanistan survived through these terrible times, but they never seemed to give up home schooling girls in their homes and searching for a way to better...
    1,627 Words | 6 Pages
  • All Afghanistan Essays

  • Daughters of Afghanistan - 1269 Words
    Afghanistan is a country where survival is a fight. Poverty, diseases, poor health care, and starvation is an everyday struggle in daily life. If you are an Afghan woman these issues are compounded by the fact that women are seen as being objects. Women are not worth as much as a man. Women in Afghanistan are seen as inferior. Women can be put to death for the slightest insinuation of an insult to a man. These are just a few of the issues that the women and girls of Afghanistan face...
    1,269 Words | 3 Pages
  • Economy of Afghanistan - 512 Words
    Afghanistan Economy Profile 2013 Economy- Afghanistan's economy is recovering from decades of conflict. The economy has improved significantly since the fall of the Taliban regime in 2001 largely because of the infusion of international assistance, the recovery of the agricultural sector, and service sector growth. Despite the progress of the past few years, Afghanistan is extremely poor, landlocked, and highly dependent on foreign aid. Much of the population continues to suffer from...
    512 Words | 4 Pages
  • Corruption in Afghanistan - 3108 Words
    Abstract Corruption in Afghanistan is so prevalent that nearly every part of the population is affected by the damage that it causes. Bribery and nepotism is such a common theme throughout the Afghan culture, that is has essentially become a way of life; corruption is accepted there. Throughout the education system, bribery is effecting the thought process of up and coming generations. With the Afghan National Security Force, citizens of the country are used to paying fabricated “taxes” and...
    3,108 Words | 10 Pages
  • Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan - 934 Words
    Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan By Seth G. Jones RAND Corporation, 2008, 144 pages Reviewed by: Mariely Norris, Student Overview Taking a look at this monograph we can find a close examination of the counterinsurgency operations in Afghanistan followed by the appearance of the Taliban regime in 2001. It is based on repeated trips to Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India from (2004-2008). The author focused on the early stages of the insurgency (2002-2008) and examines how and why it began. The...
    934 Words | 3 Pages
  • Food in Afghanistan - 465 Words
    Food in different countries can be very interesting. There are many different practices and preparations for different styles of food. In Afghanistan, everything is repaired by the woman. This is due to the fact that in their country, women are of a lesser value then men. This is all changing as the country is being reborn after that unfortunate incident involving Asamu Bin Laden. In Afghanistan, Afghans are under Islamic laws and controlled in all aspects of life. Most of them are divided into...
    465 Words | 2 Pages
  • Geography in Afghanistan - 1821 Words
    Geography exists throughout our everyday lives, where we live, where we work, what we eat, and what we believe in. It plays an essential role in understanding why, where, or how something exists. For example, an introduction to geography gives the knowledge of understanding how certain landforms were formed, or why certain bodies of water exist. This further leads to how certain weather patterns form, thus creating different types of biomes and substantial agricultural productions....
    1,821 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Geography of Afghanistan - 4223 Words
    Military Geography Operation Enduring Freedom 2001 Introduction: Afghanistan is a landlocked country that is located approximately in the center of Asia. It is located within Central Asia, and South Asia, and the Middle East. It is bordered by Pakistan in the south and east, Iran in the south and west, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan in the north, and China in the far northeast. The geography of Afghanistan is considered to be extremely important strategically. Afghanistan...
    4,223 Words | 13 Pages
  • Afghanistan Essay - 1063 Words
    Shay Daji Dr. Eren Tasar HIST 190: Special Topics October 8th, 2013 Use of Violence During the Reigns of Amanullah, the Communists, and the Taliban Afghanistan has seen many regime changes in its tumultuous history. Many different leaders with just as many different ideologies have ruled over Afghanistan. Some wanted to keep Afghanistan isolated while others wanted to open the country up to foreign trade and international affairs. Some wanted Afghanistan to stay true to its traditional...
    1,063 Words | 3 Pages
  • Afghanistan Refugees - 1804 Words
    Afghanistan Refugees 1970’s Afghanistan's Refugee Crisis by Hiram Ruiz , Margaret Emery | published September 24, 2001 Over the last two weeks, an estimated 15,000 Afghan refugees have fled to Pakistan, and hundreds of thousands more are reportedly on the move within Afghanistan. This latest flight of Afghans from their homes deepens a humanitarian crisis that has troubled the region for more than 20 years. Already, some 2 million Afghan refugees are living in Pakistan and more than 1.4...
    1,804 Words | 5 Pages
  • The War in Afghanistan - 2017 Words
    The War in Afghanistan A basic overview of the war in Afghanistan After 9/11, President George W. Bush gave the rulers of Afghanistan an ultimatum: hand over the terrorists responsible for 9/11, or “share in their fate.” The Taliban—the Islamic fundamentalists who ruled the country—refused to surrender their ally, terrorist leader Osama bin-Laden. Air strikes began on 10/7/01, less than a month after 9/11. American, British and other soldiers fought together with Afghans opposed to the...
    2,017 Words | 6 Pages
  • Carpet Afghanistan - 3538 Words
    Investing in Afghanistan Business opportunities in the carpet industry The tradition of Afghan carpets goes back for centuries. The richness and variety of designs reflect the cultural diversity of our country. The skill of our weavers is unrivalled in the world and make our carpets unique. Rightfully, our weavers take great pride in being part of this living heritage of our country. Commercially, the carpet industry is a cornerstone of our economy. It is our leading export sector, it...
    3,538 Words | 10 Pages
  • Education in Afghanistan - 361 Words
    Education in Afghanistan Before the Taliban Public education is relatively recent concept in Afghanistan. It wasn't until 1969 that the Afghan government legislated free, mandatory education for children between the ages of 7 and 15. Before 1969, schools existed, but whether or not a child attended school was completely up to his or her family. Some families thought that education was important and made sacrifices to secure their children’s education However, the provision of schools,...
    361 Words | 2 Pages
  • Women in Afghanistan - 1202 Words
    In the Afghan world today, especially in Kabul, the Taliban government has a strong and terrible influence on everyone living there. The Taliban are a Muslim fundamentalist group that took control over the government from 1996 until 2001. They enforced many unrealistic rules that caused many hardships for men and women. Many countries have stepped in to try bringing peace to Afghanistan. The Taliban had control of over 90% of the population until countries came together to stop them. They now,...
    1,202 Words | 3 Pages
  • Taliban in Afghanistan - 2196 Words
    1)Afghanistan was once a place of relative peace. A place where one could do as they please and have the freedoms to be who they wanted to be. But a few years would change that all. Everything that the citizens of Afghanistan knew, their entire way of life would change. The cause? The Taliban. The Taliban are an extremist Muslim group from Afghanistan. The Taliban, who call themselves Jihad or “freedom fighters” are the most brutal extremist Muslims in the world. To understand the Taliban you...
    2,196 Words | 5 Pages
  • Oppression in Afghanistan - 1281 Words
    Green English IV AP 14 November 2012 Oppression in Afghanistan In Hosseini’s second novel, A Thousand Splendid Suns, he explores the oppression of women in Afghanistan during the rise of the Taliban through three women; Nana, Mariam and Laila. Women in Afghanistan are known to face far different and difficult situations in comparison to the treatment of women in the western part of the world. The rise of the Taliban has recently deprived most of Afghanistan’s women of many human and individual...
    1,281 Words | 3 Pages
  • Buzkashi In Afghanistan - 1151 Words
    Chapter 3 The Buzkashi Tooi The book “Buzkashi” Game in Power in Afghanistan is written by G. Whitney Azoy is introducing the Buzkashi game in Afghanistan in details, but in the third chapter of this book which is about the the Buzkashi Tooi, he describes that how this game is held in the local places. First he explains the word Tooi, rite of passage, and marriage. Then he argues that the buzkashi tooi is a Khan’s activities. According to him, Khans are those who have some kind of...
    1,151 Words | 3 Pages
  • Afghanistan Conflict - 3557 Words
    How does the natural and human environment impact on conflict and how does conflict impact on people and their environment? Where is the Afghan War located? It is situated below the Brandt line (running through the middle of the earth) in south central Asia. It is bordered by Iran on the west, by Pakistan on the east and south, and by Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan on the north. The war is fought in Kandahar and also in the south. How has the environment / physical geography of...
    3,557 Words | 9 Pages
  • Post 2014 Afghanistan - 402 Words
    While much of current international attention is focussed on the time from now to 2014, with the enteqal (handover) process moving into the focus – President Karzai just had defined the first seven areas of security responsibility affair, namely three full provinces and four other provincial capitals – in particular many Afghans look at the post-2014 period with fear. Our guest blogger Almut Wieland-Karimi(*) has thought about some scenarios – interestingly one which features a negotiated...
    402 Words | 2 Pages
  • How the Taliban Changed Afghanistan
    Written For a Sophomore English Class How the Taliban Changed Afghanistan Khaled Hosseini’s novel, The Kite Runner, follows the life of a young boy living in Afghanistan; a very different Afghanistan than the one we know today. Through his eyes we see the country he loves, his home, torn apart by a war with the Soviet Union, then a civil war, before finally being taken over by an extremely strict religious group called the Taliban. This series of horrible events destroys everything he...
    1,109 Words | 3 Pages
  • Technology Innovations in Afghanistan - Summary
    Technology innovations in Afghanistan Afghanistan is one of the developing countries situated in Asia, the people of this country have faced wars and revolutions many times due to which they were not able to progress rapidly but after year 2000 onwards, UN has helped a lot the people of Afghanistan in every sphere specially in the cases of progress and prosperity which also includes the introduction of different kinds of technology innovations. We have many examples just like 3G...
    803 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Social Differences of the Afghanistan People
    Kent Luong The Social Differences of the Afghanistan People In Afghanistan, there are many ethnic groups among whom segregation exists. Imagine being a part of one that’s really looked down upon. The life of that person would be so cruel that nobody would be able to even imagine the misery and the pain that they have to endure. Afghanistan is a country with immense diversity due to the different ethnic groups that it has had for a very long time. Despite living in the same country for hundreds...
    1,108 Words | 3 Pages
  • Afghanistan s Drug Trade
    DRUGS & CRIME Discuss the reasons behind the increased use of heroin in recent years. Explain why you believe the international community is unable to control the desire for and trafficking of heroin from Afghanistan? The use of heroin is on the rise among our nation and is spreading throughout segments of the population, which was once considered unlikely to use. Heroin use has nearly doubled since 2007, growing from 373,000 users a year to 669,000 in 2012, according to the Substance Abuse...
    386 Words | 2 Pages
  • Involvement of India in Afghanistan Issue
    Involvement Of India in Afghanistan Due to its geo-strategic location between the Central Asian, South Asian, and Middle Eastern security complexes, Afghanistan is often defined as an insulator state, and sometimes also as a connector. This in-between position has led to constant instability: ever since the creation of the Durrani Empire, the country has suffered from internal power struggles as well as outside interference. External attempts to control Afghanistan have nonetheless proven...
    1,425 Words | 4 Pages
  • Afghanistan Poverty Profile - 1670 Words
    POVERTY PROFILE AFGHANISTAN IDENTIFY COUNTRY I choose Afghanistan to write about because we have had so much going on with that country and my boyfriend is reading a book on the crisis in Islam so I thought it would give us something interesting to talk about! Afghanistan is located in the middle east of the world. There exact spot is 35°north and 65° east. It is surrounded by Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Bhutan. Afghanistan is slightly smaller than the size of Texas and has...
    1,670 Words | 6 Pages
  • Oppression: Afghanistan and Dressmaker Shop
    English 26 Essay 4: Final Draft Kamila’s dressmaker shop, icebreaker in Afghan Afghan women have been experienced different kinds of oppression by Taliban during the last 16 years. Women here barely have civil rights or freedom; they can’t talk with men and they have to cover their body and face all the time. What’s the worst, women in Afghan women are not allowed to get education and work positions.The Dressmaker of Khair Khana, by Gayle...
    1,111 Words | 4 Pages
  • Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan - 411 Words
    Michael Harris English II Honors May 19th, 2013 Montgomery The Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan On April of 1978, the Afghan central government was just overthrown their own leader, Mohammad Duad Khan. A group of military officials on a quest for power led by Nur Mohammad Taraki, a distinct military general. To replace Duad Khan, two Marxist political groups fill in. The Khalq, or the people’s political group, and the Parcham, the Banner Party. “The new government, which had little popular...
    411 Words | 2 Pages
  • Assessing State Fragility of Afghanistan
    ASSESSING STATE FRAGILITY: AFGHANISTAN State Fragility Report INB355 Prepared for: Dr. Abdur Rob Khan Prepared by: Hasin Sadeque ( Niaz Mahmood (1030594530 Table of Content Content | Page No. | Introduction and Historical Background | 3 | Executive Summary | 4 | Research Summary | 5-6 | Primary Drivers (Governance, Human Development, Security and Crime | 7-9 | Secondary Drivers | 10-11 | Possible Future...
    4,859 Words | 19 Pages
  • Women's Rights in Afghanistan - 855 Words
    Women's Rights: Women's Rights in Afghanistan have been an issue for many decades. After the Soviet occupied government diminished and the Taliban came into power, women's rights also diminished. Women in Afghanistan are looked at as nothing but homemakers and a means of reproduction. The horrific beatings of women have become a very common thing within Afghanistan and the Taliban. Even after the Taliban was removed Women's rights became insignificant. The women of Afghanistan have had to...
    855 Words | 3 Pages
  • US strategy in Afghanistan - 588 Words
    The agreement would allow not only military trainers to stay to build up the Afghan army and police, but also American special forces soldiers and air power to remain. The prospect of such a deal has already been met with anger among Afghanistan’s neighbours including, publicly, Iran and, privately, Pakistan. It also risks being rejected by the Taliban and derailing any attempt to coax them to the negotiating table, according to one senior member of Hamid Karzai’s peace council. A...
    588 Words | 2 Pages
  • Business Environment in Afghanistan - 15822 Words
    Contents Introduction 3 Objectives and Methodology 5 Choice of Methodology 5 Type of Research 5 Questionnaire 6 1. Conditions of Business in Afghanistan 7 1.1 Geography 7 1.2 People of Afghanistan 8 1.3 Political System 8 1.3.1 Current Political Situation 9 1.4 Current Economic Situation 10 1.4.1 Living Conditions 11 1.5 Business opportunities in Afghanistan 12 1.5.1 Investment Opportunities 13 1.6 Agriculture 13 1.6.1 Opportunities 13...
    15,822 Words | 49 Pages
  • Afghanistan Till 9/11
    Afghanistan (/ʌfˈɡʌnɪstɑːn/; Listeni/æfˈɡænɨstæn/; Persian: افغانستان‎; Pashto: Afġānistān‎), officially the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, is a landlocked sovereign state forming part of South Asia,[8] Central Asia,[9] and to some extent Western Asia. It has a population of around 30 million inhabiting an area of approximately 647,500 km2 (250,001 sq mi), making it the 42nd most populous and 41st largest nation in the world. It is bordered by Pakistan in the south and the east, Iran in the...
    409 Words | 2 Pages
  • Post 2014 Afghanistan - 721 Words
    PrintFriendly.com: Print web pages, create PDFs http://www.printfriendly.com/print?url=http://tribune.com.pk/story/44922... Afghan endgame uncertainties October 10, 2012 There is merit in Pakistan’s urgings that withdrawal of troops to be in sync with develo‐ pments on political front. The writer was Pakistan’s ambassador to the EU from 2002-2004 and to the US in 1999 tariq.fatemi@tribune.com.pk President Asif Ali Zardari’s meetings with Afghan President Hamid Karzai and US...
    721 Words | 3 Pages
  • Afghanistan: Life Under the Taliban
    Afghanistan is one of the poorest and most troubled countries in the world. The land that occupies Afghanistan has a long history of domination by foreign conquerors and strife among internally warring factions. At the gateway between Asia and Europe, this land was conquered by Darius I of Babylonia circa 500 B.C., and Alexander the Great of Macedonia in 329 B.C., among others. In recent years, war and lawlessness had destroyed much of the country; millions of people went into exile and brought...
    3,157 Words | 9 Pages
  • A Brief History of Afghanistan - 3234 Words
    A Brief History of Afghanistan The story of Afghanistan is in so many ways a very tragic one. Afghanistan is one of the most impoverished nations of the world. It is one of the most war-torn, most ravaged, and most beleaguered of nations. It is a nation that has been beset by invasion, external pressure and internal upheaval since before the time of Alexander the Great. Its people are a people who have endured more than most of us can ever imagine. In fact, for many Afghanis, all that has...
    3,234 Words | 10 Pages
  • The Invasion of Afghanistan by Us - 492 Words
    Twelve years have passed since the invasion of Afghanistan by US, British and Canadian troops and much has changed. Some are very beneficial like all girl schools, efforts to stop drug trade and sense of democracy in Afghanistan, states Michael Turner, US congressman of third district of Ohio. He explains how the education of women is a drastic change from a mere four years ago, where few women could rarely set foot out of home without a male chaperone, and even fewer knew how to read or write,...
    492 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Us Troops in Afghanistan - 280 Words
    I am against the US troops in Afghanistan. First of all, it made many American soldiers and families feeling of agony. For example, after more than 10 years of war in Afghanistan, the U.S. reached a milestone on Wednesday when the 2,000th American died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, CNN reports. Marine Cpl. Taylor J. Baune of Andover, was killed in Helmand province, Afghanistan, according to The Star-Tribune. Baune had married his wife just three months prior to his deployment. So,...
    280 Words | 1 Page
  • Womens Oppression in Afghanistan - 3493 Words
    Talibanning Women’s Rights: The Eternal Struggle Before the Taliban, a militant group that governed according to a strict sharia law, ruled Afghanistan in 1996, women were gaining rights and access to things they had never before hoped or imagined for. Once the Taliban came to power, all of the progress that they had made in the years past spiraled backwards and women had no rights throughout the entire country. The Taliban stood by a strict form of the Sharia, or Islamic, law. The...
    3,493 Words | 10 Pages
  • Afghanistan Post-2014 - 3128 Words
    ANALYTICAL PAPER AFGHANISTAN POST 2014; By: Waqas Sulehri AFGHANISTAN POST 2014; IMPERATIVES, DRIVERS AND SCENARIOS Introduction 1. Afghanistan has remained under challenging conditions since 1979 with major transitional periods almost every decade that badly affected the lives of its people. Firstly, war against former USSR, then an internal war, and lately a war along as well as against the US-led NATO forces, which has had its effects inside Afghanistan as well as...
    3,128 Words | 11 Pages
  • Pakistan Afghanistan Relations - 3165 Words
    Border Disputes between Pakistan and Afghanistan: Historical, political and Strategic Perspective Introduction: Pakistan came in to being on Islamic ideology revolving around the concept of Muslim Ummah and destined to be a symbol of universal Islamic solidarity across the globe. According to the first Prime Minister of Pakistan, Liaqat Ali Khan, ‘A cardinal feature of this ideology (of Pakistan) is to make Muslim brotherhood a living reality. It is therefore, part of the mission which...
    3,165 Words | 9 Pages
  • Afghanistan-Taliban and Their Downfall
    AFGHANISTAN-TALIBAN AND THEIR DOWNFALL 5. Geo-Strategic Importance of Afghanistan. Afghanistan is Central Asia’s land locked country, spread over an area of 253, 861 miles. Bordered on the North by the Republics of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, North-East by the Chinese province of Sinkiang, on the South-East by Pakistan, and on the West by Iran. Afghanistan’s geopolitical importance has been that of a buffer state first between the Tsarist Russian and the British Indian Empires...
    1,396 Words | 4 Pages
  • Legitimate Business in Afghanistan - 1286 Words
    Mustafa Muneer – 11748 Undergraduate Student, American University of Afghanistan Introduction to Business Dr. Sujatha Chandarlapaty 10th December, 2013 To what extent legitimate business is essential in Afghanistan? In all countries of the world there are people who are involved in various types of businesses and of-course legitimate and illegitimate businesses are exist among those. The question whether a business is legitimate or not is upon on rules and regulations of that...
    1,286 Words | 4 Pages
  • Afghanistan Today: The Current Situation
    Afghanistan Today: Jot-notes Involvement of Other Nations -4 dozen projects rebuilding the infrastructure of Afghanistan - Costing America over 60 billion dollars since 2001 - rebuilding/building of roads, schools, energy sources, plantations, jobs, etc. - difficulty of transformation due to people, location, expenses - what is being rebuilt or built – building and maintaining roads, -increase supply of reliable electricity, expand access to portable water, to design, construct and...
    808 Words | 3 Pages
  • Current Events: Afghanistan - 439 Words
    Current Events Women’s rights in Afghanistan is an issue that must be brought to international attention. It has been only six years since the Taliban regime was taken out of power in Kabul. Many positive changes have occurred since then for improving Women’s rights and participation within society. When the Taliban were in power, women were not allowed to work, go to school, receive medical care from male doctors, travel without male relatives, and they were regarded as non-citizens without...
    439 Words | 2 Pages
  • Youth Life in Afghanistan - 1377 Words
    Essay: Sirat Ahmad Khalid Date: 22/Jan/2013 For University Entrance at American University of Afghanistan I always remember the first time I was slapped in my right check in class 1 since my homework was not done by me. But that was misunderstood I actually did my homework it was so clean and artily written that the teacher misjudged me. I found life so tough and challengeable even in my honesty and perfection since childhood. I had to prepare myself for the ups and downs of life,...
    1,377 Words | 4 Pages
  • Pakistan and Real Life Afghanistan
    Parvana by Deborah Ellis Parvana is a book that is closely based on real life Afghanistan. The book is about a young girl’s fight to survive. Parvana is a 12-year-old girl and she lives in an area that is under the control of the Taliban Regime, a group religious extremist. They enforce violent, radical laws. For example they decided that women must wear burkas at all time when outside and that they are not allowed inside shops. Basically they take away all of the women’s rights and are...
    373 Words | 1 Page
  • Afghanistan Drug Trade - 1374 Words
    Lauren Graupman Mr. Kohrt Global 28 March 2013 Afghanistan Drug Trade The sound of gunshots fills the empty space right outside the door. People are screaming and loved ones are holding each other, fearing for their lives. This chaos is a direct result of the Afghanistan Drug Trade. Afghanistan is a small country in the Middle East. It is located North of the Arabian Sea, and it borders many countries including Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Iran, Tajikistan and India. All of the drug...
    1,374 Words | 4 Pages
  • Study Guide: History of Afghanistan
    Study guide: Afghanistan Fall 2011 Essay questions: When did Afghanistan become an independent state? What events prompted the declaration of independence? Explain factional (Khalq/Parcham) divisions within the PDPA. -The party was divided into factions, with the Khalq and Parcham being the two largest ones. The split was mainly due to ideological and economic reasons. The Khalq supporters consisted mainly of ethnic Pashtuns from rural areas, while Parcham supported consisted...
    977 Words | 5 Pages
  • Business Investment Is Good in Afghanistan
    Word Count: 1044 Mohammad Nasim Rahimi ID#: 9504 Evaluation Paper Final Business Investment Is Good in Afghanistan In fact, business investment in Afghanistan has begun a very short time ago. The reason that businessmen did not invest in that time was because they did not have enough opportunities. Also, the businessmen and investors were not seeing any income in Afghanistan. Besides, there were many other reasons which were avoiding investors to invest in this devastated country. However,...
    1,119 Words | 4 Pages
  • Drug Trafficking in Afghanistan Mun
    Cathedral Model United Nations 2011 Study Guide Study Guide UNITED NATIONS COMMISSION ON NARCOTIC DRUGS Dear Delegates, It is my pleasure to welcome you to Cathedral Model United Nations 2011! The simulated UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs has an extremely ambitious topic area to cover. Each delegate shall, explore the tumultuous world of Afghanistan's illicit drug trade; treading through the mountainous borders of Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iran, while uncovering a trail of drugs, an...
    5,150 Words | 15 Pages
  • The Effects of Afghanistan War on Women
    Fighting is constant in Afghanistan and it affects women significantly. The men in their lives control women, and because of the oppressive government, they hold no power in society. A Thousand Splendid Suns, written by Khaled Hosseini is a story of two young women, Laila and Mariam, who face and overcome many hardships and live in a country destroyed by political oppression and war. Hosseini exposes the inner strength of Afghan women through the point of view of these two women; a strength that...
    777 Words | 2 Pages
  • Enviromental Issues in Afghanistan - 902 Words
    Environmental issues in Afghanistan Kapisa province Environmental issues in Afghanistan predate the political turmoil of the past few decades. Forests and wetlands have been depleted by centuries of grazing and farming, practices which have only increased with modern population growth. In Afghanistan, environmental conservation and economic concerns are not at odds; with 80% of the population dependent on herding or farming, the welfare of the environment is critical to the economic welfare...
    902 Words | 4 Pages
  • The U.S. War in Afghanistan (Essay)
    At the time of my writing, the NATO war in Afghanistan has just become the longest war in U.S. history, a status it seems likely to retain for some time. It has been, and remains, a very strange war, all the stranger now that General Stanley McChrystal has been fired as commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan following the lamest Douglas MacArthur impression on record. He has been replaced by General David Petraeus, the father and executor of the doctrine that lay behind the eventual U.S....
    2,567 Words | 7 Pages
  • womens rights in afghanistan - 770 Words
    Women’s Rights in Afghanistan Afghanistan is one of the worst countries to be a woman. Girls’ schools are frequently attacked, high-profile women’s rights advocates have been targeted and killed, and violence against girls and women continues to be a major problem (“Women in Afghanistan”). More females die during pregnancies and childbirth than almost anywhere else in the world. Life is hard for women fighting for their rights in Afghanistan. The Taliban, an extremist militia, seized...
    770 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Kite Runner & Escape to Afghanistan
    The transition from adulthood to childhood is certainly not a simple adjustment. Coming of age presents many challenging decisions, overwhelming pressures, and emotions that can be very difficult for adolescents to overcome. In the excerpts that we studied, The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini and Escape to Afghanistan by Farah Ahmedi, the stories of two young people are told, revealing their struggles with coming of age and their personal life battles. The Kite Runner tells the story of the...
    1,112 Words | 3 Pages
  • Agricultural Technology in Afghanistan - 5470 Words
    Agricultural Technology in Afghanistan Advances in agricultural technology have brought Afghanistan into the modern era. They have allowed the country the opportunity to succeed in the global market while at the same time turning it into the war ravaged nation seen on television every night. Its history has been filled with stories of both prosperity and defeat. Agriculture has been impacted heavily by war and lack of modern tools, equipment and common know how. Although many have come to...
    5,470 Words | 16 Pages
  • Human Rights in Afghanistan - 4911 Words
    Human rights in Afghanistan The situation of Human Rights in Afghanistan is a topic of some controversy and conflict. While the Taliban were well known for numerous human rights abuses, several human rights violations continue to take place in the post-Taliban government era.[citation needed] Post Taliban The Bonn Agreement of 2001 established the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) as a national human rights institution to protect and promote human rights and to investigate...
    4,911 Words | 16 Pages
  • Pakistan and Afghanistan Issue - 1502 Words
    Pakistan Afghanistan issue Afghanistan and Pakistan share multiple strands of culture, history, religion, and civilization, but the two countries have never succeeded in establishing bilateral relations free of tensions. Rather, passive antagonism and mistrust have marked bilateral ties for the larger part of more than half a century following the creation of Pakistan. The intensity of hostility has varied under different regimes in Afghanistan, however, and though brief periods of cordiality...
    1,502 Words | 5 Pages
  • Withdrawal of American Forces from Afghanistan
    1 ARTICLE WITHDRAWAL OF U.S TROOPS FROM AFGHANISTAN AND ITS IMPACT ON REGION WRITTEN BY: USAMA PERVAIZ OUTLINE 1.COMPLETE BACKGROUND OF THE SITUATION 2.PLAN OF REMOVAL OF FORCES 3.POST REMOVAL PLAN 4.IMPACT ON INDIA,PAKISTAN AND TAJIKISTAN 5.FUTURE RELATIONS OF PAKISTAN AND AFGHANISTAN 6.CHALLENGES AND OPPURTUNITIES FOR PASKISTAN 7.SOME RECOMMENDATIONS 8.SCENARIOS OF AFGHANISTAN 9.CONCLUSION. ______________________________________________________________________________ The Withdrawal of U.S....
    5,761 Words | 16 Pages
  • Why Canadians Should Leave Afghanistan
    since February 2002, approximately 15, 000 Canadian soldiers have served in Afghanistan. 78 Canadian Forces (CF) casualties have occurred, including one diplomat. The role of the Canadian Forces in Afghanistan is often debated. Many disagree with the mission and want the CF to leave Afghanistan now. Doing this however would only be failing the Canadian commitment to the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and NATO. Canada should keep its commitment and remain in Afghanistan until the...
    1,362 Words | 4 Pages
  • Position Paper Us vs Afghanistan
    On September 11th 2001 America was attacked by terrorist. America will recover from this attack but recovery is not enough. These types of attacks and the people who conduct them must be eliminated from the world. The attack on America was so savage – and so unnecessary – that any response short of annihilating the perpetrators is not only inappropriate, it is unconstitutional and inhumane. We hate war as much as anyone does it is ugly; it causes misery, suffering and death... Unfortunately, we...
    2,524 Words | 7 Pages
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  • Pakistan and Afghanistan: Neighbors in War and Peace
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  • Should Canada Get Out of Afghanistan?
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  • Changing Gender Roles of Men and Women in Afghanistan
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  • Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
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  • Oppression of Afghan Women - 649 Words
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  • opium - 698 Words
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  • Black - 463 Words
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  • Kite Runner - 349 Words
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    349 Words | 1 Page
  • The Kite Runner - 1578 Words
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