"White Collar Crime" Essays and Research Papers

  • White Collar Crime

    3B 5-1-15 White-Collar Crimes One would ask why someone with a high position, who is already earning vast amounts of cash or resources, would use backhanded tactics to maintain or advance their power. Unfortunately, the love of money or power have sent what seemed respectable people into corruption. White-collar crimes come in many forms and typically include fraud, bribery, Ponzi, schemes, insider trading, etc. They are mostly motivated by financial gain and are nonviolent crimes. This crisis...

    Arrest, Corporate crime, Crime 1176  Words | 2  Pages

  • White Collar Crime

    White Collar Crime White collar crime is prevalent and brought to our attention more and more by the media since the mid to late 1990s. With the downfall of companies such as Enron, Tyco Toys and WorldCom MCI white collar criminals are facing lengthy prison sentences. Greed and personal vendettas are what have led our country to understand and gain more knowledge about these corporations and the corrupt CEOs that have brought them to their demise. “White collar crime is defined as various crimes...

    Accounting scandals, Chief executive officer, Corporate crime 1401  Words | 3  Pages

  • White Collar Crime

    White Collar crime is an quickly arising topic in the field of criminal justice. It has just recently been made all the more popular with the high profile court cases of companies like Enron and Martha Stewart. In the course text book, Controversies in White Collar Crime by Gary W. Potter, author of the book Thinking About Crime Professor James Q. Wilson, "dismisses the importance of white collar crime…". He argues four different points of why white collar crime is not "real" crime or should be...

    Assault, Corporate crime, Crime 960  Words | 3  Pages

  • White Collar Crime

    head: White Collar Crime White Collar Crime Stephanie A. Saldaña-Sánchez Troy University Soc 4421 XTIA Abi Mehdipour 21 September 2009 White Collar Crime Despite of our individual freedom and equal opportunity, we live in a society where the harsh realities include social and economic inequalities of class, race, and ethnicity, as well as of age and gender. Our society also analyzes issues of social and economic inequality, crime, and criminal justice. The trend of white collar crime...

    Confidence trick, Crime, Crimes 933  Words | 3  Pages

  • Crime: Fraud and Overall White Collar

    phenomenon” is known as white collar crime. White collar crime was firstly talked by Edwin H. Sutherland who was a criminologist. He defined white collar crime in a presidential meeting of the American Sociological Society. This meeting was held at the state of Philadelphia in December 1939 to 1940s. He defined white collar crime as “a crime committed by a person of respectability and high social status in the course of his occupation”. (“Sutherland, 1949:9”). White collar crime includes several of...

    Credit card fraud, Crime, Crimes 1370  Words | 4  Pages

  • White Collar and Political Crimes

    White Collar and Political Crimes SEC 340 Criminology and the Criminal Justice System   White Collar and Political Crimes I am a criminologist and I have been hired to assist the Farm Workers Union. The Union is making allegations that each year thousands of farm workers are sickened by exposure to pesticides used on the farms where they work. Exposure is said to occur when the workers are in the fields and helicopters spray the nearby fields. However, the industry is...

    Crime, Crimes, Criminal justice 1841  Words | 5  Pages

  • White Collar Crime

    Is White Collar Crime an Inside Job? Simply put, the point that Charles Ferguson is trying to get across in his documentary, The Inside Job is that economics is exactly that, it’s an inside job; with many elite employees involved. Economics is a profession, and at the end of the day, it all comes down to power, and the money being brought home by those at the top. Throughout the documentary Ferguson does an excellent job revealing the not so behind the scenes action, that many just don’t pick up...

    Corporate crime, Crime, Criminology 1829  Words | 5  Pages

  • White Collar Crime

    definition of white collar and white collar crime * Various types of white collar crime B. Thesis statement: There are 3 causes of white collar and 5 way to combat with white collar crime. II. The cause of white collar crime is opportunities to commit crime. A. The loophole of the law and security B. An individual well known the operation of a company, the chances to commit fraud is higher. III. Second causes of white collar crime are workers...

    Accounting scandals, Confidence trick, Crime 2504  Words | 7  Pages

  • Types of White Collar Crime

    of White Collar Crime Types of White Collar Crime White Collar Crime in our country has been highly publicized over the past decade or so. A few of the well-known events are WorldCom (2002), Enron (2001), and the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme (2008). The fact is white collar crime is on the rise and it comes in many forms; embezzlement, identity theft, insider trading, insurance fraud, money laundering, price fixing, and many more. Telemarketing has become one of the fastest growing white collar...

    Confidence trick, Crime, Criminology 1541  Words | 4  Pages

  • White Collar Crime

    Welcome to the age of white collar crime. A time when the words thieves and businessmen go hand in hand. White collar criminals don't get their hands dirty in their work. They use their heads to get what they want instead of using a little muscle. These criminals are just as dangerous as the rapists and murderers. In these times, even the most seemingly respectable people are suspected of white collar crimes. President Clinton and the first lady Hillary Clinton have been tangled up in the Whitewater...

    Confidence trick, Crime, Criminology 1482  Words | 4  Pages

  • White Collar Crimes

    White collar crime and its changing dimensions in India Meaning Of White Collar Crime . This notion was laid down for the first time in the field of criminology by Prof. Edwin Sutherland in 1941. He defined white collar crime as “crime committed by persons of respectability and high social status in course of their occupation”. Examples of it include fraudulent advertisements, infringement of patents, publication of falsified balance sheet of business, passing of goods, concealment of defects in...

    Accounting scandals, Crime, Criminology 1952  Words | 7  Pages

  • Understanding White Collar Crime

    Understanding White Collar Crime Donald J. Joslyn Tri County Tech Understanding White Collar Crime In the United States, there are many different types of crimes that are committed. One type of crime that is considered non-violent would be white-collar crime. Under white collared crimes there are hundreds of different types of crimes that would fall under this category. Sociologist and criminologists have come up with many different theories to what white-collar crime is and what type of people...

    Crime, Criminology, Federal Bureau of Investigation 1023  Words | 3  Pages

  • white collar crime

    Here is Your Short Speech on White Collar Crime ! The concept of “white collar crime” found its place in criminology for the first time in 1941 when Sutherland published his research paper on white collar criminality in the American Sociological Review. He defined white collar crime as a “crime committed by persons of respectability and high social status in course of their occupation”. A white-collar criminal belongs to upper socio-economic class who violates the criminal law while conducting...

    Confidence trick, Crime, Criminal law 945  Words | 3  Pages

  • White Collar Crimes

    Paper 2: White Collar Crimes and Consequences Financially motivated crimes, also known as white-collar crimes, are a pervasive problem that seems to not attract much attention. Unlike its counter part, blue-collar crimes, white-collar crimes are not exactly exciting or interesting. Blue-collar crimes like murder, shootings, rape and robbery are often very horrific, thus they receive a great deal of attention. Some say that the effects of these crimes tend to be exaggerated. A researcher in this...

    Accounting scandals, Crimes, Criminology 1812  Words | 3  Pages

  • White Collar Crimes (Embezzlement)- Prevention and Detection

    professor at University of Scranton stated “white-collar crimes have further, reaching, deeper and more lasting impact than street crime.” Thefts by employees are of the most costly problems facing new and existing businesses. Experts have shown company theft has the potential to reach 240$ billion dollars which includes intellectual property stolen during that year. It isn’t a surprise that the cost of embezzlement is two to three times than that of street crimes. Also 30-50% of all businesses affected...

    Business, Crime, Embezzlement 1837  Words | 6  Pages

  • Sociology White Collar

    Essay Question The types of crime had had more widespread dangers to civil society both in term of human cost and tax dollar, is White collar crime, and which conflict had more extensive consequences such as death, harm, and cost, etc. Approaching the situation by comparing and contrasting toward crime and the differences are probably readily apparent, but to understand we need to view the perspective with conflict versus functional theory. Furthermore, Society requires developing ways...

    Crime, Criminal justice, Criminology 1297  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theories of Crime Causation

    Individual Project CRJS 105 – Theories of Crime Causation November 11th, 2010 Abstract The following will examine the differences between criminalists, criminologists and forensic psychologists. It will then transition into how what exactly is a white collar crime and a blue collar crime. Lastly the paper will discuss the differences between index-one and index-two crimes as defined by the UCR. Media Portrayal of Crime Introduction With the prevalence of crime being portrayed in the media world...

    Assault, Crime, Crimes 1634  Words | 5  Pages

  • Crimes of the Powerful

    Throughout crime statistics, crimes of the powerful, for example white collar, corporate and state crimes seem to be almost non-existent. Over the last few decades crimes of the powerful are beginning to gain some sort of emphasis with regards its recognition. Crimes of the powerful have been gaining awareness since approximately the mid 1980’s. For example legislations towards corporations have been changed, gradually establishing criminal categories. Relatively recently it has been recognised...

    Corporate crime, Crime, Criminal justice 2656  Words | 7  Pages

  • Organized Crime / Corporate Crime / Social Stratification

    Organized Crime / Corporate Crime The difference between white collar crime and corporate crime are very slight. White collar crime is usually conducted by people and corporate crimes are conducted by an organization. White collar crime is usually conducted by higher classed individuals such as CEO's or high level employee's of an organization. The individuals utilize the organization in order to exploit the company's investors or employee's. A corporate crime utilizes the organization to break...

    Ascribed status, Corporate crime, Criminology 904  Words | 3  Pages

  • What is crime?

    What is Crime? Crime is a highly contested subject that is approached by an array of academic disciplines. It draws upon sociology, psychology, politics, law, philosophy, economics and more which makes defining crime difficult. Criminology is not the only discipline that focuses on crime. Defining crime is nebulous in that it has gone through the process of constant evolution and has many paradigms. Prior to the period of ‘The Enlightenment’ or the ‘Age of reason’ in the 18th century, ideas surrounding...

    Crime, Criminal law, Criminology 979  Words | 3  Pages

  • facts and perception of crime in the united states

     PERCEPTION OF CRIME AND ITS LEVELS IN THE USA Name Institutional affiliation Introduction Failure to demystify crime by the Media has been both tragic and unfortunate resulting to a skewed perception of crime by the community in now which civic life has gotten hectic . Civility has been undermined and trust almost impossible to build. Such is the demerit of negative popularization of Crime by the Media. This essay will attempt to lay bare, Facts...

    Crime, Criminal justice, Criminology 931  Words | 6  Pages

  • White Collar Crime Cost Society more than Street Crime

     White Collar Crime Cost Society more than Street Crime Debbre Paige Sociology I Professor: Ngo Lee Strayer University June 13, 2014 Abstract White Collar Crime cost society more than street crime because it affects everyone from the C.E.O. of the company to the common consumer. White Collar Crime usually consist of non-violent behavior; involving activities such as; deception, corruption, embezzlement, breach of trust, and health care fraud, just to name...

    Corporate crime, Crime, Criminology 1022  Words | 6  Pages

  • Characteristics of a White Collar Criminal

     The Common Characteristics of a White Collar Offender (STUDENT NAME) White Collar Crimes (INSTRUCTOR NAME) (DATE) The Common Characteristics of a White Collar Offender Anyone that has taken a class or even worked a “hint” of a white collar crimes understands that Edwin H. Sutherland is responsible for coining the term. In his book, White Collar Crime, Sutherland defines white collar crime as “[a]pproximately as a crime committed by a person of respectability and high...

    Accounting scandals, Confidence trick, Crime 753  Words | 4  Pages

  • Increasing Bank Frauds and Cyber Crimes

    INTRODUCTION According to Edwin Sutherland's definition, white-collar crime refers to a relatively uniform behaviour involving actions undertaken by individuals to contribute to the financial success of the organization. They violate the law for the firm. Yet the definition is loose. An offence would be called a white-collar crime insofar as it represents violation of a legal rule constructed to govern business affairs or occupational practice and insofar as the law violation took place as part...

    Computer crime, Crime, Criminology 2352  Words | 7  Pages

  • How Might Criminology Help Explain Corporate Crime?

    ‘How might criminology help explain corporate crime?’ Corporate crime is a wide-ranging term, covering a vast range of offenses with differing types of perpetrators, modes of operation, effects and victims (Hale et al. 2005, p.268-9). Types of corporate crime range from financial crimes including illegal share dealings, merger, takeovers and tax evasion to crimes directly against the consumer, employment relations and crimes against the environment. In the past criminology has put little energy...

    Corporate crime, Crime, Criminology 1669  Words | 5  Pages

  • White Collar Crime 2

    White Collar Crime Most people think that the only crime you can commit is drug dealing, murder, assault etc. Society usually thinks of crime as something violent happening to a victim. People usually class this as street crime. Some people don’t know that there is a different type of crime which involves business professionals and sometimes the government. It usually involves a lot of money being used illegally to make more money; this is called white collar crime. White collar crime is a finically...

    Bernard Madoff, Confidence trick, Corporate crime 619  Words | 3  Pages

  • Understanding White Collar Crime

    T I O N II Understanding White-Collar Crime Definitions, Extent, and Consequences S ecti on Hi g h l i g h ts •• •• •• •• •• •• White-Collar Crime: An Evolving Concept Modern Conceptualizations of White-Collar Crime Extent of White-Collar Crime Consequences of White-Collar Crime Public Attitudes About White-Collar Crime Characteristics of White-Collar Offenders A 34 s noted in the introduction, Edwin Sutherland created the concept of white-collar crime more than 70 years ago to draw...

    Corporate crime, Crime, Criminal justice 20605  Words | 64  Pages

  • White Collar Crimes

    The FBI defines white collar crimes as lying, cheating, and stealing. The Department of Justice defines them as non violent illegal activities that involve deception. White collar crimes falls under the purview of Criminal law. They are usually committed for financial gain. They are committed by means of deception used by people who are in an entrepreneurial professional or semi professional position. Not all people that commit white collar crimes are semi or professionals or have special technical...

    Crime, Criminal justice, Criminal law 463  Words | 2  Pages

  • White Collar Crimes

    41, 42, & 43 Ch. 41, 42, & 43 The term white-collar was significant because it made people think of businessmen in suits, managerial positions, and executive positions who were normally thought of as respective businessmen and professionals, and this idea contradicted the dominant idea that criminals were mostly the lower class, the underemployed and came from impoverished communities. This idea was radical to suggest that upstanding white-collar workers were comparable to the lower-class thugs...

    Crime, Criminology, Gang 653  Words | 2  Pages

  • white collar crimes

    2277 3630 WHITE COLLAR CRIMES IN INDIA G. NAGARAJAN*; DR. J. KHAJA SHERIFF** *Assistant Professor, Department of Management Studies, Indira institute of Management & Research, Pandur, Thiruvallur. Tamilnadu. **Assistant Professor, Department of Management Studies, University of Madras, Chennai – 600005. ABSTRACT This paper provides a detailed understanding behind the motives of people committing crimes. Researchers have named ―the people committing crime, where the crimes were minimal...

    Accounting scandals, Confidence trick, Corporate crime 3983  Words | 16  Pages

  • White Collar and Corporate Crime

    Why does white collar and corporate crime tend to go undetected, Or if detected not prosecuted White collar and corporate crimes are crimes that many people do not associate with criminal activity. Yet the cost to the country due to corporate and white collar crime far exceeds that of "street" crime and benefit fraud. White collar and corporate crimes refer to crimes that take place within a business or institution and include everything from Tax fraud to health and safety breaches. Corporate...

    Corporate crime, Corporation, Crime 559  Words | 2  Pages

  • White Collar Crime

    Global Journal of Finance and Management ISSN 0975 - 6477 Volume 3, Number 1 (2011), pp. 69-76 © Research India Publications http://www.ripublication.com/gjfm.htm Forensic Accounting: A Tool of Detecting White Collar Crimes in Corporate World R.B. Sharma1 and Alaa Mohamad Maloain2 Assistant Professor, 2Assistant Professor & Supervisor Dept. of Accounting, College of Business Administration Al-Kharj University, Al-Kharj, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract Forensic accounting investigates financial...

    Accounting scandals, Corporate crime, Corporation 3031  Words | 10  Pages

  • What Is The Differential Association Theory

    1 Differential Theory And White Collar Crimes Jessie Betts Florida A&M University Theories of Criminal Behavior Dr. Harris 3/8/2015 2 What is the Differential Association Theory? Differential Association is a certain theory in criminology developed by a man named Edward Sutherland. This theory by definition in the criminology prospective, proposes that through interaction with others, individuals learn different traits. Some of these traits that are learned are common traits such as...

    Confidence trick, Crime, Criminal justice 1361  Words | 6  Pages

  • Study Guide

    if the “white collarcrimes committed differ in any substantive manner from other more “blue collar crimes. “The phrase white-collar crime was coined in 1939 during a speech given by Edwin Sutherland to the American Sociological Society” (http://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/white-collar_crime). According to the Federal Bureau of Investigations, white collar crime costs the United States approximately three hundred billion dollars a year. That factor alone is what separates white collar crime from blue...

    Business ethics, Ethics, Immanuel Kant 1480  Words | 4  Pages

  • white collar crime

    CHAPTER I COCEPT AND SCOPE OF WHITE COLLAR CRIMES INTRODUCTION Our generation is witnessing a wave of economic crimes as never before. It looks impossible to come out of them. In such conditions many questions arise before us. The most important of those is, whether there was ever a fear of these economic crimes of such a great intensity that it will become impossible for us to deal with them? If yes, why we have not felt alarm of this fear? In order to get the logical answer to these questions...

    Crime, Crime statistics, Criminal justice 42804  Words | 108  Pages

  • White Collar Crime: the Effects and Punishments

    White Collar crime has been a hot topic since the 20th century. Edwin Sutherland introduced the term at the fourth annual meeting of the Sociological Association. At this meeting he explained who this type of criminal is and what the criminal does for a living. Sutherland developed a theory to try and fit this type of criminal. The theory is differential association. There are four different pieces of evidence to understand the theory. White collar crime ranges from Embezzlement to Mortgage Fraud...

    Accounting scandals, Crime, Crimes 5184  Words | 13  Pages

  • Social harm

    between ‘crime’ and ‘social harm’? Throughout the years, the ‘problem of crime’ has been a long debated subject due to its complexity. At some point, it was a matter of different regions, cultures, and particular laws that made it difficult for people to argue whether a certain thing was a crime or not. In spite of this fact, this problem still exists-for example: if, in one country a particular thing can be a right, in another one it can be a crime-such as abortion....

    Corporate crime, Corporation, Crime 929  Words | 3  Pages

  • Social Theories of white collar crime

    Social Theories and White Collar Crime Criminology 302 Social Theories and White Collar Crime Edward Sutherland believed that without including white-collar criminal offense as its own category it would contribute to errors in how we depicted the crime, understood the cause of offense, and evaluated crime in the justice system. (Simpson & Weisbud, 2009) Sutherland’s idea did not hold up well with scholars, due to missing information of the criminal, so his idea never took hold. Still...

    Credit card fraud, Crime, Crimes 419  Words | 2  Pages

  • Left Realism

    Lea and Jock Young (1984). Left Realists are interested to find out why crime was increasing so significantly Left Realism is critical of the perspectives which sees longer prison sentences as the solution to crime, (Right Realists) but also oppose the views of left idealists. Therefore it developed as a response to traditional Marxist and neo-Marxist approaches (Left idealists), which it accused of: * not taking crime seriously, and reducing it to simple moral panics induced by the capitalist...

    Corporate crime, Crime, Crime prevention 1356  Words | 6  Pages

  • Criminology in Pakistan

    Criminology in Pakistan Criminology Is Obsessed With the Crimes of the Powerless at the Expense of the Crimes of the Powerful One of the recurring themes of criminology is prejudicial application of law to various sections and groups in the society. “Law governs the poor and rich rules the law” profoundly reflects the divide in selective operation of law to the advantage of certain sections at the cost of others. Unfortunately this divide is also visible in the academic and intellectual...

    Corporate crime, Crime, Criminal justice 2089  Words | 6  Pages

  • Money Laundering

    Money Laundering Michael F. Adamson CJ 2400 Organizational and Occupational Crime Curry College Money Laundering Money laundering, in its most basic form, is the process by which large amounts of illegally obtained money is given the appearance of having originated from a legitimate source. There are many methods in which this can be accomplished and criminals are constantly coming up with new ideas on how to do so. If done successfully, it allows the criminals to maintain...

    Crime, Economics, Money laundering 742  Words | 3  Pages

  • History of the Fbi and Women

    1972—40 years ago this year—that women were allowed to join the ranks of FBI agents, reversing a policy that had been in place since the 1920s. The first major expansion in Bureau jurisdiction came in June 1910 when the Mann ("White Slave") Act was passed, making it a crime to transport women over state lines for immoral purpose. William J. Flynn, former head of the Secret Service, became Director of the Bureau of Investigation in July 1919 and was the first to use that title. From 2010 to 2012...

    FBI Academy, Federal Bureau of Investigation, J. Edgar Hoover 1574  Words | 4  Pages

  • Enron

    fraud.  White Collar Crime The White Collar Crime is victimless crime that is committed by someone for financial gain. The typical white-collar criminal is an office worker, business manager, fund manager or executive. Forensic accountants, auditors and whistle blowers identify and report white-collar crimes. Entities that investigate white-collar crimes include the FBI, Securities and Exchange Commission and the National Association of Securities Dealers. Examples of convicted white-collar criminals...

    Accounting scandals, Corporate crime, Enron 1062  Words | 3  Pages

  • Business Ethics Test 2 Review

    important regulations, Creates more penalties for White collar crimes. It makes each member of the Management Team sign the financial statement and they are now responsible for anything on those statements. -It creates an oversight board for Accounting Firms. title IX is white-collar crime penalty enhancements -provides that any person who attempts to commit white-collar crimes will be treated under the law as if the person had committed the crime -requires CEOs and CFOs to certify their periodic...

    Business ethics, Corporate crime, Criminology 1473  Words | 5  Pages

  • White collar crime book outline

    diverse set of actors—including executives, doctors, politicians, and computer hackers. The authors have attempted to infuse each chapter with a historical perspective by describing some selected cases from the past in order to illustrate that white-collar crime is not solely a contemporary social problem but has a long and vivid history. I. The History of a Concept a) Ponzi’s - Whereby investors' returns are paid for directly by later investors' investments, giving the false impression that the investment...

    Accounting scandals, Bankruptcy in the United States, Confidence trick 1917  Words | 14  Pages

  • Merton's Social Structure

    Crime is identified as an action that is prohibited by law or a failure to act as required by law. But where do these laws or rules come from? According to Emile Durkheim in his article “The Normal and the Pathological,” the first thing that is created by human interaction is rules. Humans interact and create these rules to survive because rules are fundamentally important. It is when a specific behavior, or rule, becomes important enough that it is called a crime when it is violated (Durkheim...

    Anthropology, Corporate crime, Criminology 2351  Words | 7  Pages

  • White Collar Crime vs. Street Crime

    Issues in Criminal Justice White Collar Crime vs. Street Crime: Which Is Worse? A general definition of crime is the wrong doing against public law. Society is plagued by crime whether it’s an assault or embezzlement both are wrong yet the image that comes to mind when defining the concept of a crime is usually a personal assault on someone. Rarely do we think of a CEO of a Fortune 500 company stealing from the business. Society is more exposed to street crime. Not a day goes by that we don’t...

    Assault, Corporate crime, Crime 709  Words | 2  Pages

  • Peregrine Financial Group- Case Study

    hundreds of White Collar crime, most of them; do not make it to headlines. It is up to society to ensure all this type of fraud are follow up and persecuted to ensure proper punishment to white collar criminals. In the other hand, persecuting this type of criminals is not always easy, and built up a case could be really costly, perhaps that is one of the reasons, mot of fraud cases within small-medium companies remain within   References David O. Friedrichs (2010). Trusted Criminals: White Collar...

    Accounting scandals, Commodity Exchange Act, Commodity Futures Trading Commission 882  Words | 3  Pages

  • Misappropriation of Assetin Public Sector

    Report, 2007). Based on research, percentage of organization reported fraud in previous 12 months are 37% from government and state-owned enterprise, 31% from listed companies, 28% from private sector and 4% from other organizations (Global Economic Crime Survey by PWC, 2011). Asset misappropriation frauds are divided into two categories which are: (1) the theft of cash and (2) the theft of non-cash assets. Misappropriation of assets may occur under different circumstances: (1) before the transaction...

    Accounting scandals, Crime, Crimes 1584  Words | 5  Pages

  • Fbi Federal Bureau of Investigation

    The formation of the FBI goes back to a group of special agents created in 1908, by Attorney General Charles Bonaparte, under President Theodore Roosevelt. It sprung up during the Progressive Era, a time when people supported a crime intervention team and believed government intervention was necessary in this type of society. Congress was also very supportive toward the Attorney General's plan. They enacted a law preventing the Department of Justice from engaging in secret service operatives, giving...

    Crime, Federal Bureau of Investigation, J. Edgar Hoover 1803  Words | 7  Pages

  • Accounting Fraud

     Accounting Fraud: A White Collar Crime Accounting Fraud: A White Collar Crime The CEO and CFO of a Swiss security systems company named Tyco, stole 150 million dollars from their company before being caught in 2002. At the height of the scandal, the CEO threw a 2 million dollar birthday party for his wife on a private island with guest performer Jimmy Buffet. After being caught, the CEO and CFO were sentenced to 8-25 years in prison and Tyco had to repay its investors 2.92 billion...

    Accounting scandals, Audit, Enron 2205  Words | 7  Pages

  • ; Lk; Lk;; Lk;

    1. Miller fits the average fraud perpetrator profile like do most Americans. Individuals, who commit white collar crimes such as fraud or embezzlement, look like your everyday working man or woman. They are dedicated, hardworking and trusted employees with no prior criminal record. They are well liked and respected members of the community. Miller is slightly different in the respect that the case did not specify that he possessed any extensive computer skills or knowledge other than that required...

    Crime, Criminal law, Employment 1193  Words | 4  Pages

  • Corporate Crime

    definition of white collar is of or relating to workers whose occupations usually does not involve manual labor. White collar crime is usually defined as any illegal offense that is committed in business or professional setting with the goal of achieving personal financial gain (whitecollarcrimefyi.com). The origin of the term white collar is traced back to 1939, to Professor Edwin Sutherland, of Indiana University, Pontell, Rosoff & Tillman (2002). Sutherland defined white collar crimes as “crimes...

    Charles Ponzi, Confidence trick, Crime 944  Words | 3  Pages

  • BUS-L201 Exam Review Sheet

    Larceny-don’t have possession and take it 29. Embezzlement-someone is in lawful possession and takes some (pockets funds) 30. Racketeer Influenced And Corrupt Organizations Act(RICO)-against white collar crime, started out bc of mob and bringing down mob bosses and has been expanded, allows for white collar crimes to be brought into Fed courts 31. Sarbanes-Oxley Act-requires executives to sign off on financial documents and statements and if found inaccurate then executives can be held liable 32...

    Income tax, Income tax in the United States, Possession 1275  Words | 3  Pages

  • Ethics

    Ethics of Profit, Part 3: The Profit Motive Posted March 29, 2011 Filed under: character, competition, corporations, decision-making, ethics, finance,profits, white collar crime | This is the third in a 3-part series on the ethics of profit. (See also Part 1 and Part 2.) As mentioned in previous postings, we should distinguish between our ethical evaluation of profit per se (which, after all, just means financial “gain”), and our ethical evaluation of the profit motive. After all, I don’t worry...

    Anxiety, Business ethics, Corporate crime 1162  Words | 3  Pages

  • Differential Reinforcement

    Sutherland in 1939. Another commonly used term for this theory of reinforcement is called differential conditioning (Siegel, 2003). As mentioned, the types of reinforcement are either positive or negative, and operate on the results of specific crimes or random acts. Rewarding behaviors plainly urges such action to be repeated, while punishment often deters those offenders from repeating their same mistakes. Parenting practices, social groups, schools, television, and the community are just a...

    Corporate crime, Crime, Criminology 2763  Words | 7  Pages

  • Business Ethics and the Connection to Communication: Does the Truth Really Matter?

    convinced that corporate executives should be on pedestals, because they keep the country moving along. In my opinion, white-collar crime is vastly more destructive to society that regular street crime. When executives approve of the illegal dumping of pollution into the air or water that then causes environmental damage and eventually kills thousands of people, which should be a crime comparable to any mass serial killing and have an appropriate level of response from the authorities. There probably...

    Arianna Huffington, Business ethics, Corporate crime 2453  Words | 6  Pages

  • Corporate Criminal Liability Adn White-Collar Crime

    Corporate Criminal Liability and White-Collar Crime Glory Finley Nur Kanburoglu Patrina Mohabir Rebecca Saxon Julie Stoltz Suzanne Witkowski University of Phoenix BUS 421: Business Law Mark Goodman June 1, 2009 Corporate Criminal Liability and White-Collar Crime White-collar crimes are non-violent criminal actions done through a business operation. These types of crimes usually do not affect one particular person, but a large number of individuals such as employees and investors....

    Accounting scandals, Crime, Criminal law 3093  Words | 9  Pages

  • CJR ASSIGNMENT 1 WHITE COLLAR CRIMES

     White Collar Crimes John E. Brown Strayer University CRJ 105- Crime and Criminal Behavior Professor Deborah S. White April 26, 2014 White Collar Crimes Introduction: This paper will explain why the topic of White Collar Crime needs to be researched and what actions should be taken, while during the research. White Collar crimes has the power to win election, gain public trust, influence the press and give a person the impression that he or she can continue to lie so they can...

    Accounting scandals, Crime, Criminology 553  Words | 4  Pages

  • environmental crime

     Environmental White Collar Crime Siva Sankara Reddy Pulagam Wilmington University MAJ 6610 Linda A. Rinaldi Environmental White Collar Crime Introduction Now a days, Environmental safety has become the...

    Criminology, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Hazardous waste 1187  Words | 6  Pages

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