• History of Art Dq
    has remarried. Her new love is the prime and only suspect in his Father’s death, and he is having a difficult time deciphering how and what needs to be done. He is drowning so in his sorrow that he no longer wants to live. “To die, to sleep” is commented more than one time. • What does Hamlet refer...
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  • Metaphor in Hamlet
    because he does not know what awaits him on the other side. Hamlet refers to death as "the undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler returns." He fears death as an unknown and possibly terrible thing. Hamlet decides that it is better "bear those ills we have than fly to others that we...
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  • Hamlet, the Social and Psychol
    ; (3.1.70-71) but “the dread of something after death, the undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler returns” (3.1.86-88). Hamlet has now attacked the course of the unknown after death. Through death, Hamlet states the end of the miseries of life but that the dread of after death...
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  • Hamlet essay
    natural shocks that flesh is heir to” (3.1.70-71) but “the dread of something after death, the undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler returns” (3.1.86-88). Hamlet has now attacked the course of the unknown after death. Through death, Hamlet states that one finds the end of the miseries...
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  • Shakespeare's quotes
    many torments, he is unsure what death may bring (the dread of something after death). He can't be sure what death has in store; it may be sleep but in perchance to dream he is speculating that it is perhaps an experience worse than life. Death is called the undiscovered country from which no...
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  • A Look at Hamlet Through His Soliloquies: His Metamorphosis
    we have shuffled off this mortal coil[?]" (III. i. 73-74); he wonders what will happen in "the undiscovered country from whose bourn/ No traveler returns" (III. i. 87-88). Therefore, "conscience does make cowards (III. i. 91) because we don't want to know what we will experience in death. If we...
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  • Identity
    scorns” of time, the “undiscovered country” of the afterlife. He is about to lose his identity since he is insane and can not think properly. He just talks and doesn’t take an action. “words,words,words” says Hamlet and describes his situation well. He has to decide what he should do and try to get...
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  • Hsc Hamlet
    whose bourn no traveller returns...and makes us rather bear those ills we have.” METAPHOR of the afterlife as “undiscovered country” highlights these uncertainties and fears surrounding what death entails, specifically by exploring this possibility that death may be worse than the troubles of life...
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  • To Be Or Not To Be
    communicated with him So he does know something of this “undiscovered country” 25 No traveller returns, puzzles the will, 26 And makes us rather bear those ills we have [End of section 2] 27 Than fly to others that we know not of? 28 Thus conscience does make cowards of us all, 29 And...
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  • Hamlet
    country” which refers to heaven. Hamlet mentions the undiscovered country when he is facing death by arrows and facing a “sea of trouble” this outrageous attack brought him to the point where he now looks death in the face while visualizing the potential of his fate. The afterlife is looming and...
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  • Hamlet Essay
    revealed by the metaphor of the after-life as the “puzzles” of an “undiscovered country”. Furthermore, Hamlet’s personal disarray can be seen in his language in Acts One and Two. For example, reflecting on his mother’s sexual appetite, Hamlet says, “she would hang on him as if increase of appetite had...
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  • Shakespeare’s Brilliant Use of Symbolism
    confronted with death, and his uncertainties as to the conditions of the existence of an afterlife (Rogers, 10). In his “to be, or not to be” soliloquy Hamlet questions as to whether it is worth it to live or die. He refers to death as some sort of dream that may come. He uses the reference of a dream to...
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  • What Is the Significance of Hamlet's Soliloquies?
    thinks, but exactly why he holds the emotions he does and why he behaves in a particular way is something that even Hamlet himself fails to understand. This is what troubles him – the fact that he is unable to truly get to grips with his own emotional state and complexity is something that causes him a...
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  • Messages in Shakespeare's Works
    they are afraid of something dreadful after death. Death is the undiscovered country from which no visitor ever returns, which makes us wonder about the answers to our many questions about the afterlife. Hamlet says that the fear of death makes us all cowards and our natural ability to be bold...
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  • Hamlet key soliloquies analysis
    . What is being said – The ideas How it is being said – The language Hamlet is terribly affected by the ghost/Questions: Does he come from heaven or hell? He almost loses balance which shows the extent of his agitation. Distracted...
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  • Hamlet - To Be or Not To Be
    of war within the scene. Hamlet says; ‘The undiscovered country from whose bourn no travellers return’ This can be analyzed to be a metaphor for Hamlet himself, the undiscovered country to be an unknown land that he may travel to in death but also, the land from which the men travel to go to war...
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  • Strong Emotions in Williams Shakespeare's 'Hamlet'
    not find death quite so intimidating. Of course, further along in the soliloquy, Hamlet begins to have his doubts. Some of Hamlet’s doubts can be found by studying the diction of the play. The land that men travel to after death is referred to as the ‘undiscovered country,’ a term sufficiently ‘scary...
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  • Ap English Modernism
    , paratexts, or samplings • Hamlet realizes that it is the dread of change and of the unknown, the “undiscovered country” after death that leads us to accept, or at least bear, the many pains and wrongs of our present situations. • When Hamlet passes up the change to kill Claudius – while many...
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  • taking the ghost's word
    when Hamlet observes, “. . . the dread of something after death, the undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler returns . . .” (3.1.80-82). Therefore, unlike the scathing skepticism of post-Cartesian philosophers like Nietzsche and Derrida who indiscriminately dissect almost all attempts at...
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  • Existentialism essay
    is no way of being sure whether they exist or not. He believes that is everyone's fear in life. People fear what they do not know. Hamlet is no exception to that and also a dread at the fact that he does not know what life after death is. In addition Hamlet remarks, "But that the dread of something...
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