• What Is Your Understanding of the Basic Elements or Principles Inherent to Psychodynamic Counselling as Expressed by Lawrence Spurling in “an Introduction to Psychodynamic Counselling?”
    differs from other approaches in psychotherapy as it recognises and puts emphasis on the concept of transference. This defining feature is a form of projection in which feelings, behaviours and thoughts from another are transferred onto the counsellor. This can become a tool for understanding client’s...
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  • Psychodynamic Counselling Concept
    assumptions about them based on the need to avoid threat. Psychodynamic counselling encourages the client to recognise and accept the troubling attribute, a process called ‘reintrojection’. To engage in projection a defence mechanism called, ‘splitting’, is used when one is finding it too threatening to...
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  • Briefly Outline the Key Features of a Cognitive-Behavioural Approach to Counselling
    onto the counsellor. Transference enables the counsellor to make clients aware of such projections so the client can recognise this and prevent it happening in future relationships. Transference is a feature of psychodynamic methodology, useful in determining clients’ histories that aid counsellors...
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  • ‘the Client Comes to the Counsellor Because of Internal Conflicts That Prevent Him from Enjoying Life……… but the Counsellor Also Needs the Client.’
    which individuation (recognizing oneself as separate from the other) can take place’ (Gray, 1994: p10) I will now discuss transference. Transference is an essential part of psychodynamic counselling and tells the counsellor a lot about the client’s needs, and how they have experienced past...
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  • The Application of Psychodynamic Theories Based on the Frances Ashe Case Study
    thereby strengthening her weak ego. As a counsellor, looking at the Freudian concept of Psychodynamic counselling, evidence can be gathered from ‘free association’, dreams, and slips and of tongue and transference to build a picture of the client. The conscious thoughts, feelings and behaviours...
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  • Psychotherapy
    , rationalisation, repression, reaction formation, displacement, introjection and undoing. Psychotic defences involve denial, dissociation, regression, projection, projective identification and compensation (ibid.). Freud originally discovered the term transference as the process of a patient...
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  • Counselling Psychology (Description and Evaluation of the Psychoanalytic Theories of Counselling and Techniques Using the)
    for an extremely difficult situation in which the counsellor has a huge amount of influence, which is necessary but requires care and restraint (Sue & Sue, 2007). Freud initially believed transference was a hurdle in counselling. However, he eventually recognized that transference is a...
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    have their ultimate origins in childhood. The client may not be consciously aware of the true motives or impulses behind his or her actions The use in counselling and therapy of interpretation of the transference relationship Personality development Energy develops through 5 psychosextual...
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  • The 10 Commandments of Positive Thinking
    the client to develop projections and transferences towards the therapist without being influenced by the therapist’s responses or body language. Psychodynamic therapy also embraces the idea that the therapist displays empathy, acceptance and understanding of the client but does not include the idea...
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  • Mentoring
    Association for Counselling. Family System Projections Home Relationships Transgenerational Projections Cultural Projections Family of Origin Dynamics Self Work Relationships Creative Space Transference to Mentor Mentor Mentor’s Dynamics Figure 1 The Mentor as a Change Agent...
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  • Counseling
    Approaches to Counselling (Theoretical Perspectives) Subject Code Number :ACTP-101 Credits: 3.07 Expected learning outcomes To understand the historical information related to the development of the various theoretical systems and the individuals responsible for its development To...
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  • Counselling Theories
    that have restricted them emotionally. Understanding the value and role of transference and understanding how the overuse of ego defences, both in the counselling relationship and in daily life can keep client’s from functioning effectively. (p. 89) Limitations Corey (2009, p.90) stated that...
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  • Miss
    results from the realization of the discrepancy between the person?s ideal self and his actual self. One way of coping with anxiety or psychic pain or conflict is the use of defense mechanisms (e.g. regression, repression, displacement, reaction formation, projection etc.) (Brown & Pedder, 1991). That...
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  • Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and Counselling
     Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and Counselling Psychodynamic therapy (or Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy as it is sometimes called) is a general name for therapeutic approaches which try to get the patient to bring to the surface their true feelings, so that they can experience them and understand...
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  • Relective Psychotherapy Case Study
    Introduction The setting for this case was a counselling service in the private sector. The client had been referred directly to me, as described below. My usual theoretical approach to counselling practice is also relevant context for this case. A humanistic framework underpins my work, with...
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  • introduction to Psychodynamic Therapies
    Dinesh Bhugra, Models of Psychopathology, Maidenhead: Open University Press;2004 Grant J. AND Crawley J., Transference and Projection, Maidenhead: Open University Press;2002 (pg 48-49) Jacobs M., Psychodynamic Counselling in Action (4th Edition), London: Sage; 2010 Kernberg O. F.,Selzer Michael...
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  • Freud and anna freud defences
    them. The purpose of counselling is not to leave the client defenceless but to give up archaic defences for something which is more flexible and supports the client’s development in their life going forward. By working with transference and counter transference and making interpretations about the...
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  • Freud
    anxiety and prevent the ego from being overwhelmed. The defences are repression, denial, reaction formation, projection, displacement, rationalisation, sublimation, regression, introjection, identification and compensation. Defences deny or distort reality and operate on the unconscious level.p64 65...
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  • freud
    this theory. 1.4 EXPLAIN HOW THE CHOSEN MODEL WOULD INFORM THE PRACTICE OF A QUALIFIED TRAINED COUNSELLOR. The qualified trained counsellor in psychodynamic counselling will address issues of repressed material, look at defences being displayed, the transference towards the counsellor i.e. an...
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  • Cnps 365 Midterm 1 Notes
    • Typical defense mechanisms: Repression, Denial, Reaction formation, Projection, Displacement, Rationalization, Sublimation, Regression, Introjection, Identification, Compensation • Freuds psychosexual stages of development: oral stage, anal stage, phallic, stage • Oral stage – inability to trust...
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