• The Influence of Locke’s Social Contract on the Declaration of Independence
    ideas of social contract theorist John Locke are very much evident in the Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson. Unlike the chaotic and brutal scenario (of the “State of Nature” that creates the necessity for the “Social Contract”) described by Hobbes, Locke claimed that there are rights that...
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  • The Inevitability of the American Revolution
    the written works of Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and other Founding Fathers of the United States[8], Locke was coined the Father of Liberalism.[9] Locke stated that In a natural state all people were equal and independent, and everyone had a natural right to defend his “Life, health...
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  • Hobbes and Lock Views on Property
    differently with different point of views. John Locke (1632 – 1704) and Karl Marx (1818 – 1883) had very strong and also very diverse views of property and its importance in the human society. John Locke saw private property as the basis of freedom and liberty. Locke believed that people were born free...
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  • Reaction Paper
    John Locke After reading John Locke,” An Essay concerning human understanding” (1975) it quite clear to me that he was stating that ideas are innate and we as humans are born with knowledge and we carry that knowledge with us throughout our years. Locke stated “That there are truths imprinted...
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  • Psychological Egoism
    about the Enlightenment through the influenced the works of John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Alexander Pope, and are reflected in their works; "An Essay Concerning Human Understanding," "Leviathan," and "An Essay On Man." (Tenorio 3) John Locke (1632-1704), the English moral, political and natural philosopher...
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  • Discuss the American Revolution as a European Movement
    Hobbes and John Locke both had great influence on American thinkers, with Locke being the more influential as Hobbes' solution was not the thing the American founders wanted. Locke was far more optimistic, stating that all humans were capable and that they strove for the betterment of the world. John Locke...
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  • Briefly Explain What Is Meant by the “Scientific Revolution” That Took Place in Seventeenth Century Europe, and How It Marked a Departure from Ancient and Medieval Philosophy.
    Hobbes and John Locke regarding natural law and government, and discuss the influences that their works had on the development of political thought both during their own time and later? The two main political philosophers during the seventeenth century were Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. Hobbes is...
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  • Comparison of Enlightenment Thinkers
    discrepancies many had against his views and contrasts with popular opinion, he was soon overshadowed by another philosopher, John Locke, in the 17th century. John Locke, another political philosopher who came about in the 17th century, worked to discover natural laws of politics. He provided...
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  • Absolutism vs. Constitutionalism
    wars began in 1562 and were partly religious and partly political in nature. The massacre of St. Bartholomew’s Day (August 24, 1572) refers to: A. John the Terrible’s slaughter of the Burgundians B. the Spanish massacre of the Calvinists in Ghent C. the defeat of the Spanish Armada D. the slaughter...
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  • John Locke
    John Locke John Locke was a British philosopher, Oxford academic and medical researcher. His association with Anthony Ashley Cooper (the First Earl of Shaftesbury) led him to then become a government official who was responsible for collecting information about trade and colonies. It also led him...
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  • Comparing Hobbes and Locke
    bDerek Taylor POSC 402-01 14 Feb. 2013 Paper No. 1 Social contract theorists Thomas Hobbes and John Locke agree that legitimate government comes only from the mutual consent of those governed. Although both were empiricists, the ways by which they came to their conclusions differed wildly, and perhaps...
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  • Rousseau and individualism
    driving force in the way each of us think in our daily lives. During the time of Rousseau these ideas we just taking off, with thinkers like Hobbes and Locke were carrying the idea forward. However, what Rousseau provided in his works, in particular piece The Social Contract challenged those notions of individualism...
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  • Locke & Human Nature
    In The Second Treatise of Government, Locke defines political power, discusses the inalienable birth-rights of man, and the need for both in the formation of a legitimate government. John Locke's The Second Treatise of Government defines a legitimate government in relation to the protection of inalienable...
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  • Politics
    it needed to have the consent of the governed. 3. (a) The distinction between liberty and license or true liberty and corrupt liberty is simple. Locke explains liberty as the state of nature and as a state of equality in which no one has power over another, and people are free to do want they want...
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  • John Locke Presentation
    219E WEEK TEN APPLE  KEYNOTE PRESENTATION Friday, December 3, 2010 JOHN LOCKE 1632 1704 Friday, December 3, 2010 AN ESSAY CONCERNING HUMAN UNDERSTANDING (1689) BOOK II, CHAPTER XX & CHAPTER XXI UPTO § 46. John Locke wrote on many subjects. ‘An Essay Concerning Human Understanding’ is mostly...
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  • Political Theories
    giving credence to the belief in eternal souls and immaterial spirits, as well as many tenets of Catholicism, especially the papacy. John Locke John Locke FRS (pron.: /ˈlɒk/; 29 August 1632 – 28 October 1704), widely known as the Father of Classical Liberalism,[2][3][4] was an English philosopher...
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  • The State of Nature
    Nature is defined as, “The situation in which no state exists and no one exerts political power.” Three well-known philosophers, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean Jacques Rousseau, accept this definition for the state of nature, but each philosopher envisions the state of nature in their own way....
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  • In the Eyes of John Locke and Thomas Hobbes
    In the Eyes of John Locke and Thomas Hobbes After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 there was certainly a need for increased government/police power to provide and keep peace and security throughout the nation. Yet with this increase a suppression of individual civil liberties is inherently...
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  • Locke's Second Treatise of Government
    John Locke's Two Treatises of Government (1690) are essays which had an important influence on the development of modern concepts of democracy by arguing that all individuals have natural rights to freedom, independence, and political equality. The treatises deny that any individual has the right to...
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  • The American Enlightenment
    government. The man that started this beloved period was named John Locke. The ideas of John Locke and the Enlightenment Period caused a few philosophers and people who were outspoken about freedoms and rights to shape the American government. Locke was raised in Britain, and across the English Channel most...
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