• The Relationship Between Sugar and Slavery in the Early Modern Period.
    died out under this sytem, a story which will be shown to often repeat itself in the dirty trail of sugar and slaves. As an institution African slavery was first introduced to the Caribbean in 1502. In that year the Catholic Monarchs of Spain, Ferdinand and Isabella, granted their approval to the...
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  • Caribbean Studies
    Caribbean plate identify the Antilles, the windward islands and the leewad silands * * Institutions * * * Social Stratification * * This refers to the way a society ranks social groups in terms of status, wealth and prestige. Historically, the systems of social...
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  • The extent to which the environment has historically shaped the Caribbean economies..
    being replaced by sugar. With the introduction of sugar plantations into the Caribbean, Caribbean economies experienced a boom, with several distinct changes occurring, namely increase in land holdings, population growth and change in the ethnic composition of the population. Menard, in Sweet...
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  • Cover Page
    , characteristics, and development of Caribbean slave societies. Patterson argued that Jamaica during slavery had been a ‘monstrous distortion of human society’ because the planters created a system that allowed little space for institutions that might have allowed for social stability and cultural...
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  • Europeans in Jamaica
    permanent settlement through generous land grants. In 1664 Sir Thomas Modyford, a sugar plantation and slave owner in Barbados (a Caribbean island of the Lesser Antilles chain), was appointed governor of Jamaica. He brought 1,000 English settlers and black slaves with him from Barbados. Modyford...
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  • Classical Athens and Han China
    most accurate? Competition from English, French, and Dutch plantations in the Caribbean undercut the Brazilian sugar industry. 17. Which of the following statements concerning Portugal's economy is most accurate? The negative balance of trade with England caused an outflow of bullion and...
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  • Plantation Socciety
    in the diversity of Protestant denominations as well as the spread of Catholicism. Slavery and its Contribution to Caribbean Civilization The introduction of African slaves to sugar plantations in the Caribbean has indelibly influenced the racial and ethnic compositions of the Caribbean...
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  • Latin America
    occupied part of Brazil until expelled in 1654. Meanwhile, the Dutch, English, and French had established sugar plantation colonies in the Caribbean. The resulting competition lowered sugar prices and raised the cost of slaves. Brazil lost its position as predominant sugar producer, but exploring...
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  • Caribbean Studie
    plantations. The Africans were kidnapped from West-Africa and forced to work on Sugar plantations in the Caribbean. Under this system the profits were then repatriated to Europe and used to promote manufacturing and industrial strength in Europe. Slavery can be considered to be a total...
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  • Shanette
    problems of the plantations and the local governments in the Caribbean during the nineteenth century, but it enabled the sugar plantations to weather the difficulties of the transition from slave labor. The new immigrants further pluralized the culture, the economy, and the societies. The East...
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  • Chris
    and Africa was seen as the ideal location from which this labour would be sought. * African slavery became a total institution justified through race, determining all aspects of social life in the Caribbean. * African slavery facilitated the development of the Plantation Society in the...
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  • Jamaican History
    changed with the British Parliament's abolishment of the slave trade in 1833. Freed slaves became independent farmers or employees of surviving sugar plantations. The government also changed from an elected British assembly to a governor–controlled crown colony enacted in 1866 and run for 75 years...
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  • british empire in the caribbean
     The British Empire in the Carribbean was founded on the production of sugar on plantations worked by black slaves. Slavery took off on a massive scale when Portugal, Holland, England and France all began the commercial cultivation of tobacco and sugar in their colonies. These crops demanded a...
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  • cape
    -existing Caribbean societies into slave societies and had a myriad of other effects: 118. Effects of the Slave Trade• The slave trade was directly tied to the need for labour therefore large plantation economies tended to have large African populations ex. English, French and Dutch• The Spanish...
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  • Miss
    women carried a fighting spirit with them across the Atlantic and into their life of slavery on British Caribbean Plantations. The most important thing which the master expected of the slave was his or her labor: the most damaging things which the slaves could do to the master was to work slowly, to...
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  • BBC - History - British History in depth: Slavery and Economy in Barbados
    these individuals were re-exported to other slave owning colonies, either in the West Indies or to North America. However, and this is especially true for the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, the high mortality rate among slaves working on the sugar plantations necessitated a constant input...
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  • History Sba
    that the success of the British West Indian colonies was dependant upon the success of the then highly demanded sugar crop. [pic] Fig: 4 Field slaves working on a sugar plantation The primary motive for slavery in the Caribbean was the need for wealth. Slavery...
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  • 6b Notes- Physics
    there was a great demand for a sweetener in Europe. The cultivation of sugar cane needed extensive labour as this was a plantation crop.: To satisfy this demand the Europeans turned to Africa and thus began the Atlantic Slave Trade. This brought about a dramatic change into the Caribbean society...
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  • Caribbean Studies
    accepted, as there was a great demand for a sweetener in Europe. The cultivation of sugar cane needed extensive labour as this was a plantation crop.: To satisfy this demand the Europeans turned to Africa and thus began the Atlantic Slave Trade. This brought about a dramatic change into the Caribbean...
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  • Effects of the 1884 Beet Sugar Crisis on British Guiana and Barbados
    ). ---------- "The Role of the Barbados Mutual Life Assurance Society During the International Sugar Crisis of the Late Nineteenth Century". Paper Presented at the Twelfth Conference of the Association of Caribbean Historians, St. Augustine, U.W.I., 30 March – 4 April 1980. KEY, Lesley. "Village Pattern and...
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