• Comparing and Applying Theories of Development
    the demands of the id.” (Witt & Mossler, 2010) There are also a few similarities between Freud’s Psychoanalytic Theory and Piaget’s Cognitive Stage Theory. Once again, just like Erickson, Freud and Piaget agreed that development occurs in stages and both of them mostly focus on child development...
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  • Theories of Cognitive Development
    characteristic of his stage theory is that they are universal; the stages will work for everyone in the world regardless of their differences (except their age, of course, which is what the stages are based on!) Piaget acknowledged that there is an interaction between a child and the environment, and this is...
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  • Developmental Theories
    out how children master ideas and then translate them to speech. Sigmund Freud and Erik Erikson are also often compared because Erickson was once a part Freud’s circle and is known for modifying and extending Freudian theory by emphasizing the influence of society on the developing personality...
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  • The Developmental Theories of Jean Piaget, Sigmund Freud, and Erik Erikson
    the crisis and conflict that developed in the next stage. There are several similarities and differences between the three theories. Similarly all three break development down into stages. Erikson's greatest innovation was to form not five stages of development, as Sigmund Freud had done with his...
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  • Theories of Child Development
    discussed have similarities, and differences. Next we will evaluate some of these similarities, and differences in the theories. One of the most major similarities between the three developmental theories, are the use of “stages” in each. All three theories have at least three stages, all beginning...
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  • Controversial Development
    this stage of development coincides with Freud’s oral stage. Although Piaget goes into more detail and breaks each stage into segments. Some of his theory directly builds on the oral stage. Piaget and Freud both agree that morality begins to surface in personalities between the ages seven and...
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  • Theories of Child Development
    similarities between the three developmental theories is the use of “stages” in each. All three theories have at least three stages, all begin at birth and all reference the early reflex of sucking. Freud’s, Erikson’s and Piaget’s theories are similar in that around age six children are focused on...
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  • Compare and Contrast Freud Versus Erickson
    still influenced by Freud, which caused some similarities in their theories. . Even though Erikson had eight stages compared to Freud’s five, you can see that Erikson's first five stages hold some similarities to Freud’s five stages. The first similarity that can be seen is that each stage in both...
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  • Educational Psychology
    believes, represents a never –ending attempt to achieve a state of equilibrium or balance between individual and environment. Piaget calls that the equilibration factor. An example of equilibration: feeling energetic on a bright spring afternoon, you toss a ball, go jogging or bike-riding, or play some...
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  • Difference Between Freud vs. Erikson
    , since they both are well known development theories. I will provide enough information about both and explain the differences of each, as well. First off, Freud had inspired Erickson who had theories that were in a number of ways different than Freud’s. Freud and Erickson have similarities and...
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  • child psychology
    we think they are. There are many different development theories available that states different concepts of human development, but the three main theories that are mainly known are from Sigmund Freud, Erik Erickson, and Jean Piaget. Although many believe that their theories are old and outdated...
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  • Moral Development
    of the same sex parent. Interestingly, Freud believed that males have stronger superegos because of the intense castration anxiety felt during the Oedipal conflict of the Phallic Stage. This anxiety leads to stronger identification and therefore stronger, more punitive, superegos. Erickson also...
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  • psychology
    was incorrect in his proposition of psychosexual sages, instead proposing that individuals develop through psychosocial stages.” (O'Brien 2013, p22). This means instead of focusing his theory on psychosexual analysis like Freud, his theory focused on psychosocial because Erickson unlike Freud...
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  • Child Development Theorists
    , n.d.). Erikson’s Psychosocial Theory of Development attributes its foundation to Freud’s Psychosexual Theory. He hypothesized that his theory would fill in the holes with what Freud was incapable of fully explaining. Erickson observed factions of Native American juveniles to assist in...
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  • Theories of Development
    helps to explain phenomena and facilitate predictions.” (Santrock, 2013, p.21) Having an understanding of child development is important for implementing developmentally appropriate practices. As educators, understanding the theories of Sigmund Freud, Erik Erikson, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky will...
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  • Theories of Development
    others are independent. Often theories are credible whereas others cause skepticism. There are many contributors to the world of psychology with different views and beliefs about human development.  Psychodynamic Theory  Sigmund Freud was one of the most influential contributors to the field of...
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  • Developmental Stages Paper
    between two people; and the field of attachment has inspired many theories and theorists in the research of attachment. Sigmund Freud for example, believed that a stable mother-child relationship (attachment) is very important to development (Sigelman & Rider, 2003). Interestingly, many theorists...
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  • Psychology
    Logotherapy (1969) Anna Freud The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence (1936) Sigmund Freud The Interpretation of Dreams (1900) Howard Gardner Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983) Daniel Gilbert Stumbling on Happiness (2006) Malcolm Gladwell Blink: The Power of Thinking...
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  • Theories of Development
    their children grow up. I think it is a big mistake to assume or say it’s the norm for a child to develop properly or fail just because of their environment or parents financial status. Sigmund Freud, Erickson, Piaget, and many others have many theories on development. One thing that is perfectly...
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  • Freud Erikson and Piaget
    positive contribution to society. Unlike Freud and Erikson and Piaget believed in the cognitive-developmental approach. Jean Piaget’s (1896-1980) work was based around the way in which children adapted and learnt about the world and how to live. He believed that accommodation, being the theory...
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