"Shooting An Elephant Tone" Essays and Research Papers

  • Shooting An Elephant Tone

    Analysis of “Shooting an Elephant” In the essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell writes about his experiences as a British police officer in Burma, and compares it to the nature of imperialism. Orwell hates his job because imperialism has negatively affected him, as well as others around him. Orwell’; the white man is being treated very disrespectfully by the Burmese. Giving him a reason to hate his job as well as the British Empire; the root of everything. The situation of shooting of an elephant...

    British Empire, Burma, Emotion 1203  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Jessica DeBruhl Terry McCammond English Composition 111 6 February 2013 WP#2 First draft Pressures In this essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell, comes face to face with the effects of peer pressure and imperialism. While under constant scrutiny by the people who did not want to be ruled, he felt “stuck between the hatred of the empire I serve and my rage against the evil-spirited little beasts who tried to make my job impossible” (Orwell). George finds himself in an impossible situation...

    British Empire, British Raj, Burma 1243  Words | 4  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Shooting an Elephant: Imperialism When the word“dictator” comes to mind, humans are dolorous and empathetic. A great proof of this fact was observed during the early parts of the 20th century when oppression and iron fisted rule was established as a social normalcy in much of the world. The oppressive days of totalitarianism have passed and were marked by the death of the infamous and grandiose era of imperialism. Nonetheless, it left a bad imprint upon the countries and people that were involved...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 1253  Words | 4  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” “Shooting an Elephant” is an essay written by George Orwell and published in 1936 (Orwell 66). Orwell was born June 25, 1903, as Eric Arthur Blair and passed away January 21, 1950, in India (“George Orwell Biography”). Orwell was known for his journals, novels, and essays published about his own political views (“George Orwell Biography”). Orwell traveled to Burma after not doing good enough in school to earn a scholarship and decided to join the imperial...

    British Empire, British Raj, Burma 938  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    In George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant”, Orwell is presented with a task that causes him a great deal of stress as he battles with his internal conflict throughout the story. Orwell has mixed feelings after he kills the elephant. He feels wrong for killing the elephant because he feels that there could have been a more peaceful solution and killing it will bring more harm than good. He also feels that he killed it just because of his own pride. Although killing the elephant may seem wrong to Orwell...

    Authority, Burma, George Orwell 1225  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    S. Zamb. November 29, 2001 “Shooting and elephant” Erick Arthur Blair better known as George Orwell was born in Mohitari, India on June 25, 1903. India into a family of the “lower-upper middle class. George Orwell’s education brought him to England where he was unable to win a scholarship to continue his studies. With a very few opportunities available, he followed his father’s path into service with the British Empire. Orwell joined the Indian Imperial Police from 1922 to 1927. When...

    British Empire, British Raj, Burma 934  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    2012 Shooting an Elephant In society, we are sometimes obligated to make a decision on the spot, without looking back or looking at any options around us. It may mean you have to make a decision for a big group or have to make a decision for yourself; in this case, both of those options weren’t good ones for the man who killed the elephant. In “Shooting an Elephant” George Orwell narrates a story about his experience as a police officer in Burma that had killed an extreme elephant. Being...

    Burma, Decision making, George Orwell 1098  Words | 3  Pages

  • shooting an elephant

    George Orwell, “Shooting an Elephant”; Adam Hochschild, King Leopold’s Ghost (excerpt); Queen Liliuokalani, Hawaii’s Story (excerpt) A. “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell 1. How does Orwell express his disillusionment with imperialism in this essay? 2. What do you think he means by this sentence?: “One day something happened which in a roundabout way was enlightening. It was a tiny incident in itself, but it gave me a better glimpse than I had had before of the real nature of imperialism...

    British Empire, Colonialism, Congo Free State 960  Words | 4  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Joe Portaro Scott Tenney Project 2b "Shooting an elephant" The main purpose of George Orwell’s story “shooting an elephant” is not to show how or explain how to actually kill an elephant; his work demonstrates how people will react to a imperialistic situation, will they follow the crowd or will they hold their own beliefs and not let others change them. In Orwell’s case he had no intention of killing the elephant but because the crowd behind him was one he wanted, instead of being made fun of...

    Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant 1279  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Shooting an elephant written by George Orwell brings to light the evil of imperialism. Being a police officer in the lower Burma, Orwell hated his job. The reason was because the people in Burma ridiculed, insulted and laughed at him whenever they felt safe to do so. Orwell opposed imperialism, and thus was able to feel the hatred of the people of Burma, but still resented them. The story starts with Orwell receiving a phone call about a tame elephant destroying bazaar. He carried with him an old...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 1125  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting An Elephant

     Shooting an Elephant Essay Courage is being able to drown out the voices of others and stay true to one’s own morals. In the memoir Shooting An Elephant, George Orwell describes his time as a British Colonial police officer in Burma. While he is there he develops hatred for the British Empire and his actions, throughout the memoir are contrary to his beliefs. There are several events that take place in Shooting an Elephant that reveal Orwell’s character flaws. He lacks the ability to make...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 1386  Words | 6  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    to Vladimir Lenin. George Orwell immediately begins the essay ''Shooting an Elephant" by claiming his perspective on British Imperialism, and how this imperialism affected himself, his empire, and the Burma people. Though George Orwell is a British officer himself at the time in Burma , he claims that he is fully against the oppressors , who at the time are the British. His personal experience, that he writes about with the elephant is metaphorical to imperialism and how he views the social issue...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 1885  Words | 5  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    compels its followers to act irrationally in order to keep appearances. Facing an impenetrable tyranny, the narrator, George Orwell, realizes his own oppression is not a product of his enemies but his own internal conflicts. In the essay “Shooting an Elephant”, George Orwell narrates his experience serving as a sub-divisional police officer for the British Empire in Moulmein, Burma. Orwell uses metaphors to represent his feelings on imperialism, intimate struggles with his own personal morals,...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 1120  Words | 3  Pages

  • Rhetorical Analysis of "Shooting an Elephant"

    Rhetorical Analysis of “Shooting an Elephant” In George Orwell's short story, “Shooting an Elephant,” the narrator, a young European sub-divisional police officer states, “that when the white man turns tyrant it is his own freedom that he destroys.” This realization of British imperialism comes to him one day when he is pressured into shooting and killing a “peacefully eating,” elephant. Orwell's tone in this story is rather blunt and candid. The narrator is often speaking on how he doesn't...

    Burma, George Orwell, Imperialism 1368  Words | 4  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    The story that my evaluation will be based on is Shooting an Elephant written in 1936. The author George Orwell was born in 1903 in India to a British officer raised in England. He attended Eton College, which introduced him to England's middle and upper classes. He was denied a scholarship, which led him to become a police officer for the Indian Imperial in 1922. He served in Burma until resigning in 1927 due to the lack of respect for the justice of British Imperialism in Burma and India. He was...

    Animal Farm, Burma, George Orwell 1383  Words | 3  Pages

  • shooting an elephant

    Trystan Tomco Mr. Stone English 110 12/03/13 Shooting an Elephant Essay George Orwell wroteShooting an Elephant” to teach readers about imperialism and its effects on not only those ruled but also those charged with maintaining order above them. Orwell’s narrator is a British colonial official stationed in Burma who is charged with keeping the local populace from rioting. The officer speaks of how he is frightened by the Burmans and even by his own people rulers. Fear is one of the...

    Affect, British Empire, Burma 809  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    English 12. Evgeniya Belim . “Shooting an elephant” What would you do when faced with a crowd expected of you to act? InShooting an Elephant” George Orwell speaks of human behavior in a critical situation, under the pressure of several factors such as social, political, spiritual factors. The author told the story that took place in Moulmain, in Lower Burma with a sub-divisional police officer during the time when Burma was a British colony. That was a difficult times for both countries. I dare...

    Burma, Decision making, George Orwell 1373  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Shooting an elephant Author: George Orwell   BIOGRAPHY OF GEORGE ORWELL George Orwell's three major books of travel writing--Down and Out in Paris and London (1933), The Road to Wigan Pier (1937), and Homage to Catalonia (1938)--revived the tradition of excursionary literature as social and political analysis. "Into Unknown England" books were initiated by reform-minded Victorian and Edwardian authors. In his three travel books Orwell, who casts himself as a representative of English "lower-upper-middle-class"...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 1331  Words | 4  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Julien Combes Natasha Rebry Writing 009 20th November 2011 “Shooting an Elephant“: Orwell’s combat against imperialismShooting an Elephant” is an essay written by George Orwell, first published in the journal New Writing in 1936. In this essay, the author tells his own story about when he was working as a police officer for the Indian Imperial Police in Burma. His five years of experience in the Indian Imperial Police allowed him to have a good understanding of what exactly the “real...

    British Empire, British Raj, Burma 1200  Words | 4  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell The short story, Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell was written about Orwell’s experience in the early Twentieth Century. At that time India was ruled the British. While he was there, he had to do something that had caused some ethical conflicts in him. Orwell’s job was to kill an elephant that had ran rampant in lust throughout a village in Burma. “It had already destroyed somebody's bamboo hut, killed a cow and raided some fruit-stalls and devoured the...

    British Empire, Burma, Capital punishment 1219  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    DISCUSS ORWELL'S USE OF PERSUASIVE TOOLS SUCH AS, SYMBOLISM, METAPHORS AND IRONY IN THIS ESSAY AND EXPLAIN HOW HE USES EACH OF THESE TO CONVEY HIS ARGUMENT OR MESSAGE In the extract, "Shooting An Elephant" Orwell conveys his message through the use of various persuasive tools. He wants the reader to identify when somebody assumes power. This technique is used to show that the powerful are also a captive to the will of people they control. Everyone involved in the situation becomes affected. In...

    British Empire, Burma, Emotion 840  Words | 3  Pages

  • Response to Shooting an Elephant

    Orwell spent the next twenty years as a writer; the essay “Shooting an Elephant,” set in the Burma of the 1920s and written in 1936, is one of his most famous works. In the early twentieth century, Burma was still a colony of Britain but anti-imperialism protests and social movements developed very fast, causing “great tension between Burmese, Indians and English, between civilians and police” (Meyers 56). Orwell’s essay “Shooting an Elephant” is based on this historical tension. In this essay, Orwell...

    British Empire, Burma, Emotion 1558  Words | 4  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant: A Study Guide

    Shooting an Elephant Sarig T. Cohen George Orwell is the author of “Shooting an Elephant”, a short story that uses the small incident of the murder of an elephant to portray the horrors of British Imperialism. Due to the fact that George Orwell writes a short story in the form of an essay, it contains a thesis, which is the argument about the nature of imperialism. The great thing about George Orwell’s essay is that the theme is represented throughout the plot and can be analyzed from any...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 913  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant -Ra

    Leonard Morrow Christina Olson Writing Assignment 3 9 April 2013 Rhetorical Analysis: “Shooting an Elephant” In the essay entitled “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell writes, “In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people – the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me” (Orwell, pg#). In this exert, not only does Orwell succeed in setting the mood and foreshadowing events to come, but he also introduces us to a protagonist...

    Burma, Foreshadowing, George Orwell 910  Words | 3  Pages

  • An Analysis of George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

    Orwell’s autobiographical account of shooting and eventually killing an elephant presents the animal and its death sympathetically as it died a slow, painful death. Through the language, the author evokes sympathy towards the elephant and a slightly more complex feeling towards the author who, although he kills the elephant, suffers inwardly during the process and appears to be affected by the Burman crowd’s greed to strip the carcass. In the society Orwell lived in, hunting was common amongst...

    Death, Metaphor, Onomatopoeia 1353  Words | 4  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant Literary Analysis

    story “Shooting an Elephant,” demonstrates the total dangers of the unlimited authority a state has and the astounding presentment of “future dystopia”. In the story, Orwell finds himself to be in an intricate situation that involves an elephant. Not only does the fate of the elephant’s life lie in Orwell’s hands, he has an audience of people behind him cheering him on, making his decision much more difficult to make. Due to the vast crowd surrounding his thoughts, Orwell kills the elephant in the...

    Burma, Emotion, George Orwell 895  Words | 3  Pages

  • Essay on 'Shooting an Elephant'

    Essay on ‘Shooting an Elephant’ by George Orwell “And it was at this moment, as I stood there with the rifle in my hands, that I first grasped the hollowness, the futility of the white man’s dominion in the East.“ . This quotation from the short story “Shooting an Elephant” shows the impact of the British Empire on India during the colonial period. The main character, who is a British police officer, serving in Burma shows a big hatred to both sides. We follow him develop into shooting an Elephant...

    Antagonist, Burma, Character 1025  Words | 3  Pages

  • Imperialist Elephant Shooting

    Audience Analysis The target audience for this summary and response writing exercise over George Orwell's Shooting An Elephant would be the other individuals and the instructor of this online English Composition course. The majority of my core audience, minus the instructor, should be my fellow college students taking this course. Other than stating that the others who will be reading this piece vary in age, ethnicity, and overall life experience; I would be hard pressed to further describe my...

    Bamar, British Empire, Burma 1089  Words | 3  Pages

  • George Orwell's "Shooting a Elephant"

    English 121 115 Erica Holcomb 09/12/2012 “Shooting an Elephant” “Shooting an Elephant” is an essay by George Orwell in which he describes his experience of being called upon to shoot an aggressive elephant while working as a police officer in Burma. Because the locals expect him to do the job, he does so against his better judgment. The act of caving-in to the pressure he felt from the locals enlightens him to the underlying duties that come with being part of the imperialistic movement that...

    Burma, George Orwell, Hunting 997  Words | 3  Pages

  • Relationship in Shooting an Elephant

    SG Orwell's Relationship with the Burmese in “Shooting an Elephant” The relationship between Orwell and the Burmese in George Orwell's “Shooting an Elephant,” is a complex relationship filled with hatred. Regardless of Orwell's personal morals and beliefs on imperialism, he still upholds the duties of his job and has desire to show he is not in any shape or form inferior to any Burman, while the Burmese show nothing but ridicule and loathe for Orwell. This relationship shared between Orwell and...

    British Empire, Burma, George Orwell 848  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Symbolic Value in Shooting an Elephant

    In “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell presents a story in which he reluctantly kills an elephant. Orwell is a British police officer who is always teased by the Burmese, who see him as a representative of the British Empire but fail to realize that Orwell also opposes English occupation of Burma. One day, Orwell is called to investigate an accident in the marketplace involving a rampant elephant. Orwell borrows a rifle, which could bring down the elephant, from his friend. He hopes...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 801  Words | 5  Pages

  • "Shooting an Elephant" Essay

    Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell in 1936 Imperialism is “the creation and/or maintenance of an unequal economic, cultural, and territorial relationship, usually between states and often in the form of an empire, based on domination and subordination”[1]. During the British colonial period from the late 16th century to the 19th century, Britain assembled an empire which in 1922 held sway over a population of about 458 million people. The United Kingdom had several colonies, dominions, protectorates...

    British Empire, Colonialism, Empire 952  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant Summary

    My Interpretation of "Shooting An Elephant" By Christina Harry 06/19/2013 English Composition 111 "Shooting An Elephant" by George Orwell (1903-1950) is to me, a memoir of the time he spent in Moulmein, Burma, as a European sub-divisional police officer of the town. He was sent there to attempt control of the unruly Burmese people by the British Empire. Orwell was a white European and was hated by the people because...

    British Empire, Burma, Empire 1069  Words | 3  Pages

  • Symbolism in Orewll's "Shooting an Elephant"

    Name Instructor English 15 October 2010 "Death of an Elephant": Symbolism in Orwell As a former business major, whenever I read, whether fiction or non-fiction, I tend to focus too much on the surface meaning—the facts—and I often miss the subtle symbolism and deeper meaning of a piece of literature. As an English major, I am attempting to change, but I am often skeptical of symbolism, fearing that we may be reading too much into an author’s words. For...

    Asian Elephant, British Empire, Burma 1312  Words | 4  Pages

  • Treatment of Imperialism in Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant"

    Shooting an Elephant: George Orwell Prepared by: A.B.M.Mukhlesur Rahman BA (Hons.), MA, BCS (Education) Treatment of Imperialism ...

    British Empire, British Raj, Burma 896  Words | 3  Pages

  • Analysis of George Orwell's 'Shooting an Elephant'

    Technique Analysis of ‘Shooting an elephant’ Written by George Orwell Essay by Arthur Diennet In 1936, George Orwell published his short story ‘Shooting an elephant’ in an English magazine. Since then, it has been republished dozens of times and holds a place as a definitive anti-colonial piece of literature, in an era where the British Empire was at its peak and covered almost 1/3 of the Earth’s surface. George Orwell believed that “…imperialism was an evil thing...” and uses much themes...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 1044  Words | 3  Pages

  • Rhetorical Analysis of Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant"

    While reading the essay Shooting an Elephant, first published in 1936 by Eric Blair under the pen name of George Orwell, one gets captivated by the intricate web of rhetoric that Blair weaves throughout the piece. Surely, the reason this essay keeps the attention of the reader so well is because Blair writes with an unmistakably strong exigency. It is this need of his to tell the world the truth about imperialism that enables him to write something so captivating. Blair found himself in Moulmein...

    Appeal, Burma, George Orwell 1406  Words | 4  Pages

  • British Imperialism in Burma: Shooting an Elephant

     Abstract The present study looks at an important political essay “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell. The literary critics gave the text wide recognition and appreciation. It depicts Orwell’s anti-imperialistic view which is presented through the shooting of an elephant. The theme is presented in a fantastic way and this is evident from Orwell’s use of lexis, syntax, cohesive ties, point of view, and figures of speech. A closer look at the experiences he had gone indicate that his sentiment...

    British Empire, British Raj, Burma 2561  Words | 7  Pages

  • Analysis of Contrasts in Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant"

    A N A LY S I S O F C O N T R A S T S I N O R W E L L ’ S “ S H O O T I N G A N ELEPHANT” “And my whole life, every white man's life in the East, was one long struggle not to be laughed at.” At firs glance it may seem that this sentence is really not important in comparison with lots of others in the, in my opinion, insanely great and perfectly written short story, “Shooting an Elephant”. This sentence is later reinforced at the end, “I often wondered whether any of the others grasped that I had...

    British Empire, British Raj, Burma 992  Words | 3  Pages

  • George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant: a Summary

    George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant: a Summary George Orwell, from a first person narrative perspective of a British officer in Moulmein, Burma, writes an autobiographical essay titled Shooting an Elephant, confessing the inner conflict of a British police officer. From his experience in British-ruled India in the early Twentieth Century, his essay shows feelings in the area and the East against Europe, and faults of the imperialism. While he was there he is having to do something that caused ethical...

    British Empire, Burma, Ethics 1123  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Shooting An Elephant The well written narrative essay of George Orwell (shooting An Elephant) and Salvation of Langston Hughes, dealing with their life story and experience show the set of qualities that make each author distinctive. However, the authors used a particular way to narrate their story making them alive. So this particular way used by each of them let make a critical comparison and contrast analysis related to each author personality. Langston Hughes toward Salvation used an...

    Accept, Burma, George Orwell 726  Words | 2  Pages

  • Response to George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant"

    themselves. George Orwell, in “Shooting an Elephant”, tells a story of his past when he killed an elephant in order to please the Burmese crowd. At the time, Orwell was a white Indian Imperial Police officer who was disliked by the country's natives due to the fact that he was European. One day, he heard of an elephant's doing of ravaging the town, so he ran to the scene with a rifle. When he finally arrived, he found himself observing a peacefully feeding elephant while a huge crowd of Burmans gathered...

    Belief, Burma, Conformity 949  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting the Elephant

    In George Orwell's story, Shooting the Elephant, the narrator is faced with a strenuous decision that is against a somewhat formidable foe. The foe is not some lunatic of a man, but a raging elephant. The elephant has been causing amok in the town. The narrator, who is also a police officer, is called down to investigate the havoc that is being caused. Upon hearing about the troubles the elephant had caused the Burmese population and seeing for himself what the elephant has done, he is faced with...

    Guilt 846  Words | 1  Pages

  • Analysis of a narrative text: “Shooting an Elephant” (George Orwell)

    Analysis of a narrative text: Shooting an Elephant (George Orwell) “Shooting an Elephant” is an autobiographically influenced short story written by George Orwell and published in 1936. It deals with the inner conflict of an imperial police officer in Burma who feels pressured by the Burmese and forced to kill an outraged elephant in order to prove himself and his status as an imperial police officer. The short story can be divided into two parts. In the first two paragraphs the narrator introduces...

    British Empire, Burma, Empire 1074  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an elephant

    Shooting an Elephant (Orwell, 1936) During the years (1823-1886) as British Empire had control over Burma, a British Indian Imperial Police named George Orwell wrote an outstanding essay/story through which he expressed the morality of British Imperialism and the hatred of the Burmese towards this Empire. The use of a certain type of language has made this story different from others. The use of symbolism and metaphors is one of the most important uses of language that Orwell uses to describe...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 740  Words | 2  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Shooting An Elephant Questions 1)George Orwell has an extremely scornful attitude towards imperialism. He views it as a corrupt form of government. He has a strong disgust for the native people, as they continually harass him on a daily basis. They attempt to trip him on the soccer field, laugh and make fun of him. Orwell dislikes his position in Burma, as he frequently states that he does not like having power and ruling over a foreign people. Many times the masses of people tend to go around what...

    Bamar, Burma, Burmese people 505  Words | 2  Pages

  • A Brief Study of George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant

    Brief Study of George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant Based on physics science, everything which moves in this world definitely needs time to travel from one place to another. The time is affected by distance, the amount of space between two things, which will determine whether the travel from one place to another will take a long time or a short one. The connection between time and distance will create velocity, the speed which is generated by something when it is moving through a distance in...

    Anglo-Burmese Wars, British Empire, Burma 2189  Words | 6  Pages

  • Elephant

    school, work or household chores is something almost everyone is familiar with. But what is life even worth living if all you deal with is necessary deeds which you cannot even vouch for? This is a question Polly Clark raises with her short story “Elephant”. William, who is the main character and narrator of the story, is an ordinary man in his thirties whose job is to write biographies of young, female pop singers. William has a lot on his mind, but he has to constantly avoid being distracted from...

    A Story, Fiction, Jonathan Safran Foer 1176  Words | 3  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Shooting an Elephant A price is payed to save oneself from humiliation, but, being pressured into doing something that one doesn't want to do, makes people feel lost and pushed into a big problem. In the story "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell, he himself goes through a struggle in being the one to shoot an Elephant. In the beginning he knew what he had to avoid of being laughed at from the Burmese people that surrounded him, since he is an imperial policeman. Throughout the story, Orwell...

    Burma, Connotation, George Orwell 594  Words | 2  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Shooting an Elephant In life, everyone has their own choices to make. Most of the time, the side that one has to choose is not what they want but what they need. Just one wrong decision can even cost a life. Hence many choices are immensely difficult. A significant one could be choosing to follow one own heart or to surrender under the pressure of the society they live in. This is the one that occur in Orwell situation. In his essay, Orwell writes about the one who has the responsibility of managing...

    Atmospheric pressure, British Empire, Burma 594  Words | 2  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Anoop Mahal Dr. Gavin Paul English 1100, Section 15 29 June 2013 Critical Analysis #2 George Orwell’s essay, “Shooting an Elephant” details one of the most unforgettable moments in his life. He relives the period in his youth where he was stationed in Moulmein, Burma as a “sub-divisional police officer of the town” (472) Orwell explains how he was tasked with subduing a runaway elephant, which was rampaging through the town; Orwell ultimately found himself going against his will and having to brutally...

    British Empire, Burma, George Orwell 769  Words | 2  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Shooting an ElephantShooting an Elephant” is an essay written by George Orwell from 1938. The story is about his own experience when he was an English sub-divisional policeman in a town in India called Burma. At that time India was under the control of Britain and Orwell worked for The British Imperial Police, so he has to do orders even though his sympathy lie with the “natives”. One day Orwell was called out, because a tame elephant was ravaging the bazaar. With him he took his rifle...

    British Empire, Burma, Colonialism 559  Words | 2  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    In the reading, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell is narrating about his feeling and pressure shooting an elephant. A little about the writer, Orwell, is a British police officer who was born in India. He was hated by large numbers of people in Moulmein, in Lower Burma as the British had colonized Burma. One day he was notified that there was an elephant roaming around the street. The elephant was however not wild but everyone were frightened since it was enormous and disrupting. It made people...

    Anxiety, Burma, George Orwell 678  Words | 2  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    2014 Student Dialogue: Shooting an Elephant In George Orwell's dialogue Shooting an Elephant, he accentuates the grave aversion that he has for being a police officer in Moulmein. The author uses many literary devices to depict his controversy with killing the elephant or not, such as foreshadowing, and speaking in first person, and appealing to pathos. The main element used in this dialogue is conflict, Orwell shows how he contemplates on whether to shoot the elephant or not. The literary elements...

    Burma, Conflict, Fiction 626  Words | 2  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    Mark Morrison Page 1 Professor Bautista English 110 October 8, 2012 “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell In his essay “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell recounts a time in his life when as a British police officer in India, he was faced with the moral dilemma of having to shoot an elephant in order to save his pride. In the beginning of the essay, Orwell describes it as a time of tension and hostility. For example, if a European woman was seen walking alone in a bazaar she...

    Anger, British Empire, Burma 435  Words | 2  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

    In ''Shooting an Elephant,'' George Orwell demonstrates the vanity of imperialism and expresses its negative outcomes and how it can influence the country that is being run. By pointing out a minor conflict- shooting an elephant while serving as a police officer in Burma, Orwell uses his language to illustrate the downfalls of the imperialism and brings his audience into the immediacy of his world as colonial police officer. All through the story, Orwell indirectly expresses his political views...

    British Empire, Burma, George Orwell 670  Words | 2  Pages

  • Shooting an Elephant

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    Shooting an Elephant Orwell battles a constant struggle between his role as a British Police Officer and as a citizen who can recognize the error of the dominating, imperialistic government whose rules he must enforce. Orwell dislikes the tyrannical ways of British imperialism and is also discontent with the “evil-spirited little beasts who try to make his job impossible”. Orwell details the struggle between the misconception that he is another white tyrant in the British regime and the reality...

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  • Shooting an Elephant

    Cheslar UC Expo Period 4 5 March 2013 Student Dialogue: Shooting an Elephant One of the biggest issues in governments is corruption. Corruption however, is an issue created by the individuals through how they choose to use their power, whether it is for the good of everyone or not. The struggle with doing what is right, and what people in power tell you to do, is one of the biggest elements in George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant.” The true story tells about George’s experiences policing during...

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  • Shooting an Elephant

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