"Please Explain Why These Standards Are Important When Determining Whether Or Not Physical Evidence May Be Admitted Into Court" Essays and Research Papers

  • Please Explain Why These Standards Are Important When Determining Whether Or Not Physical Evidence May Be Admitted Into Court

    Daubert and Frye Standard Professor Lance Spivey CJE1641-12Week 11 Criminalistics II By Sandy January 2013 Daubert and Frye Standard Please explain the Frye Standard. 1. The Frye Standard is a standard used to determine the admissibility of an expert’s scientific testimony. A court in which applies the Frye Standard must determine whether or not the method which the evidence was obtained was...

    Court, Daubert standard, Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals 439  Words | 2  Pages

  • Court Visit

    aim of the court report is to get you out of the classroom and into the courtroom to see how the law works in practice! We would like you to visit a court to observe proceedings for a couple of hours and then write a report on your visit. Planning your court visit It is important to have an understanding of the court system before you embark on your visit. Therefore, please complete the required reading for Week 1 and 2 before visiting a court. Your best chance of seeing a court case from...

    Bench, Court, Judge 1105  Words | 4  Pages

  • The Importance of Physical Evidence

    What is Physical Evidence? Physical evidence is any object that can establish that a crime has been committed or can link a crime and its victim or perpetrator. Almost anything can be physical evidence, to list the objects that could be used as physical evidence is impossible. (Saferstein, R. 2009) Common Types of Physical Evidence There are several common types of physical evidence that are found at a crime scene and can be used in cases. However, the weight of a given piece of evidence is ultimately...

    Computer forensics, Evidence law, Fiber 909  Words | 3  Pages

  • Explain why the adversary system of trial is the best system for achieving justice in criminal trials?

    Explain why the adversary system of trial is the best system for achieving justice in criminal trials? The adversary system of trial is the best system for achieving justice in criminal trials for a number of different reasons. The use of a jury, the standard of evidence relied upon and the standard of proof, the cross-examining of witnesses and the ability to plead guilty, contribute greatly to reaching justice in the adversary system. They are all reasons which help the adversary system in accomplishing...

    Adversarial system, Civil law, Common law 1021  Words | 4  Pages

  • evidence law

    According to the Evidence Act Cap 6, evidence denotes the means by which any alleged matter or facts the truth of which is submitted to investigations, approved or disapproved, admissions, presumption of law and observations by courts in the judicial capacity as per section 2[1]d of the act. Rules of evidence refer to the procedure of admitting relevant facts by courts of law and in general they are referred to as Relevancy and Admissibility of Evidence According to section 4, it may be given from...

    Appeal, Circumstantial evidence, Court 2224  Words | 6  Pages

  • Explain what the CPS will do in domestic violence cases, and describe their role in the case up to conviction or equital?

    MUST MEET FULL CODE TEST Evidential Stage – Ensure sufficient evidence to anticipate a realistic prospect of conviction against each defendant on each charge, and the jury will be more likely to convict as a result. The CPS will encourage police to use ACPO guidance to gather a wide range of evidence. Public Interest Stage – Conviction is more likely to result in a significant sentence if the:- • Offence involved a weapon or threat of violence • Offence was carried out in the presence of a child ...

    Bail, Crime, Criminal law 2382  Words | 7  Pages

  • From Crime Scene to Court Room

    Scene to Court Jodi Grant DeVry University Instructor: Peter Conis March 20, 2012 Forensic Science: From Crime Scene to Court The curiosity starts when the yellow “Do Not Cross” tape goes up; it’s a sign that something awful has happened, a crime scene. The crime scene is a very important part of an investigation, whether it is a burglary, sexual assault, or a homicide. It is crucial that nothing be disturbed or touched until proper procedures are followed. Without evidence, the case...

    Bloodstain pattern analysis, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, Evidence 2438  Words | 7  Pages

  • Visit to Court - Court Report

    ContentsIntroductionCourt DetailsThe Subject Matter of the CaseLayout of the Court and Roles of Court ParticipantsInteresting ObservationsDegree of formality in the court proceedingHow the evidence was presentedUnderstanding the Happening of a Court Room8Understanding Court ProcessReflection of Court Experience9Reference ListIntroduction:This is a report describing an observation of a criminal court proceeding that I attended at Brisbane District Court, Queensland. In this report I will state the kind of hearing...

    Common law, Court, Crime 1646  Words | 5  Pages

  • Why Physical Education Is Important

    An important question regarding people today, from the ages of 9 to 90 is why is physical education important? Physical education is important for a number of reasons, one of the biggest reasons being that if someone is physical fit and participates in physical activity daily, the chances are, their going to live a longer, healthier life than one who is not physical fit and does not participate in physical activity on a daily basis. Another big reason is physical education and athletics help define...

    Education, Exercise, Learning 1160  Words | 3  Pages

  • Identifying And Collecting Physical Evidence

    Identifying and Collecting Physical Evidence There are many differents things involved in the identification and collection evidence. In order to do these things you have to know what things like what physical evidence is, what impressions are, different types of evidence you could find and how to use it and knowing what forensic science is and the different types is important too. Also you need to know the proper labelling technique. In...

    American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Computer forensics, Fingerprint 1384  Words | 4  Pages

  • So Why Is Ethics Important to the Practice of Law?

    So why is ethics important to the practice of law? The sad truth is becoming more and more apparent; our profession has seen a steady decline by casting aside established traditions and canons of professional ethics that evolved over centuries ...When we speak of the decline in "ethical" standards, we should not use the term 'ethics' to mean only compliance with the Ten Commandments or other standards of common, basic morality.....A lawyer can [adhere to all these requirements] and still fail...

    Barrister, Court, Ethics 776  Words | 3  Pages

  • Exclusion of evidence under section 78 of PACE 1984 and the right to a fair trial under Article 6

    which the criminal courts have exercised their power to exclude prosecution evidence under section 78 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 is sufficient to satisfy an individual’s right to a fair trial under Article 6 of the ECHR? The courts have two mediums through which they can express their power to exclude certain prosecution evidence; discretion as defined in the common law, and statutory discretion as detailed in section 78 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE).1 Academic...

    Council of Europe, Criminal law, European Convention on Human Rights 2201  Words | 6  Pages

  • Court Report

    LAWS1021: Court research report The basic division in the structure of criminal courts is between the lower criminal courts – the local courts, Children’s court and Coroner’s court – and the higher criminal courts – the District Court and the Supreme Court. In observing proceedings at the Local, District and Supreme Courts over a period of three days a number of aspects of the criminal justice system were made apparent. The administration, processes and practices of the criminal trial are extremely...

    Common law, Court, Criminal justice 1871  Words | 6  Pages

  • Juvenile and Adult Courts

    Juvenile and Adult Courts: A Comparative Analysis Zanetta Eave, Tasha Harris, and Lee Blackmon CJA/374 July 29, 2013 Cory Kelly Introduction The “Juvenile and Adult Courts: A Comparative Analysis” paper will compare juvenile courts with adult courts. This paper will present an overview of the juvenile justice system, a point-by-point comparison between juvenile and adult courts. The adjudication process by which a juvenile is transferred to the adult court system. This paper will also discuss...

    Court, Crime, Criminology 1736  Words | 5  Pages

  • Evidence

    unconstitutionally obtained evidence The exclusionary rule is the rule that defines the circumstances in which a court will exclude evidence on the grounds that it has been obtained in violation of the accused’s constitutional rights. Traditionally the common law did not have an exclusionary rule. The court allowed evidence to be admitted that had been obtained through the use of illegal means, for example, searching a dwelling without a search warrant, any evidence obtained is an illegal evidence, but this was...

    Court, Exclusionary rule, Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution 2374  Words | 6  Pages

  • The Imprtance of Evidence Base Practice

    Module title: Using Knowledge and Evidence to Support Study and Practice Assignment title: What are the best available treatments to tackle obesity? Course: B.A.N.S - Adult Branch Name: Lisa Clarke Student number: 22007270 Number of words: 1564 Submission date: dd/mm/yyyy WHAT ARE THE BEST AVAILABE TREATMENTS TO TACKLE OBESITY? According to the case study if weight loss could be achieved then the health risks associated with obesity could be reversed. Even moderate weight loss of 10 per...

    Bariatric surgery, Cancer, Dieting 2018  Words | 6  Pages

  • Should Eye Witness Testimony Be Banned from Court?

    testimony be used as evidence in a court of law? Discuss using research and/ or psychological theory to support your views. By: Megan Hong Word Count = 799 (Not including headings and bibliography) Eyewitness testimony is the account a bystander gives in the courtroom, describing what they perceived happened during the specific incident under investigation. Ideally this recollection of events is detailed; however this is not always the case. This recollection is used as evidence to show what happened...

    Court, Criminal law, Eyewitness identification 915  Words | 3  Pages

  • Gender Bias in Family Court

    father through family court? In most cases, when a father and mother go into family court for whatever reason it is, the mother is favored due to the stereotype that they can provide a better life for their children. From experience, I know that a father is just as “nurturing” as a mother. A father may not be able to play mom, but he has just as much capability to take care of his children just as much as a mother. Judges in family court should pay more attention to whether or not they’re being more...

    Child custody, Divorce, Family 997  Words | 3  Pages

  • Why Pe Is Important for Students

    PE 1 Why PE Is Important For Students PED 212 Carrie Phillips June 29, 2011 PE 2 Why PE Is Important for students Physical education is an important part in our elementary schools. This type of movement can help kids perform better academically, boost brainpower, give them a lifetime fitness goal, can help with childhood obesity, and help them to have better health habits in the future. Physical education may be the only exercise a child gets and if we take that away...

    Education, Exercise, Learning 918  Words | 3  Pages

  • Criminal Evidence

    Evidence – Means, Mode, or Manner to Ascertain the Truth about a Matter of Fact in a Judicial Proceeding. Essential Parts of the Legal Definition of Evidence: WHAT: 3M – Means, Mode or Manner WHY: ATF – to ascertain the truth about a matter of fact WHERE: J – in a Judicial Proceeding - it is a medium or means by which a fact is proved or disproved. Proof – RESULT, EFFECT or PERFECTION of an evidence. - result of a PROBATIVE EFFECT of evidence. - it is the perfection of evidence...

    Evidence, Evidence law, Jury 1062  Words | 5  Pages

  • Criminal Evidence

    rules about what is allowed of people or owed to people. There are many types of rights in our society. In addition to the Constitution, court decisions and statutes are important sources of rights, and so are state constitutions. The Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure sometimes shed light on and clarify important rulings handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court. Additionally, the Federal Rules set forth the criminal procedure guidelines that federal criminal justice practitioners are required to abide...

    Felix Frankfurter, Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution 1528  Words | 5  Pages

  • Should Illegally Obtained Evidence Then Be Admissible in Court

    in Singapore is that evidence obtained through private entrapment is admissible in courts; as long as it not admitted “unfairly against the accused”. However, the phrase “unfairly against the accused” is very ambiguous in nature as it is hard define what unfairly means. In the paper entitled “Whether a Singapore Court has a Discretion to Exclude Evidence Admissible in Criminal Proceedings, “unfairly” was _____. Should illegally obtained evidence then be admissible in court? We proposed that they...

    Common law, Court, Crime 819  Words | 3  Pages

  • Police Courts and Corrections

    procedures is for officers to prevent and control crime. Officers work with prosecutors to obtain evidence to set a conviction in the court of law. * Courts: Court is where a person accused of committing a punishable offense go to have their criminal responsibility determined by judges and juries. The purpose of having court is to seek justice and discover the truth. The people who make the court function properly are prosecutors, defense attorneys, and judges. * Corrections: In the corrections...

    Corrections, Crime, Criminal justice 2379  Words | 7  Pages

  • Evidence

    Assignment #1 Evidence: CRJS355 Real/ Physical Evidence Real or physical evidence is evidence that can be addressed to the court directly without any interposing of a testimony of witness other than what is required of the basis for such evidence. Real evidence and physical evidence is basically the same thing physical evidence is just object that has been involved in the actual crime scene or took place and played some type of part in it. But when it comes to real evidence it basically...

    Circumstantial evidence, Direct evidence, Evidence 1104  Words | 3  Pages

  • Identifying Trace Evidence

    Identifying Trace Evidence Forensic Chemistry and Trace Evidence Analysis CJ 385 Professor Luckas July 15, 2012 Question 1 In order to identify that a white powder might contain cocaine, a forensic drug chemist can conduct a number of tests. The tests in order to identify cocaine are conducted based on the physical and chemical properties of cocaine. The physical and chemical properties of a substance make it unique, thus identifiable and distinguishable from other physical evidences obtained...

    Forensic chemistry, Forensic materials engineering, Forensic polymer engineering 1190  Words | 4  Pages

  • Explain the Origin and the Concept of ‘Neighbour Principle’. Illustrate with Decided Cases the Application of This Principle.

    ASSIGNMENT QUESTION 2 Explain the origin and the concept of ‘Neighbour Principle’. Illustrate with decided cases the application of this principle. Above all, I want to explain the ‘Neighbour Principle’’. Lord Atkin stated his famous neighbour Principle as was that 'You must take reasonable care to avoid acts or omissions which you can reasonably foresee would be likely to injure your neighbour `.This is sometimes known as the neighbour principle. By `neighbour`, Lord Atkin did not...

    Common law, Contract, Duty of care 1869  Words | 6  Pages

  • Evidence Based Practice

    the whole well being of the person. Which includes the physical and physiological, mental, psychosocial, and emotional aspect of the client or service user. It is therefore necessary for the nurse to have a wide array of knowledge, skills and attitude to deal with it. In so far as knowledge and skills are concerned, the nurse can readily make use of different tools to aid his or her practice. This essay will explore the context of evidence based practice in nursing. It will be defined based on...

    Evidence-based medicine, Health care, Medicine 2115  Words | 7  Pages

  • Outline: Critical Thinking and Evidence

    Chapter 3 - A Process of Critical Thinking - In this Chapter it will explain to you how you use critical thinking everyday to make decisions and solve problems. When you use critical thinking you can explore many problems step by step and come up with reasonable solutions. There are three activities that are the core of critical thinking, they are: analysis, synthesis, and evalution. A. Supporting Critical Thinking with Evidence - As you are writing a college paper, you should think about the purpose...

    Appeal to emotion, Critical thinking, Evidence 1150  Words | 4  Pages

  • Chain of Custody & Preservation of Evidence

    Chain of Custody & Preservation of Evidence Idris Rawls Westwood College It does not matter the reputation you have earned for your high integrity and honesty, you will always be open to allegations of civil or criminal liability. The first type of evidence and usually the most obvious is physical evidence. Evidence can be anything from tangible objects such as cartridge cases and firearms to latent fingerprints and DNA. Evidence collection or recovery step in crime scene processing...

    Crime scene, Evidence law, Fingerprint 2390  Words | 7  Pages

  • Physical Evidence

    PHYSICAL EVIDENCE MANUAL OREGON STATE POLICE FORENSIC SERVICES DIVISION Preference The purpose of this handbook is to educate our customer in the Criminal Justice System regarding the services provided by the Oregon State Police Forensic Services Division, and the recommended methods of documenting, collecting and preserving physical to ensure the best analysis results. The value of properly collected physical evidence followed by examination and interpretation by the forensic laboratory...

    Bloodstain pattern analysis, Combined DNA Index System, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation 22302  Words | 69  Pages

  • Evidence Law and Admissible Statements

    Include your research findings in the following table. |State |Legal requirements |Precedent |Other | |Arizona |Confessions are admissible in evidence in any |Arizona v Londo |Title 13. Admissibility of minor's | | |criminal prosecution if given voluntarily. |Miranda v Arizona |statement | | ...

    Evidence law, Exclusionary rule, Jury 1115  Words | 6  Pages

  • Categories and Types of Evidence and Their Use in the Courtroom

    example of civil crime is when a person does not honor a contract. Criminal law can be substantial or procedural. Substantial criminal law is concerned with various crimes covered with the criminal code but procedural criminal law deals with the prosecution of the crimes mentioned under substantial criminal law. The sentencing recommendations are also stipulated for various criminal crimes under procedural law. Prosecution under criminal codes can only be done when there is proof beyond a reasonable ...

    Appeal, Crime, Criminal law 1666  Words | 5  Pages

  • Ethical Standards and Codes

    Ethical Standards and Codes Stephenie Carter, Sundee Johnson, Saroja Nimmagadda, Selma Pasagic University of Phoenix Ethical Standards and Codes Ethics to some is an intuition of what is right or wrong, and to others it is right or wrong defined by laws, rules, codes, or culture standards. Ethical standards and codes are essential in the professional world, especially in a clinical setting. Ethics guide reactions and interactions from which ethical decisions are made. The purpose of this...

    Applied ethics, Business ethics, Ethical code 1774  Words | 6  Pages

  • Forensics Examiner and Digital Evidence in Nigeria

    EXPERT EVIDENCE UNDER NIGERIAN LAW OF EVIDENCE By Philip O Nwachukwu As a general rule under Nigerian law of Evidence, the opinion evidence is irrelevant in court trials. Thus section 66 of the Evidence Act CAP E14, Laws of the. Federation of Nigeria (LFN), 2004 provides that the fact that any person is of the opinion that a fact in issue, or relevant to the issue, does or does not exist, is irrelevant to the existence of such fact except as provided in sections 57 to 65 of the Evidence Act. Exceptions...

    Evidence law, Expert, Expert witness 2122  Words | 6  Pages

  • Court Visit

    COURT VISIT Date of court visit: 25 October 2010. Court name: Snaresbrook Crown court. Courtroom visited: court 1. Judge: T. Lamb QC. (Queen’s Counsel) Name of case viewed: Trial part heard; Remo Rossi. (Rape of a juvenile family member). Representation: V.Girling QC (Instructed by L.Lewis solicitors) for the defendant. G.Reece QC (Instructed by the Crown Prosecution Service) for the Crown. On Monday the 25th of October 2010, I attended Snaresbrook Crown court at court 1 which was hearing...

    Common law, Crime, Human sexual behavior 2134  Words | 7  Pages

  • Explain Why Effective Communication Is Important in Developing Positive Relationships

    Explain why effective communication is important in developing positive relationships with children, young people and adults. It’s widely recognised that the more involved parents are in their child’s education, the better the pupil performs at school. Whether, it’s just being aware of their progress and understanding their achievements or parents taking a more active role and becoming involved with the school itself. In order to establish and maintain interest there needs to be regular and reliable...

    A Great Way to Care, Attention, Childhood 1828  Words | 5  Pages

  • Expertise

    that links them with their personal beliefs when they judge expert testimony. They use a variety of psycholegal research studies to imply the law for legally relevant psychological issues. They claim that social evidence is also the scientific evidence, so it should be admitted in courts. Their study explore whether judges’ and law students’ sociopolitical attitudes affect their judgments. They use the death penalty as a subject because it is an important controversial social issue that most people...

    Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Expert, Expert witness 908  Words | 3  Pages

  • Why Evolution Theory Should Be Taught

    Evolution Theory should be taught at schools.Whenever various debates have taken place in parts of the country regarding whether evolution should be taught in schools, I have always observed the situation with a degree of skeptism; the education I received never attempted to dissuade us from learning about evolution, and while none of my classes ever taught evolution with as much depth as Ernst Mayr attempted to convey in What Evolution Is, both systems taught it as a fact – one that we took for...

    Biology, Charles Darwin, Evolution 1163  Words | 4  Pages

  • The American Criminal Court System

     The American Criminal Court System Sami-Marcia Donovan CJA/224 June 7, 2014 Gwendolyn Burrell Abstract Some say that crime is increasing, while others argue that crime is decreasing, in any event, it is not stopping and the Criminal Court System plays a crucial part in ensuring the safety of the American people and the communities they live in. The purpose of this paper is to examine and evaluate the development of the different court systems, their purpose and how they interact with each...

    Appeal, Judge, Law 1399  Words | 7  Pages

  • Evidence Collection in Sex Related Crimes

    Crime scenes present many possibilities and evidence that may aid investigators in the apprehension and possibly conviction of a known or unknown offender. While this evidence are present at a scene of a crime, it requires specialized training on the part of law enforcement officials to effectively, efficiently and accurately, collect, record and preserve these evidence. Chain of command is especially vital at each stage of the evidence collection, as evidence can easily be lost and even tampered with...

    Criminology, Human sexual behavior, Police 2602  Words | 7  Pages

  • 1.1 Explain Why Positive Relationships with Children and Young People Are Important and How These Are Built and Maintained

    1.1 Explain why positive relationships with children and young people are important and how these are built and maintained It is important to have a positive relationship with children and young adults because if they feel comfortable and secure with the adult and their setting weather it is a childminder, a nursery or a school they will separate more easily from their parent /carer, if they feel emotionally secure they are more likely to participate in the play and learning activities. Children...

    Childhood, Confidence, Infant 1241  Words | 3  Pages

  • Juvenile Court

    20th century, the Juvenile Court system was merely a starting concept that was utilized to “rehabilitate” youth offenders, the philosophy prior to be that parents, primarily fathers were to enforce rules and behaviors with their children. Juveniles’ ranging from seven to fourteen were permissible to be held for their actions if there was evidence they knew their actions and youth older were too punished as seen fit by parents or a government entity. There was no court system to allow for a hearing...

    Childhood, Conduct disorder, Crime 1377  Words | 4  Pages

  • criminal investigation

    The quiz is multiple - choice and will c ontain material from Chapters 5 & 7 and Powerpoints. Some items to focus on include: Examination of Physical Evidence Individual Characteristics Class Characteristics Significance of Physical Evidence Facial Reconstruction Forensic Databases MurderScene: Death and Autopsies Estimating the time of death o Rigor mortis o Livor mortis o Algor mortis Forensic Entomologist History of Fingerprints Henry System Fundamental Principles of Fingerprints ...

    Daubert standard, Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Evidence 704  Words | 5  Pages

  • Determining a Depreciation Policy

    DETERMINING A DEPRECIATION POLICY [IFRS for SME’s: Section 17] IFRS for SMEs defines depreciation as the systematic allocation depreciable amount of an asset over its useful life, Depreciation is often described as the amount by which the economic value embedded in the asset diminishes through its use, namely, the estimated cost of using the asset in the process of generating income or carrying out the operating activities of the entity. Many practicing applies the depreciation based on the...

    Asset, Balance sheet, Depreciation 972  Words | 3  Pages

  • Explain the Sequence and Rate of Each Aspect of Development That Would Normally Be Expected in Children and Young People from Birth to 19 Years Old?

    | | |Explain the sequence and rate of each aspect of development that would normally be expected in children and | | |young people from birth -19years. (chart attached) | | |Explain different theories (for example cognitive, psychoanalytic, humanist, social learning, operant | |...

    Developmental psychology, Game theory, Young 634  Words | 6  Pages

  • Why is perception important Explain the factors influencing perception

    Question No.2: Why is perception important? Explain the factors influencing perception. Answer: Perception can be defined as a process by which individuals organize and interpret their sensory impressions in order to give meaning to their environment. However, as we have noted, what one perceives can be substantially different from objective reality. An individual’s behaviour is based on their perception of reality, not on reality itself. It is important in communicating effectively, assessing...

    Human physical appearance, Mind, Perception 1221  Words | 5  Pages

  • The Sec’s Case Against California Micro Devices: a Lesson in Using Professional Skepticism and Obtaining Sufficient Appropriate Evidence

    Professional Skepticism and Obtaining Sufficient Appropriate Evidence This particular case, involving the SEC, Coopers & Lybrand, and California Micro Devices, Inc. encompasses charges for neglecting to comply with auditing standards. The Securities and Exchange Commission makes these charges against Michael Marrie, audit partner, and Brian Berry, manager, of Coopers & Lybrand. There are three main areas in which the auditing standards were not in compliance, a write-off of accounts receivable...

    Audit, Auditing, Auditor's report 2003  Words | 6  Pages

  • The Independence of the Judiciary Is an Important Value in Irish Constitutional Law

    “The independence of the judiciary is an important value in Irish constitutional law”. Article 35.2 states “All judges shall be independent in the exercise of their judicial functions and subject only to this Constitution and the law”.The above Article and Article 6 encapsulate the separation of powers in the Irish Constitution, from the perspective of the judiciary. The judiciary guard their exclusive powers jealously. In Buckley v. A-G [1950] I.R. 67 (otherwise known as the Sinn Féin Funds...

    Constitution, Executive, Judge 911  Words | 3  Pages

  • Evidence Book and Class Notes

    EVIDENCE Class 1 | Tuesday5/21 | Chapter 1: Why Take This Course? 1-5Chapter 2: Types of Courtroom Evidence 6-19Problem Set 2Chapter 3: Four W’s of the Federal Rules of Evidence 20-31Chapter 4: Structure of a Trial 32-39 | Chapter 2 Notes: TYPES OF COURTROOM EVIDENCE Evidence Defined. Testimony, writings, material objects or other things presented to the senses that are offered to prove the existence or non existence of a fact presented during the trial. California Evidence Code...

    Appeal, Appellate court, Court 30571  Words | 95  Pages

  • Drug Court

    Drug Court Final 1. How did DC begin and why. Why has it been successful in the criminal justice system? Courts started having a lot of drug cases around the mind 1980’s. Justice professionals decided they needed to come up with a new way to combat this problem. Incarceration keeps the individuals from being involved in drug related lifestyles, but they do not receive treatment. Once they get out of jail, the same cycle begins again. Drug Court is able to give these defendants to receive treatment...

    Addiction, Criminal justice, Drug addiction 1104  Words | 3  Pages

  • understand why comunication is important

     1.1 Identify different reasons why people communicate.    To help establish a relationship to confirm that suitable or appropriate action is being taken Sharing information Express feelings 1.2 Explain how effective communication affects all aspects of working in adult social care settings. Without effective communication it is not possible to form any kind of relationship with the people with whom you are working.   Furthermore you would be unable to confirm that you were meeting their...

    Communication, Nonverbal communication, Nonviolent Communication 723  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Relationship between Repressive Defensiveness and Physical Health Outcomes

    The Relationship Between Repressive Defensiveness and Physical Health Outcomes: Implications for Causality The concept of repressive defensiveness (RD) has an extensive history in clinical and personality research (Bonanno, Davis, Singer & Schwartz, 1991). RD is the tendency to avoid negative emotions (Denollet, Martens, Nykĺıcˇek, Conraads & de Gelder, 2008). Repressors are characterised by their elevated levels of physiological and behavioural indicators of anxiety and low self-reported anxiety...

    Breast cancer, Cancer, Epidemiology 1471  Words | 5  Pages

  • In Determining Whether There Is an Agreement Between Parties, Is English Law Commited to an Objective View of Agreement?

    In answering the question, I will explain the difference between subjective and objective views of agreement. Identify which is used in English Law and why? Examine the relevant theories applicable to objective views on agreement. Look at the types of evidence that are used to make objective assessments and finally identify any exceptions to rule. When determining whether an agreement exists between parties we must look at the intentions of each party. It is possible to analyse the intentions...

    Common law, Consumer Protection, Contract 1395  Words | 4  Pages

  • how does an auditor determine that the audit evidence gathered is appropriate

    acceptable as audit evidence, the information obtained by the auditor must be appropriate. Appropriateness in this context means the measure of quality of audit evidence, its relevance to a particular assertion and its reliability. Relevance The question whether evidence is relevant depends on the extent to which it assists the auditor in achieving audit objectives. The audit objective will be related to the assertion ,which is what the auditor is attempting to gather evidence about. For example...

    Accounts receivable, Audit, Auditing 1697  Words | 5  Pages

  • Explain the Main Determinants of Health and Explain How to Promote Health

    Patient Hygiene The aim of this assignment is to explain a nurse’s role in relation to assisting patient’s with meeting their hygiene needs. In order to accomplish this, the following areas of the subject will be highlighted; why hygiene is so important and the various aspects of hygiene such as; what influences hygiene, assessing a patient, bed bathing, oral hygiene and eye care. Oxford dictionary describes hygiene as “the conditions or practices conductive to maintaining health and preventing...

    Health, Health care, Human skin color 1571  Words | 5  Pages

  • Why English Law Is Frequently Chosen to Govern International Trade Contracts?

    Why English law is frequently chosen to govern international trade contracts English law was developed as “common law” system derived mainly from the law imposed by the King in medieval times which was “common” to the whole land and was short on statute law and heavily reliant on case law: the decision of judges. In contrast, “civil law” systems in Europe are founded on interpretations of the codification of Roman law given by the Emperor Justinian (AD 530). A defining feature of civil law system...

    Breach of contract, Civil law, Common law 819  Words | 3  Pages

  • Evidence Based Practice

    This assignment will be set around evidence based practice (EBP) and the nursing part of EBP will be discussed throughout this essay. There will be two parts to this discussion, part 1 will be a clinical question chosen personally, and being researched through the internet using a variety of databases. The end result will then be discussed on how the question performed, and whether it was either easy to research or changes had to be made gain greater or less results. Below is the clinical research...

    Avicenna, Clinical research, Clinical trial 2317  Words | 10  Pages

  • why managerial accounting is important

    Chapter 1 Lecture Notes   Chapter theme: This chapter explains why managerial accounting is important to the future careers of all business students. It answers three questions: (1) What is managerial accounting? (2) Why does managerial accounting matter to your career? and (3) What skills do managers need to succeed? It also discusses the importance of ethics in business and corporate social responsibility.   I.             What is managerial accounting? A.            Examine the difference...

    Business, Business ethics, Decision making 848  Words | 4  Pages

  • Double Standard of Masculinity in Gender Role Socialization

    characteristics are definitive in determining their manliness and masculinity. These characteristics range from not crying when they get hurt to being and playing violently. The socialization of masculinity in our society begins as early as the first stages of infancy. A child's burgeoning sense of self or self-concept is a result of the multitude of ideas, attitudes, behaviors, and beliefs to which he is exposed (Witt 1997). Later in this paper the question of whether there are genetic factors will...

    Aggression, Boy, Gender 2574  Words | 6  Pages

  • Why Is Ethics Important Today?

    WHY IS ETHICS IMPORTANT TODAY? As children, we were taught by our parents that it is wrong to lie, cheat and steal. As we grow up and enter into the real world with some knowledge of right and wrong, we see, first hand the importance of ethics as well as its complexity. The role of ethics in our society is very necessary because it has a large influence on today, as well as the future. We need to learn about good ethics because they guide our decisions, make us who we are and determine our future...

    Axiology, Ethics, Moral psychology 1341  Words | 4  Pages

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