"Plato Republic The Noble Lie" Essays and Research Papers

  • Plato Republic The Noble Lie

    Christopher Behrens The Nobility of a Lie Frederick Nietzsche once wrote that the “untruth, [or lie], is a condition of life.”At least in terms of creating a stable society, Socrates would seem to agree. In The Republic, Socrates points out that civilization is most prone to instability when founded on what he calls a“noble lie.”The lie which, despite its falsehood, serves for the good of society. His noble lie can be broken into two parts: a justification on why the lie applies to all of a society's members...

    Deception, Democracy, Ethics 1724  Words | 5  Pages

  • The Republic: The Noble Lie

    children who are born here are entitled to full citizenship automatically Kallipolis The noble lie, which is divided into two parts, addresses seemingly simple political questions such as, why do I call my neighbor my fellow citizen but not a man born in another city? What gives a city validation to claim its territory? What gives the rulers validation to rule? Socrates claims that in order to do this a lie must be told to convince the citizens of this city that “ the upbringing and education we...

    Black-and-white films, Deception, Democracy 1167  Words | 3  Pages

  • Plato the Republic

    February 2012 The Republic Art has always been controversial in a society because of the many different ways the artist tends to express themselves. Plato, who helped lay the foundation for western culture, saw the problems in art over 2,000 years ago. Plato’s The Republic is a series of books that discusses the republic that Plato is trying to create. In each book Plato touches on different topics dealing with the art, that he feels effect society then. Today, some of the points that Plato argue can still...

    Art, Evil, Form of the Good 1850  Words | 5  Pages

  • Platos Republic

    Socrates describes a perfect city in Plato’s The Republic. Many questions are asked in the book, such as “What is an ideal city?” Or, “What is justice?” And, “Is justice in the city possible?” Socrates tries to find the real meaning of the word justice. He starts with justice within a single person, and then he tries to take that concept and apply it to the city. Then, to figure out the perfect city, he goes back to the single person to find justice there. He shows that the perfect city needs the...

    Caste, Caste system in India, Ethics 1792  Words | 4  Pages

  • Was Plato a totalitarian

    are significant to politics. With this definition in mind, this essay will put forward an argument in favour of the notion that Plato was a totalitarian, evident in his conception of the kallipolis which drives forward a totalitarian and utopian dream for a ‘natural class rule of the wise few over the ignorant many’3. On the contrary, a literary reading of Plato’s Republic could dismiss such ideas as independent of Plato’s voice in the first place. Furthermore, it has been put forward that Plato’s...

    Democracy, Karl Popper, Lie 1486  Words | 7  Pages

  • Paradox of the Republic: Plato

    opposition to one another but are mutually needed to function. In Plato's Republic he discusses several paradoxes. While reading The Republic we can see which side of these paradoxes Plato favors. We find which side he feels should be stressed so that we may live in a reasonable and safe society and be better human beings. There are three categories in which these paradoxes have been divided into: ethical, metaphysical and political. Plato was a legendary Athenian philosopher. His main influence was his...

    Aristotle, Deductive reasoning, Inductive reasoning 2775  Words | 7  Pages

  • Plato Republic

    “Have you never noticed how imitation, if long continued from an early age, becomes part of a person’s nature, turns into habits of body, speech and mind?”(..) In Plato’s Republic, Socrates tries to find the answer to the question: “What is Justice?”. He does this by creating a perfectly just city in order to find justice in the soul. He discusses how the citizens in this city, especially the guardians, should be educated. In this essay I will explain how, according to Socrates, the arts educate...

    Arts, Censorship, Education 1211  Words | 3  Pages

  • platos theory of justice

    2) Explain Plato’s theory of Justice One’s search for the meaning of justice in Plato’s “Republic” would finally lead to two definitions:  -Justice is Harmony. -Justice is Doing one’s own job.  Finding these two phrases, however, is hardly enough to get a clear sense of what justice is. Plato offers two main analogies to examine the definition of justice. The division of parts in the soul as well as the parts of the state; We would now examine the structure of the soul. The soul is divided...

    Justice, Mind, Plato 735  Words | 2  Pages

  • Plato Republic Education Quez

     In Plato’s Republic, the concept of education is one of the most vital elements of this new city Plato is trying to create. So much of Plato’s Republic is geared towards education of its citizens because Plato firmly believes that education and wisdom is the key to and heart of the city, and without proper education of the citizens the city would not flourish. It’s with his strong views on the old traditions of Athens, and how one ought to be raised as a child to an adult, will give a clear indication...

    Education, English-language films, Property 1275  Words | 4  Pages

  • Censorship in Platos Republic

    In The Republic, Plato plays around with the argument that it is better to be just than unjust. His vessel for showing this is through the forming of an “ideal” city. In this hypothetical city he creates a censored educational system and abolishes the “typical” family structure in hopes that the society would be just. Taking in the context and the time period, Socrates’ ideas were radical but plausible, if executed correctly. Through that execution, though, I am not completely convinced that human...

    Experiment, Hypothesis, Plato 992  Words | 3  Pages

  • Plato: the Republic (Book 1)

    Introduction to Philosophy Plato is one of the many philosophers who have had an influence on the ideas of humane thinking. Born in Athens, believed to be around 428 BC, Plato has expressed various works pertaining to idealism and the theory of forms. Plato has made many allegories and metaphors of life. One of his many famous writings would be included in his collected dialogues. The Republic, Book 1, is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato around his mid-life. The Republic (Book 1) focuses on the...

    Ethics, Justice, Philosophy 958  Words | 3  Pages

  • Allegory of the Cave- Plato Republic

    llegory Anthony Guerra Professor Neilson Philosophy & Ethics 14 October 2010 The Allegory of the Cave and The Matrix Book VII of The Republic begins with Socrates’ “Allegory of the Cave.” The purpose of this allegory is to “make an image of our nature in its education and want of education” in other words, it illustrates Socrates’ model of education. In addition, the allegory corresponds perfectly to the analogy of the divided line. However, this Cave Analogy is also an applicable theme...

    Allegory, Allegory of the Cave, Matrix series 1046  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Significance of Art in The Republic of Plato

    The Significance of Art in The Republic of Plato Artist and philosophers alike have criticized The Republic of Plato as praising the justice of a censored society which, in reading The Republic as a philosophical treatise, is not surprising. Quotes abound in The Republic supporting this claim, such as “we must supervise the makers of tales; and if they make a fine tale, it must be approved, but if it’s not, it must be rejected. We’ll persuade nurses and mothers to tell the approved tales to their...

    Aristotle, City, Glaucon 1923  Words | 5  Pages

  • Reflection Paper on "The Republic" by Plato

    Reflection on: the “Republic,” by Plato. Greek philosopher, Plato, is considered to be one of the most influential people in Western Philosophy. The fact that he was a student of Socrates and a teacher of Aristotle leaves no questions about his competence. One of his fundamental works is the “Republic”. Even though it was written in 380 BC, Plato’s and Socrates’s thoughts are still relevant in twenty first century. This paper will evaluate the quote from the “Republic” and provide a summary...

    Aristotle, Logic, Mind 976  Words | 3  Pages

  • Plato's Republic/ Kallipolis

    justice? I would definitely have to disagree, but by the same token, he had thousands of followers. The thought of this is heinous and ludicrous, but it is the truth. I think that a similar argument could be made against Plato. To me, Plato errs in his definition of justice. Plato comes up with the Kallipolis, his idea of a just society. In this society, he strives for perfection. However, he is definitely in contradiction. The problem with this "just" society that he fabricated is that many injustices...

    Adolf Hitler, Ethics, Justice 1469  Words | 4  Pages

  • Interpretive Essay of Platos the Republic

    It is said that for any problem, there is an appropriate solution that accompanies that problem. In Plato’s The Republic, Socrates is involved in an intense argument along with five other men. They all encounter the same problems in their discussion. The problems are to correctly define justice, decipher if justice is a virtue, and see if justice leads to true happiness. Socrates, with the help of the other men, does find the solution to all of their problems after much back and forth conversation...

    Cardinal virtues, Ethics, Justice 1600  Words | 6  Pages

  • A Review of justice in Plato

    A brief Review of justice, Plato’s Republic It is the 5th century BC, in ancient Greece specifically the city state of Athens, it is here were a man commonly known as Plato (true name Aristocles) begins to write brilliant philosophical dialogues, sparked by the state mandated execution of his teacher Socrates. It was in this moment Plato etched his name in to the physique of humanity, as one of the greatest philosophers in history, it was at a midpoint of his career when he wrote what is arguably...

    Adeimantus of Collytus, Glaucon, Justice 1668  Words | 4  Pages

  • Plato

    Book X, Plato claims that most poetry of necessity contains evil men (in order to produce interest and pleasure), and this too forms a basis for a wide-ranging condemnation of poetry. That imitation has harmful effects is a complex matter; Plato’s argument rests on several crucial assumptions concerning the effect of poetry on an audience. In Book II he claims that “a young man must not be allowed to hear that he does nothing strange when he commits the most shocking offenses” (Republic, II, p25)...

    Aristotle, Epistemology, Imitation 1018  Words | 3  Pages

  • Plato Republic

    Justice of “The Republic” In his book “the Republic”, Plato tried to build up an ideal society. He divided the ideal society into three classes: rulers, guardians, and workers. As long as each class of people lived harmonious and did their responsibilities, the society would become stable and prosperous. How did make people live with harmony? Obviously, the core issue of “the republic” is justice. Justice is a proper, harmonious relationship among the people in the three classes. Plato suggested that...

    Cardinal virtues, Ethics, Justice 683  Words | 2  Pages

  • Plato and the Theme of Justice in His Play 'the Republic'

    Plato ‘The Republic’ By N.Sutton A Bit about Plato Himself... Plato (Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn, "wide, broad-browed") (428/427 BC – 348/347 BC), was a Classical Greek philosopher, who together with his teacher, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, helped to lay the philosophical foundations of Western culture. Plato was also a mathematician, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the western world. Plato was originally...

    Ancient Greece, Glaucon, Justice 2411  Words | 6  Pages

  • how plato presents justice in the republic

    Juan Rodriguez Lacasa The theme of justice in The Republic “The Republic” by Plato is considered to be a Socratic dialogue finished in 390 BC. In what is considered one of the most valuable pieces of work of Plato tries to answer questions such as: why should people do good things? Or other questions like: are people rewarded for doing bad things? However he also treats other themes as the theory of forms, the immortality of the soul and the roles of the philosopher and of poetry in society...

    Ethics, Justice, Philosophy 1592  Words | 4  Pages

  • Plato

    Assignment #1 February 26, 2014 In Plato's The Republic, the author has to use rhetoric because of its controversial content. In order for Plato to create his idea of a perfect society, he makes the argument that censorship is essential for the benefit of the society as a whole. Though his idea opposes the fundamental beliefs of his audience, Plato creates a rhetorical strategy that disputes the case in which there must be censorship within the Republic. Plato also argues that monitoring what the children...

    Adeimantus of Collytus, Glaucon, Logic 1106  Words | 5  Pages

  • Plato

    1. Introduction In this essay in is a discussion about based on philosopher and which group of people Plato thinks should be ruling and why. The essay will start off with clarifying key concepts, for example what is a philosopher because it is much easier to understand the easy when one understands the key terms in it, terms that will appear throughout the essay itself. Then Plato’s theory will then be analysed in more detail and it is also of great importance that one also talks about Plato’s...

    Ethics, Justice, Logic 1546  Words | 4  Pages

  • Plato

    is today, one of them being Plato. In addition to being an outstanding philosopher, he was also a mathematician and a writer. One of Plato’s biggest inspirations was his very own teacher Socrates. Socrates never wrote down a word of what he said, but thankfully Plato was able to record it all down for him and wrote many dialogues about Socrates words and teachings. One of Plato’s most famous works was his dialogue, The Republic which was written in 380 BC. The Republic consists of ten books total...

    Aristotle, Belief, Epistemology 1686  Words | 5  Pages

  • Plato

    interpreted as being conservative using narratives from Crito and The Republic. Lastly, I will argue why this behaviour instead demonstrates that Socrates was a radical. In the Apology, Plato provides a narrative of Socrates' defence for using the elenchus, an exhaustive questioning method, to stir the position of Athenian citizens on traditional values (Jowett, 2009). Derived from various arguments in The Apology, Crito, and The Republic, it can be found that Socrates had two motives for his conduct...

    Athenian democracy, Justice, Law 2312  Words | 6  Pages

  • Plato on Justice

    Plato's interpretation of justice as seen in ‘The Republic' is a vastly different one when compared to what we and even the philosophers of his own time are accustomed to. Plato would say justice is the act of carrying out one's duties as he is fitted with. Moreover, if one's duties require one to lie or commit something else that is not traditionally viewed along with justice; that too is considered just by Plato's accounts in ‘The Republic.' I believe Plato's account of justice, and his likely...

    Ethics, Justice, Logic 1002  Words | 3  Pages

  • Platos Republic

    Cory Reasor November 7, 2011 Plato’s The Republic What is Justice? This is a question that has seemingly haunted human civilization from the dawn of human development to modern day human practice. There are many aspects of justice that can be seen in Old Testament Biblical accounts, the pre-Islamic Arabian notion of justice through retribution, and the early Greek interpretations of justice through the Polis. These are all important historical notions of justice within a certain culture...

    Aristotle, Democracy, Form of government 2948  Words | 8  Pages

  • History of Plato

    The Life of Plato Co-authored with Christopher Planeaux Plato was born around the year 428 BCE into an established Athenian household with a rich history of political connections -- including distant relations to both Solon and Pisistratus. Plato's parents were Ariston and Perictone, his older brothers were Adeimantus and Glaucon, and his younger sister was Potone. In keeping with his family heritage, Plato was destined for the political life. But the Peloponnesian War, which began a couple...

    Apology, Aristotle, Critias 1471  Words | 5  Pages

  • plato

    Wisdom and Ignorance Are They Synonyms? In The Apology, by Plato, Socrates explains who he is and what kind of life he lived; he also identified himself with being wise and having a gift of wisdom. The title though is a bit misleading; it is not to be confused with "apologizing" or "being sorry" for one's actions. It is, Socrates attempt to defend himself and his conduct--certainly not to apologize for it. Socrates used different images or ways to describe wisdom, and that came off as being ignorant...

    Apology, Aristotle, Knowledge 997  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Role of Education in the Republic

    The Role of Education in the Republic Plato wrote the republic in the form of dialogues between Socrates and other citizens of ancient Athens. In this series of conversations Plato through Socrates describes his ideal state. The Republic is a place where philosophy rules and the pursuit of wisdom drives everyone. It is a place of class order, where each person performs the task in which he can do best. However, this state can not exist unless everyone is sure of there position. That is why education...

    Allegory of the Cave, Dialectic, Education 794  Words | 3  Pages

  • Plato and Aristotle’s Forms of Government

    Plato and Aristotle’s Forms of Government Throughout history, the idea of government has always been altered, discussed, and argued due to the many variation philosophers have created. Plato, a well- known philosopher is known for his book The Republic in which he discusses politics and the way society should run in order to achieve a just society. Plato was born into a aristocratic and dominant family. He lived from 428 B.C to 48 B.C. (Dale 22). Throughout his life, Plato never ceased to expand...

    Aristotle, Autocracy, Democracy 2292  Words | 6  Pages

  • The Prince vs. the Republic

    Machiavelli's criticism of Plato's The Republic states that a ruler who possesses an inherent quality of that which is consistently good will never have the authority to rule his or her people successfully. If a ruler always treats his subjects in a manner, which can be qualified as good, then he will ultimately meet his demise, as his subjects will rise against him. Machiavelli claims that it is unrealistic to assume that all the people of a kingdom will conduct themselves in a manner that will...

    Adeimantus of Collytus, Democracy, Glaucon 1009  Words | 3  Pages

  • Noble Lie

    According to Plato the role of a central government is to determine where a person belongs or should be positioned society. This belief seems to stem from the ideals of communism or socialism, but Plato’s ideas have many departures from those schools of thought. In Plato’s Republic labor is organized by a government run education system that identifies the best roles for each citizen. He compliments his theory of government rule with his theory of justice. Plato argues that justice occurs only...

    Communism, Democracy, Government 749  Words | 2  Pages

  • Developing the Definition of Justice in the Republic of Plato

    In the Republic of Plato, Justice has been discussed in the first two chapters. Many conversations are presented either by people engaged in these debates or Socrates himself leading these debates. Individuals engaged in the debates discuss on how can a person be “Just” or “Unjust” to get to the main understanding of “Justice” itself. In particular to be a just person, this justification has to be examined on the political sense, which is basically the definition of justice in the city, and in the...

    Debut albums, Ethics, Justice 1187  Words | 3  Pages

  • Plato

    PLATO ON TRADITION AND BELIEF. 1.Socrates gets Laches to agree to a new definition of courage by arguing that not all cases of courage are a sort of endurance.He asks Laches if he would consider courage to be noble to which Laches replies he would.Socrates then asks him would he consider foolish endurance to be seen as hurtful,to which Laches also agrees.With this in mind Laches agrees to a new definition of courage to include only wise endurance. 2/5 2.They conclude that knowledge...

    Courage, Epistemology, Ethics 579  Words | 3  Pages

  • PLATO THE REPUBLIC

     Sub areas of philosophy Metaphysics – what is? Epistemology – what can I know? Ethics – what ought to be? Logic- what is good reasoning? Plato Student of Socrates There are no recorded teaching of Socrates Plato three different periods- early middle and late Middle- what is ethics and what is morality? Morality- give back to what is due. Is morality the following of a rule or is it something more involved? Do you really achieve obedience by punishing? Thrasymuchas- morality...

    Causality, Existence, God 3296  Words | 11  Pages

  • the republic of plato

    The Republic of Plato Before I started reading Plato's the Republic, I was loathe to admit that reading those philosophy books were gonna really change how I view myself. It was totally a waste of time to read these vague and complicated books. As I went on reading the republic, I saw many similar things that still existed in our society. In the book, Plato prescribes severe dictates concerning the cultural life of the city. He rules out all poverty, with the exception of hymns to the gods and...

    Civilization, Glaucon, Philosopher king 451  Words | 2  Pages

  • City and the Soul - Plato

    analogy and to what extent does the picture of “Platonic justice” that emerges from it differ from conventional justice? Much has been written about the inadequacy of the city-soul analogy in establishing what justice is, and further about how Plato fails to adequately connect his vision of justice to the conventional one and so is unable to address the original challenge. I mean to show that the city-soul analogy is in fact compelling, or at least that is it sufficiently adequate to allow us...

    Argument, Justice, Logic 2107  Words | 6  Pages

  • Plato

    Plato (/ˈpleɪtoʊ/;[1] Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn, "broad";[2] 428/427 or 424/423 BCE[a] – 348/347 BCE) was a philosopher, as well as mathematician, in Classical Greece, and an influential figure in philosophy, central in Western philosophy. He was Socrates' student, and founded the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with Socrates and his most famous student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science.[3] Alfred...

    Aristotle, Ethics, Logic 835  Words | 3  Pages

  • Plato Descartes and The Matrix by Liza Cheek

     Plato, Descartes, and The Matrix Compared and Contrasted and Other Various Contemplations Regarding Reality Liza Cheek Liberty University Plato, Descartes, and The Matrix Compared and Contrasted and Other Various Contemplations Regarding Reality The Matrix movie had many similarities with the readings from Plato and Descartes. All three discussed the scenario in which reality was discovered to be a non-reality. Specifically, in The Matrix, reality that was experienced by multitudes...

    Mind, Reality, Simulated reality 864  Words | 5  Pages

  • Plato

    Tearra Daniel Philosophy 1030 Plato 2/20/2013 Plato was a well-known wrestler, and the name by which we know him today was his ring name. Plato means broad or flat: presumably in this case the former meaning, referring to his shoulder. At his birth in 429 B.C. Plato was given the name Aristocles. He was born in Athens, or on the island of Aegina, which lies just twelve miles offshores from Athens in the Saronic Gulf. Plato was born into one of the great political families of Athens. His...

    Athens, Ontology, Philosophy 1707  Words | 5  Pages

  • Plato

    Reeve, P-Crito 46b). Here, Socrates seems to claim that he does not know anything, so will choose to do what appears to be the best to him through examining. Socrates uses this unique method of examining throughout the books of Apology, Crito and Republic by continuously questioning to figure out what seems the best. Then, the question is, what does he mean by “best” in the statement? I argue that it is neither his life nor his family, but what is just or justice. It seems to me that Socrates’ statement...

    American films, Black-and-white films, Ethics 990  Words | 3  Pages

  • Thoughts on Equality and Society: Plato, Rousseau, and Nietzsche

    1 Thoughts on Equality and society; Plato, Rousseau, and Nietzsche. Equality is the concept of everyone being equal in a certain state, with equality there would be little to no biased opinions, no fighting over wealth, and just a free world where everyone can live amongst one another and still obey the laws without worrying about social structure or who is better than someone else. Many different philosophers have spent years on trying to figure out where inequality first started and what...

    Binary relation, Doing It, Equality 2741  Words | 7  Pages

  • The Republic of Plato

    Socrates and the Crimson Chin Don’t Like In The Republic of Plato, Socrates discusses his view on the virtue of justice and injustice. He believes both injustice and justice are very important parts of virtue that explains the sense of what is right or wrong. Socrates has always told his followers why the sense of justice is such a good thing to learn and never really why injustice will get people nowhere. But in the story, The Republic of Plato, Socrates explains the difference between justice...

    English-language films, Ethics, Friendship 817  Words | 2  Pages

  • plato

     Euthyphro – Plato NAME PHI208: Ethics and Moral Reasoning Instructor date Euthyphro – Plato The discussion between Socrates and Euthyphro is one of the most famous Socratic discussions because of the meaning set behind the actions. This discussion is focused on what is the piety or the holiness asked by Socrates to Euthyphro. Socrates appoints Euthyphro to help him understand what piety is as he admits he does not know, in order to help with his case against...

    Ethics, Euthyphro, Morality 1183  Words | 3  Pages

  • Philosophy of Plato

    By studying Plato’s views on the soul, virtues, and forms, one can understand his outlooks on the individual and natural purpose, or telos. Plato had a teleological worldview, so he believed everything in nature had an end, or purpose. In his famous Allegory of the Cave, along with the Sun and Line analogies, Plato outlines the spiritual and intellectual journey of a human from ignorance into goodness and knowledge, which symbolizes a human reaching his or her purpose. This essay will evaluate Plato’s...

    Cardinal virtues, Epistemology, Ethics 1429  Words | 4  Pages

  • Plato's Republic

    Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle. –Plato Justice and the challenge of the Sophists The premise of Plato’s Republic is indeed a question of morality, as Zeitlin contends (Zeitlan 1997, 3), and a direct challenge to the philosophical ideas proposed by the Sophists who assert that subjective truths, individualism and self-interest is the basis of human nature, and therefore what is moral is relative to ones’ own perception, and justice is what serves the individual’s...

    Democracy, Justice, Leo Strauss 1626  Words | 5  Pages

  • Textual Analysis of the Extract 557a to 561e from Book Viii of the Republic by Plato

    Textual Analysis I will discuss the extract 557a to 561e from Book VIII of the Republic by Plato, arguing that although the points laid out are logical and at least party valid, the overall argument, that the order of the city takes precedence over the freedom or perhaps even the happiness of the people is still in question. This extract specifically looks at Democracy, however in order to analyse this I will first explain its place in the broader argument. Book VIII, following the description...

    Argument, Aristocracy, Democracy 1511  Words | 4  Pages

  • Plato

    Miss Moore was trying to get across, on realization of economic inequity through the eyes of a young girl, is equivalent to Plato and the message he was trying send to the ignorant on how to demonstrate that our senses twist out reality, filter out some data, and reduce our capability to grasp the actual reality. Both “The Lesson” by Toni Cade Bambara and “Myth of a Cave” by Plato share the same idea that each story is dealing with people that don’t face reality and accept life by any matter just by...

    Mind, Prison 998  Words | 3  Pages

  • Confucius And Plato

    Confucius and Plato Confucius and Plato were two of the most respected and widely known thinkers. There philosophies of how people should be governed, what characteristics make for a good leader, and other thoughts have influenced many aspects of the ancient and present world. Confucius and Plato’s ideas have benefited their own civilizations and later civilizations, and they both shared many similarities and differences in their ideas. First, Confucius, a Chinese thinker and the founder of Confucianism...

    Confucianism, Confucius, Education 867  Words | 2  Pages

  • PLato and Education

    Plato and Education by Sultan Muhammad Plato was the earliest most important Greek Philosopher and educational thinker. Plato thinks education as a key for a society and he stress on education, for this purpose he want to go to the extreme level even removing children from their mothers and rise them by the state, he want to identify the skills of the children and give them proper education for that particular skill which they have so they could be become a suitable member of the society and...

    Education, Educational philosophy, Ethics 1813  Words | 6  Pages

  • Critism in Plato

    the worlds greatest philosophers first attempted to find the answers to this question. "As his position takes form in the Republic, Plato claims that only a very few individuals are capable of understanding how human life is to be lived. If it could be done, the rest of us would be best off it we were to let out lives be controlled by such individuals". This position held by Plato has been one of much discussion and disagreement over the years. In this paper I will attempt to give my own insight and...

    Crito, Human, Justice 2599  Words | 6  Pages

  • plato:the Republic

     The Republic: Important ideas and arguments. INTRODUCTION The fundamental aim of the Republic is to define justice. In the pursuit to defining justice Socrates engages in a range of discussions in these discussions many important ideas and arguments are presented. This essay will discuss five of the most important ideas and arguments displayed in the Republic as well as stating the reasons for their importance in Plato’s justice...

    Epistemology, Justice, Logic 1272  Words | 4  Pages

  • Plato: "The Good"

    “The Good” Plato Midterm Paper Plato was one of the most prominent Greek philosophers, influencing the very core of philosophy for years to come. His early analysis of society and its values began the quest for answers to questions of existence and awareness. In “The Republic,” Plato explains the concept of Forms and Ideas while also inquiring on both justice within a person and what exactly makes a person ‘just.’ Plato argued that the human soul innately searched for the Form of Good which could...

    Aristotle, Epistemology, Philosophy 1386  Words | 4  Pages

  • Plato and Aristotle Private Property and The Ability to Rule

    the history of philosophy that have been as influential as the ancient Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle. Aristotle was even a student of Plato’s, having studied under him for over 20 years. However, both men still held opposing views when it came to certain views about how the state should be ruled. One such view was on the ability to own private property and the ability to rule. Plato’s, The Republic and Aristotle’s, the Politics of Aristotle illustrates both philosophers’ ideal states of...

    Aristotle, Communism, Democracy 1543  Words | 4  Pages

  • Plato's Republic- Arguments about Justice

    Right vs. Wrong In Plato’s Republic, Book 1, various interlocutors make arguments on the definition of justice. Cephalus proposes the definition of justice as “speaking the truth and paying whatever debts one has incurred” (Plato, 331c). I will prove Cephalus’ argument true by analyzing the structure and his use of examples, discussing possible errors in his reasoning and finally rebutting those who disagree. Justice is knowing right versus wrong and acting on that understanding. Cephalus begins...

    Argument, Aristotle, Ethics 1397  Words | 4  Pages

  • Aristotle and Plato

    genuinely believed in the notion of analyzing compounds and characteristics of people and their actions. Aristotle, who was a student of Plato, believed in “virtue of character and thought”, which means that virtue results from teaching, experience, and habits rather than Plato's idealism notions of ideas and qualities (pg. 265-266). He believed that peoples noble actions would lead to virtue and that all things in life had an end. That all ends must result in something good, an example would be an...

    Aristotle, Ethics, Human 1352  Words | 4  Pages

  • Plato

    listeners (p. 3). The first is how lying has become so simple, but such a necessity in politics. Socrates thought through his choices when presenting himself to the Athens’ officials and came to the conclusion that it was easier and better for him to lie to them. It’s occasions like these that lead people to find the government to be unjust and corrupt, so they truly should never have been in position to had the power to judge Socrates and his choices to begin with. But Socrates knew of this before...

    Apology, Irony, Philosophy 984  Words | 2  Pages

  • Plato-Machiavelli Comparison

    O.C #2-Machiavelli Though often presented as two ideological opposites, personally I find there to be a lot more similarities between Plato and Machiavelli than usually acknowledged. Obviously there are some sharp contrasts. If one examines the excerpts from Machiavelli’s “The Prince” and Plato’s “The Republic”, it’s easy to conclude that Plato believed it to be essential for a government leader to be just, good, and free from corruption. Whereas Machiavelli’s ideal ruler is less concerned...

    Cesare Borgia, Leo Strauss, Persuasion 592  Words | 2  Pages

  • Criticism of Homer's "The Iliad" by Socrates as depicted by Plato in "The Republic": Censorship

    Plato vs. HomerHomer's Iliad would have been severely criticized by Socrates, as depicted by Plato in The Republic. Plato is critical of Greek literature and mythology and even went so far as to propose a system of censorship in the ideal city. Plato believed myths to be lies and thus the propagation of these lies should be halted in society. In The Republic he wrote, "Whenever they tell a tale that plays false with the true nature of gods and heroes...they are like painters whose portraits bear...

    Achilles, Agamemnon, Apollo 1149  Words | 3  Pages

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