"Participant Observation" Essays and Research Papers

  • Participant Observation

    Introduction All methods involve observation, but participant observation is characterized by the extent to which its advocates insist on observation and interpretation of a situation, informed by an understanding of the situation from the point of view of the participants rather than the observer. An attempt is made to avoid imposing categories from outside. Participant observation is the method of anthropology, although it is used in a wide range of sociological studies when the researcher has 'become...

    Evaluation methods, Participant observation, Qualitative research 1516  Words | 5  Pages

  • Participant observation of Alcoholics Anonymous

    This paper is an attempt to explore the possible research stances available to me involved in participant observation of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) of the Lehigh County. For this field study I chose to be a complete observer. I have to stay in many assignments I've done I never thought I had to study a group of people with a drinking problem, it was quite sad to listen to a young girls story. I felt like some sort of snitch, spying on a serious group of people, so please take this study seriously...

    Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholism, Bill W. 1447  Words | 4  Pages

  • Malinowski's Participant-Observation in Modern Anthropology

    Where does Malinowski’s conceptualization of participant-observation sit in the landscape of modern anthropological fieldwork? A primary objective of the modern ethnographer is to glean insights into the ways people relate to and interact with one another and the world around them. Through participant-observation, Malinowski (1922) offered a valuable tool with which to uncover these insights and understandings, the ethnographer. The ethnographer as research tool has become the basis of much modern...

    Anthropology, Bronisław Malinowski, Clifford Geertz 2223  Words | 6  Pages

  • Examine the Problems Sociologists May Find When Using Participant Observation in Their Research.

    using participant observation in their research. All sociological research methods involve observation, however, according to Hughes participant observations is defined by when the researcher themselves participates in the activities of those he or she is observing and studying. Participant observation is a primary research method in which a sociologist studies a group by taking a role within it and participating in its activities. There are two different types of participant observation. Overt...

    Crime, Criminology, Participant observation 909  Words | 3  Pages

  • Examine The Problems Sociologists May Find When Using Participant Observation In Their Research

    Examine the problems sociologists may find when using participant observation in their research. When sociologists carry out an investigation, they can carry out their research in a number of ways. One way to do this is participant observation. Participant observation is a primary research method in which a sociologist studies a group by taking a role within it and participating in its activities. This approach is referred to as the 'Ethnographic Approach'. Ethnomethodology refers to the use of...

    Cultural studies, Participant observation, Philosophy of science 1095  Words | 2  Pages

  • Using material from Item A and elsewhere, assess the strengths and limitations of using participant observation methods to investigate gang culture.

    Using material from Item A and elsewhere, assess the strengths and limitations of using participant observation methods to investigate gang culture. Item A: Venkatesh was a student at the University of Chicago in 1989 when he became interested in the housing projects surrounding the university where 27,000 people lived. He approached a group of Black youths hanging around a stairwell in one of the project buildings but instead of answering his carefully prepared questions he found himself held...

    Ethnography, Gang, Participant observation 1043  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Cognitive Behavioural Approach to Counselling Therapy.

    The cognitive behavioural approach to counselling therapy. The cognitive behavioural approach to counselling therapy. Participant observation How do we really find out about the way of life of a group of people? One way is to join them – to participate in their daily activities & observe what they say and do. This research method is known as participant observation. It was used by John Howard Griffin (1960) a white journalist who dyed his skin black in order to discover what it was like...

    Anthropology, Bronisław Malinowski, Ethnography 1234  Words | 4  Pages

  • Sociology

    social actions. (Wikipedia, sociology, 2014) One everyday way for sociologist to research and collect data is called participant observation. Having 2 separate participants does this. One is a subjective participant and one is an objective observer. Sometimes these two people/ or groups of people know that they are being observed, and other times they don’t know. This form of observation is usually done over a long period of time. This can be months, years, or even over several generations. The objective...

    Anthropology, Cultural anthropology, Culture 1208  Words | 4  Pages

  • Typology

    the generalizations come alive for readers. Taxonomy Generally, taxonomy is defined as a search for the way that cultural domains are organized. Usually, taxonomy involves drawing a graphical interpretation of the ways in which the individual participants’ moves, from groups and patterns that structure the conversation (Spradley, 1979). Taxonomic analysis is conducted of the roles of one individual as they necessarily relate to other roles of the same individual. Taxonomy analysis shows the conceptual...

    Data, Data analysis, Participant observation 765  Words | 3  Pages

  • comparision of two research papers

    of the data; this gives a broad, generalizable set of findings. Research 1 concludes that there are mixed emotions between customers in the acceptance of ancillary revenue services among airlines. With a sample of 170 people plus conference observations, the research doesn’t offer a core sense that this data will give good overviews of the whole customer attitude and behaviour. Generalisation is basically suggested to be influenced by issues like planned replication, sampling strategies, systematic...

    Participant observation, Psychology, Qualitative research 2223  Words | 7  Pages

  • Data Collection Strategies II: Qualitative Research

    PPA 696 RESEARCH METHODS DATA COLLECTION STRATEGIES II: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH What is Qualitative Research?  Participant Observation  Stages in Participatory Observation  Differences between quantitative and qualitative research  Problems with qualitative studies  What type of field observation to use?    What is Qualitative Research?     Qualitative research is aimed at gaining a deep understanding of a specific organization or event, rather a than surface description of a large sample...

    Educational psychology, Evaluation methods, Focus group 1412  Words | 6  Pages

  • Ethnography in Marketing

    subjects are researched this way the form is typically less structured. It is not laboratory based and subjects are more comfortable in areas they are already familiar with. Ethnography relies on participation as well as observation by researchers. In this method called participant-observation, researchers must be able to participate in an activity and understand the perspective of the individuals being studied as well as observe the subjects to be able to describe them to those not a part of the group being...

    Anthropology, Bronisław Malinowski, Claude Lévi-Strauss 1691  Words | 6  Pages

  • Ethnographic Study: Field Research in a Workplace Setting

    anthropologists for conducting field research. Sociologists tend to use the term field research or participant observation. Ethno means "people" and graphy means "to describe something." Ethnography is describing people and/or their culture from their perspectives. In other words, ethnography describes the meaning of the situation from the point of view of the participants. How do the participants under study make sense of the world in which they are participating? Ethnographers and field researchers...

    Cultural anthropology, Ethnography, Participant observation 1019  Words | 4  Pages

  • Discussion Questions Res/320

    the survey to those of observation. Under which circumstances could you make a case for using observation? The primary advantage to a survey over that of an observation study deals with the actual collection of data. With a survey the data collected is normally known and often is directed to specific answers due to the survey format where observational studies collect data in a haphazard way. However, observation can be a useful tool in certain situations. Observation is a very useful tool...

    Focus group, Interrogative word, Participant observation 625  Words | 3  Pages

  • Research Methods in Context Sociology as

    Model Answer- Participant Observation One strength of using participant observation to investigate the idea that ethnic minorities are treated differently within the education system is that it allows the researcher to join in. They will be placed in the same situation that teachers find themselves in routinely, which will allow them to see things through the teachers eyes. This means that the researcher will be able to see things from the same perspective as teachers. This would allow the researcher...

    Ethics, Ethnic group, Informed consent 957  Words | 3  Pages

  • Focus Groups

    Focus groups usually gather data on diverse ways. Most times the facilitator appoints another researcher to take notes and observations during the course of the discussion and debriefing session (Krueger& Casey, 2000; Mack et al., 2005). The observations help the researchers to obtain a clearer view of the normal day by day activities and settings of the participants, and how they manage or cope with them (Stringer, 2007). The notes taken are then translated into formal reports Focus group discussions...

    Focus group, Participant observation, Qualitative research 883  Words | 3  Pages

  • Analysis of Anthropology Methodologies

    ethnographic research. These field methods can include participant observation, informal interviews, use of key informants, and the genealogical method. The purpose of this paper is to analyze four ethnographic studies, and the methodologies the anthropologists used to complete their study. Participant observation is what cultural anthropology is founded on. "The anthropologist in the field situation strives to achieve the role of participant observer. The ideal role is to participate in the society...

    Anthropology, Bronisław Malinowski, Cultural anthropology 1117  Words | 3  Pages

  • Two broad research methods commonly used in sociology and cultural anthropology are qualitative and quantitative

    group observations, surveys, and census taking. These methods will produce efficient, realistic, logical, and thorough outcomes. A qualitative method used in sociology is participant observation. These subjective observations will focus on an interpretive approach on describing a situation and or a detailed look of a group’s day by day activities, history, personal accounts, and similarities. The result of this method of research communicates a through and detailed description and observation and...

    Anthropology, Participant observation, Qualitative research 1169  Words | 5  Pages

  • Glt1 Task 4

    Qualitative design places the emphasis on direct observation, communication with participants and or analysis of texts to understand the social development while quantitative design frequently relies on statistical analysis of numerous cases. (Wikipedia, 2013). Sociologist approach to data collection is completed by one of several research methods; archival/historical method, content analysis, experimental research, longitudinal study, observation or survey research. (Wikipedia, 2013). ...

    Anthropology, Cultural anthropology, Culture 943  Words | 3  Pages

  • Research Exam

    minimize any differences between the two groups. Before any surveys can be administered, I would need to get IRB approval. This is not very difficult. I would need to provide a project description, assess the risks, and create a consent form for participants. I would run pre-test and post-test surveys. The respondents from the two groups will be asked a set of structured questions and their responses/scores are tabulated with an ID number and their test scores, ranging from 0 to 10. The test scores...

    E-participation, Informed consent, Participant observation 1385  Words | 5  Pages

  • Revision

    2011 9699/22/M/J/11 [Turn over 6 2 A participant observation study involves a researcher becoming a part of a group or community in order to achieve a detailed understanding of its way of life. Gaining access to the group in order to begin the research can be problematic. Some researchers choose to reveal their identity to some or all of the people they are studying. This is known as overt participant observation. In covert participant observation the research is carried out secretly, with...

    Anthropology, Educational psychology, Gender 1177  Words | 6  Pages

  • Qualitative Research Methodology

    descriptions from on-site observations and interviews. Qualitative researchers focus on understanding patterns and themes as stated by the author of Jones International University web site: The real world is complex; qualitative research focuses on the elements of that complexity: emotions, meanings, symbols, motivation, thought processes, feelings, patterns and themes. Qualitative research seeks to make sense of this world by finding meaning through the eyes of participants. (http://www.jonesinternational...

    Participant observation, Psychology, Qualitative research 2022  Words | 6  Pages

  • Examine the view that theoretical issues are the most important factor influencing sociologist’s choice of research methods.

    sociologist’s choice of research methods. Validity is a method that gives a true or genuine picture of what something is really like, which helps the researcher easily find out the truth. Sociologists argue that the use of qualitative methods such as Participant Observation gives a more valid, truthful account as it provides us with a deeper insight through firsthand experience. The next issue that influences sociologist’s choice is reliability which comes from Latin, replica meaning an exact copy of something...

    Participant observation, Psychology, Qualitative research 833  Words | 3  Pages

  • Starbucks Visa Survey

    Greenfield Online to recruit a panel for one of its online surveys. How might you build a sample frame of appropriate participants for future online or phone surveys? Starbucks Duetto Visa card team should recruit a panel of Starbucks Cards users. The sample frame will be all present or past users of Starbucks Cards. The reason why this frame has been chosen is that these participants have already experienced the Starbucks Cards. It is necessary to know how additionally they will value the benefits...

    Bank of America, Credit card debt, Credit cards 817  Words | 3  Pages

  • Qualitative Versus Quantitative

    participatory field observations. This paper will break down both qualitative and quantitative methods individually to explain each one in depth. Also a chart will be included to understand and see the features of each side by side. In conclusion of the paper will be an example of both methods being used to understand how women felt about shopping at QuickStop stores and why. As researchers Ulin, Robinson, and Tolley (2006) have explained, three most common qualitative methods are “participant observation...

    Evaluation methods, Participant observation, Psychology 1319  Words | 5  Pages

  • sociology

    view that sociological research can and should be value free. [25] 2 Assess the view that the concept of childhood is socially constructed. [25] Section B 3 Compare the advantages and limitations of overt participant observation and covert participant observation. [25] 4 Assess the usefulness of questionnaires and interviews in terms of the concepts of validity, reliability, objectivity and representativeness. [25] Section C 5 Assess sociological explanations of the...

    GCE Advanced Level, General Certificate of Secondary Education, Participant observation 283  Words | 3  Pages

  • This Essay Will Demonstrate My Knowledge and Understanding of the Contribution to Qualitative Research to Psychology Through the Discussion of Published Qualitative Research.

    amount of connections between individuals, objects or things, rather than interpreting a person’s social experience. The process of measurement is central to quantitative research because it provides the fundamental connection between empirical observation and mathematical expression of quantitative relationships. The object of quantitative research is to develop and employ mathematical theories or hypothesis pertaining to the phenomena. (Smith et al., 2008) Qualitative research presents a...

    Participant observation, Psychology, Qualitative psychological research 1763  Words | 6  Pages

  • The Meaning of Meanness

    Contrary to the work of theorists who focus on large-scale occurrences and structure; instead of examining large amounts of subjects from disconnected venues, the researchers involved in interaction theory commonly make direct up-close and personal observations of their subjects who are often found in much smaller groups or settings. (Macionis and Plummer 2005, p.p. 29) The idea behind the focus on action or “agency” (Marshall and Scott 2005, p.p. 9) is to provide an insider perspective into the understanding...

    Anthropology, Ethnography, High school 1805  Words | 5  Pages

  • Research Methods in Sociology and Cultural Anthropology

    The same data is collected at each new observation and then combined at the end of the study. These studies that span over a period of years to decades, have the capability to allow collection of a large amount of data over time. Having this additional data can help prove or disprove hypothesis related to changes in the data over time. In Cross Sectional Studies, scientists study a group of individuals with similar traits or characteristics in one observation, at a single time. This method provides...

    Anthropology, Cross-sectional study, Culture 1382  Words | 4  Pages

  • Qualitative Research

    Qualitative research is a generic term for investigative methodologies described as ethnographic, naturalistic, anthropological, field, or participant observer research. It emphasizes the importance of looking at variables in the natural setting in which they are found. Interaction between variables is important. Detailed data is gathered through open ended questions. The interviewer is an integral part of the investigation (Jacob 1988). This differs from quantitative research which attempts...

    Case study, Evaluation methods, Focus group 1357  Words | 5  Pages

  • assignment1 soc109 02

    the new way to create “new forms of expression and new forms of community and new forms of identity.” Wesch and his team started getting on Youtube, and participating in this community to give these consequences. In anthropology, we call participant observation, “is a research method for learning about culture that involves living in a culture for an extended period while gathering data.” (Miller. Page 30) In the study culture, there have some ideas interesting presented by Michael Wesch. First...

    Anthropology, Cultural anthropology, Ethnography 808  Words | 3  Pages

  • Test tset

    6) A sociologist’s study of homeless men on New York’s Sixth Avenue involves hanging out with the homeless men (research subjects) to collect data. This type of methodology is known as a. A survey b. An experiment c. An observation (participant or non-participant) d. A reality show e. All of the above 7) Jasmine has volunteered at a local women’s shelter. While she is volunteering, she is given permission to collect data by asking women the circumstances of their abuse. What method will...

    Anthropology, Émile Durkheim, Hypothesis 433  Words | 3  Pages

  • MRKT 396 Exam 2 Review 1

    lectures, guest speakers, videos, cases, discussions, examples, and required readings. Chapter 5: Exploratory Research Design: Qualitative Research 1. Compare and contrast qualitative and quantitative research. 2. What are focus groups? # of participants? Setting? 3. How are focus groups conducted? 4. Characteristics and roles of focus group moderators? 5. What the steps in planning focus groups? 6. What are the different types or variations of focus groups? 7. Advantages and disadvantages of...

    Causality, Exploratory research, Focus group 598  Words | 2  Pages

  • Ethics in Research

    research. The research process creates tension between the aims of research to make generalizations for the good of others, and the rights of participants to maintain privacy. Ethics pertains to doing well and avoiding harm. Harm can be prevented or reduced through the application of appropriate ethical principles. Thus, the protection of human subjects or participants in any research study is imperative. Violations of human rights in the name of scientific research have been among the darkest events in...

    Business ethics, Ethics, Participant observation 2198  Words | 7  Pages

  • Ethnographic Reseacrh

    factors? Educated observation and participation are the main methods that enable our team to understand user requirements and context of use. Two examples of the ethnographic design approach are shadowing and self-observations. Shadowing is an ethnographic technique to understand a person’s real-time interactions with products, services or process and their shifting contexts and needs over the course of a day. Shadowing often focuses on particular events or tasks participants are willing to share...

    E-participation, Ethnography, Evaluation methods 734  Words | 3  Pages

  • Gathering Research Data Paper

    the goal or purpose behind the proposed research? What type of interview structure would be asked? Why? What are some questions that would be asked? Why? What are some distinct advantages of a qualitative data gathering strategy, such as participant observation, over more quantitative approaches? When conducting survey research, how important is informed consent and confidentiality? Police offices play a vital role in society, ranges from general, daily, proactive patrol activities to specific criminal...

    Constable, Participant observation, Police 1259  Words | 4  Pages

  • THE SCOPE AND NATURE OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

    the research process.  (the above, all in relation to some topic of interest, phenomenon, or object of study)  Subjectivity in the participants and in the researcher is taken seriously.  It’s takes the meaning of experience seriously into account as part of the understanding. QUALITATIVE DATA SOURCES  Observation: as participant; as non-participant  Observational records:     Interviews: structured; semi-structured; unstructured (open)        field...

    Case study, Cultural studies, Evaluation methods 545  Words | 6  Pages

  • Gathering Research Data

    proposed research. The report will explain the discourse pattern it will use as well as the facts to some the questions that will also be used. The report will provide identifiable advantages of the qualitative data gathering strategy, such as participant observation, over other qualitative avenues. It is a general belief that most law enforcement officers choice their professional path because of family members in the same occupation or even that it is family wishes. In a family that has one or more...

    Participant observation, Police, Police officer 1143  Words | 4  Pages

  • Dove Case Study

    a choice when consumers shop for these types of products. Participant observation in the field can allow Dove to interact with consumers, or observe them over time. The problem with qualitative research methods is that they are a “soft science” and there are no quantitative numbers to back up the science involved with the results achieved. The results that we get from the projective techniques, the interviews, and participant observations, do not provide clear resolutions for the marketing department...

    Brand, Brand management, Focus group 1055  Words | 3  Pages

  • GLT1 Task4

    various methods of research. These methods include (but are not limited to) participant observation, cross-cultural comparison, survey research, interviews and historical analysis. In this paper, we are going to take a closer look at two different forms of research used within the field of cultural anthropology. The first method of anthropological research that we will look at is participant observation. Participant observation is an immersion method of research where the researchers immerse themselves...

    Anthropology, Cultural anthropology, Culture 1500  Words | 6  Pages

  • Outline and Evaluate the Use of One Qualitative Method in the Academic Study of Sport

    objective, and ‘detached’ from the subject under investigation within quantitative data said by Gratton and Jones (2004). Moreover, qualitative research is rather the opposite, with the researcher being in place to gather more information from the participants in question. In addition to the previous, Morse, Swanson and Kuezel (2001) believe a quantitative research requires the researcher to carefully define variables that may be quantified with numbers. On the other hand, qualitative research is a more...

    Data analysis, Focus group, Participant observation 1839  Words | 6  Pages

  • Anthropology: The study of humanity.

    field, which is any place where people and culture are found. Participant observation: basic fieldwork method in cultural anthropology that involves living in a culture for a long period of time while gathering data. Key Elements: Living with the people Participating in their everyday life Learning the language. Informed consent: an aspect of fieldwork ethics requiring that the researcher inform the research participants of the intent, scope, and possible effects of the study and seek...

    Anthropology, Cultural anthropology, Cultural relativism 939  Words | 5  Pages

  • research paper

    of Ethnomethodological ethnography According to Helman (2007), two traditions have influenced the evolution of ethnomethodological ethnography: ethnography and ethnomethodology. First, ethnography is an approach that focuses on the prolonged observation and profound exploration of a specific group of people to understand how they organise their everyday activities and how they view their surroundings. In sociology, ethnography is concerned with in-depth exploration an individual’s or group’s intentions...

    Ethnography, Ethnomethodology, Participant observation 1782  Words | 5  Pages

  • Research Planning: Data Collection and Analysis

    people that work on either a paid or volunteer basis. The data collection methods will include participant observations, informal interviews, and open-ended questionnaires. Data Collection and Sampling Strategies The data will be collected during the annual fundraiser by observing the interactions of the donors with the executives, employees, and volunteers that are participating in the fund raiser. Observations of the way each cohort interacts with one another, whether there is respect shown toward...

    Data, Data analysis, Educational psychology 1352  Words | 4  Pages

  • Focus Group Research- Reliability, Validity, Replicability, Generalisability

    statistics theory that takes a score from a sample of behaviors and applies them to the entire possible set of observations The group dynamics which take place in a focus group are central to its success. However, these interpersonal processes may cause problems in the interpretation of focus group data. One problem is that of the ‘censoring’ of dissenting views held by less confident participants within the group. The emergence of dissonant views and perspectives — what Kitzinger (1994b) calls ‘argumentative...

    Focus group, Group dynamics, Participant observation 1925  Words | 6  Pages

  • NUR518 Qualitative study Analysis

    that language reveals a groups cultural knowledge. Identification of Whether Participants and Setting are Consistent with the Qualitative Method Sample and sampling method The participants in this study were selected using the purposive sampling strategy. This type of sampling builds from a volunteer participant base and incorporates the snowballing technique to recruit new participants. By selecting participants that most benefit the study, this becomes purposeful, therefore a purposive sampling...

    Data analysis, Ethnography, Nurse 1513  Words | 8  Pages

  • Quantitative Research

    emotions, feelings and values. The researcher usually interacts directly with the respondents (i.e face-to-face) or by actuallt joining in their everyday activities There are 4 forms of qualitative research: 1) Unstructured interviews 2) Participant observation 3) Case studies 4) Documents Unstructured Interview  Face-to-face interaction process in which the researcher tries to get as much useful information as possible from a respondent or a number of respondents  It can take the form...

    Evaluation methods, Focus group, Interview 557  Words | 3  Pages

  • Sociology Investigation

    confusing. Questionnaires may yield low response / return rate from the target respondents. Interviews are expensive and time-consuming. Page 3 C. Participant observation • Through participant observation, researchers join with people in a social setting for an extended period of time. • Researchers also play two roles, as a participant (overt role) and as an observer (covert role). • This method allows researchers an “inside look” at a social setting. • This research method is also called...

    Participant observation, Positivism, Quantitative research 1075  Words | 6  Pages

  • Scientific Method and Participant Observation Observer

    tradition of sociology is another major source of modern field research . In the late nineteenth century, as social reformers and sociologists turned first to social surveys and then to a more varied methodology based primarily on field observation. What is field observation? Ethnographic research offers an orientation to understand the process and structure of a social setting and employs research techniques consistent with this orientation. It is the study of both explicit and tacit cultural knowledge...

    Ethnography, Evaluation methods, Observation 937  Words | 5  Pages

  • Focus Group

    composition must be considered as well. All participants taking part in a F.G must be homogeneous in the interest of the studied phenomenon (Malhotra & Birks 2006:160). Participants with similar characteristics, which the study is about, make the discussion easier and nicely flowing. 2.1.3 Physical setting When choosing the venue to carry out a F.G it is imperative that the chosen venue must also meet the aspects of the phenomenon at hand and of the participants. Daymon and Holloway (2002:194) state...

    Focus group, Marketing research, Participant observation 1919  Words | 6  Pages

  • nursing research

    2011). The collection of data is carried out by description of lived phenomenal experience by the participant. On the other hand, interviews can be utilized to gather participant’s description related to their experiences, or the participant can provide written or oral self report that briefly describes about their perception and experiences. The researcher should not ask the participant about any details of self report or interview. In order to analyze the collected data, the first principle...

    Ethnography, Grounded theory, Participant observation 775  Words | 3  Pages

  • Research – Methodology and Ethics

    is quantitative research? To begin with, we look at the distinctions between the forms of research. Thus, on first consideration, the use of questionnaires as a research technique might be seen as a quantitative strategy, whereas interviews and observations might be thought of as qualitative techniques. In addition, quantitative and qualitative approaches are strongly associated with objectivity (quantitative) and subjectivity (qualitative). The quantitative research method tends to focus on data...

    Participant observation, Qualitative research, Quantitative research 994  Words | 3  Pages

  • Ethnography

    Ethnographic Research “Ethnographic field research involves the study of cultures, organizations, and society, by observing groups and people as they go about their everyday lives.” Ethnographers do this by going out and “getting close” to the participants for prolonged periods of time in their natural setting. Emerson et al. Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes, p.1 Ethnography moves from the specific to the general. (inductive) Practice of providing ethnographic reports through a thick description---...

    Anthropology, Cultural anthropology, Ethnography 520  Words | 2  Pages

  • Eating Christmas in the Kalahari

    characteristic method called participant observation"(Cultural Anthropology pg48) Researchers trained in cultural anthropology use different methods when they study other cultures. Cultural anthropologists often live for months or years with the people they study. This is called fieldwork. The main method of anthropological research involves long-term, direct observation of and participation in the life of another culture. This practice is also known as participant observation and it gives anthropologists...

    Anthropology, Cultural anthropology, Cultural relativism 906  Words | 3  Pages

  • Socıology

    of fieldwork one is engaged in, structured interviews, statistical sampling and other techniques may be required to varying degrees. Most anthropologists depend on a combination of formal techniques and unstructured participant observation in their fieldwork. Participant observation refers to the informal field methods which form the basis for most fieldwork, whether or not it is supplemented with other 26 Small Places, Large Issues techniques. The aim of this method is to enter as deeply...

    Anthropology, Bronisław Malinowski, Cultural anthropology 2424  Words | 7  Pages

  • Body Rituals Among the Nacirema

    Body Rituals Among the Nacirema Abstract This study examines Horace Miner’s essay “Body Rituals Among the Nacirema. While using the participant observation approach, he gives us a new perspective on the daily behaviors within this group of people. Exploring ethnocentrism and how we view cultures outside of our own. Horace Miner was a professor for the University of Michigan. He sought out to teach young people the importance of cultural anthropology. ("Horace Mitchell Miner - Wikipedia, the...

    Anthropology, Bronisław Malinowski, Cultural anthropology 1097  Words | 4  Pages

  • Ethnology and Ethnography

    diversity. Ethnography and Ethnology both attempt at reaching certain goals. Ethnography is a written description of a culture based on data gathered from fieldwork, characterized by two methods, participant observation and interviews. When an anthropologist is researching through participant observation, they are attempting to study a culture while still trying to maintain the eye of an objective observer. Another form of getting data for ethnography is through interviews. Through interviews, either...

    Anthropology, Bronisław Malinowski, Cultural anthropology 1976  Words | 5  Pages

  • Social Media

    hair and beautiful all over. Data & Methods I am studying how social media affects teenage beauty. I plan to start off using the Qualitative Method. This method is best for my topic because it goes into depth. It allows me to have participant observation, intense interviewing, and also focus groups. My sample is focus groups. I will conduct to situations where I will give open ended questions during one interview. This will allow me to get a discussion started. I will watch how the teenagers...

    Body image, Focus group, Marshall McLuhan 2105  Words | 5  Pages

  • Qualitative Research Critique

    face or telephone calls depending on the participant’s convenience. This method still allowed the researcher to capitalize on any new or early understanding. It gives the researcher flexibility in asking questions to continue on the path that the participants take them in. The research does not show any evidence of reflexivity. The contact number was adequate to understand the phenomena. Sample and setting The population was adequately described in detail. The research included where there participation...

    Focus group, Participant observation, Qualitative research 1459  Words | 5  Pages

  • Qualitative & Quantitative

    thrust or approach of his research. Examples of data-gathering strategies used in Qualitative Research are individual in-depth interviews, structured and non-structured interviews, focus groups, narratives, content or documentary analysis, participant observation and archival research. On the other hand, Quantitative Research makes use of tools such as questionnaires, surveys, measurements and other equipment to collect numerical or measurable data. 4. Type of Data The presentation of data...

    Evaluation methods, Participant observation, Psychology 601  Words | 3  Pages

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