• Adnan
    Charles Brown, a friend with whom Keats was living when he composed this poem, wrote, In the spring of 1819 a nightingale had built her nest near my house. Keats felt a tranquil and continual joy in her song; and one morning he took his chair from the breakfast table to the grass-plot under a...
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  • How Does John Keats Feel About Nature?
    How does Keats feel about nature? If you read through Keats' work it is clear that he loves nature. As he is dying he feels like he is losing everything close to him, his girlfriend, his friends and nature. Nature has become his family and a large and significant part of his life; all Keats...
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  • Analysis of Ode to a Nightingale by Keats
    poem is the wish to escape life through different routes. Although the poem begins by describing the song of an actual nightingale, the nightingale goes on to become a symbol of the immortality of nature. In lines 1-3 Keats expresses a wish to dull and numb his senses artificially. He wishes to...
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  • To Autumn and the Darkling Thrush
    might be because he had a troubled childhood but we can not be sure, he may have just been mature for his age. Both poems contain deep thoughts and feeling about nature, and even how it gives them cause to question their life’s. Keats ode focuses on Autumn, it’s joy “ mellow...
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  • Keats "To Autumn"
    dying, the pleasant and the unpleasant, because they are inextricably one; he accepts the reality of the mixed nature of the world. Keats association between stages of autumn and the process of dying does not take away from the “ode” effect of the poem, three stanzas, each a story of its own, a time...
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  • Literature
    leave the world unseen," he wants to "Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget" everything. He's tired of the pains that human nature has brought: "The weariness, the fever, and the fret . . . hear[ing] each other groan . . . full of sorrow" Keats hits human nature in the heart by taking away...
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  • Ode on a Grecian Urn
    art. The poem explores the transience of the real world and the everlasting nature of the world of art. In the poem Keats describes an Urn he imagines it. He silences the Urn by calling it a “bride of quietness” as he wants to speak for it. The Urn, unravished by time has witnessed many eras (and...
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  • Critical Note: Ode to a Nightingale
    contradictions in meaning ('a drowsy numbness pains') and emotion ('both together, sane and mad') and he accepts a double nature as a creative insight. In ‘Nightingale’ it is the apparent (or real) contradictions that allow Keats to create the sensual feeling of numbness that allows the reader to...
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  • Individualism, Balance and Nature
    particular) as a philosophical and poetic revolt against rationalism. Nature, not just the physicality of nature, but human rational and the balance of life, heavily influenced the writings of the Romantics. In the majority of Keats’ odes, he stresses upon the importance of accepting that with the good...
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  • Indolence, Keats's Muse of Guilt
    . Keats is clearly aware of the contradictory nature of his indolence and describes it in a letter to his brother George and sister-in-law Georgina on 13 March 1819 (Letters 2:77) as having two forms: ‘easy' and ‘uneasy indolence', each being greatly different to the other. But it is Keats's own...
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  • Types of Depression
    One of England’s greatest poets, John Keats was a key element in the Romantic Movement. Known especially for his love of the country and sensuous descriptions of the beauty of nature, his poetry also resonated with deep philosophic questions. He brought the beauty of nature to his poems. John Keats...
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  • John Keats
    on Indolence". "Stirring shades, and baffled beams:" showing a hindrance in nature as the light is not completely being shone through. On a personal level showing that Keats is in darkness with glimmers of hope. Indicating he could have avoided indolence but chooses to remain in the tranquility of...
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  • Jai Hind Baba
    eats' concept of beauty Keats was considerably influenced by Spenser and was, like Spenser, a passionate lover of beauty in all its forms and manifestations. The passion of beauty constitutes his aestheticism. Beauty was his pole star, beauty in nature, in woman and in art. “A thing of beauty...
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  • John Keats - Analysis
    the poem we really get a feel of the world that Keats depicts: SEASON of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run; The idea of man and nature working in harmony...
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  • EXPLORATION OF A CRITICAL APPRECIATION BETWEEN THE REFLECTED CONCEPTS OF 'THE NOW' AND 'THE THEN'-
    well As she is famed to do, deceiving elf!” The lines also reveal Keats’s idea that our imperfect nature is not framed to enjoy the eternal joy and beauty for long. In Ode to a Nightingale Keats in his attempt to share the eternal joy and happiness of the nightingale, escapes into the idyllic...
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  • Ode to a Grecian Urn
    Romantic poets write about nature; however, some poems, like the ones from John Keats, also express other themes like love, art, youth, immortality and beauty. In one of his poems, “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” Keats writes about an ancient urn that has pictures of people on the sides; the poem is about...
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  • The Role of Art in Poetry
    “Forever” throughout this part of the poem. Keats then goes on to addresses the objects he sees on the Urn. In doing this he is telling us what he admires in life and nature as reflected in this artifact. These are things that Keats wishes he could hold onto forever instead of being sickly. He...
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  • Jane Eyre, Hamlet and Keats
    wind" and "half-reaped furrow", (p197) and ends with the remaining baroness in stanza three, "soft dying day" and "stubble plains"(p197). John Keats uses pictorial, sensuous language to convey the very nature of autumn. There are descriptions of landscape and nature throughout. The three stanzas...
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  • Art of Imoortality
    work of art. Similarly, in his poem “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, Keats also uses the theme of nature versus art as symbols of mortality and immortality respectively. “The young in one another’s arms”, and “Fair youth, beneath the trees”, sounds like they are written by the same person. Although the...
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  • salvador dali b
    In Keats, On the Sea we see the transcendence of the sea into a majestically, sacred force. It is not a human ruled asset for our exploitation, leisure or travel; it is God-like power that shows our minute nature against its sublime nature. From this sublime nature, it becomes a God-given source...
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