• Merton's Strain Theory
    Section A Briefly outline and highlight the contribution of Merton’s strain theory to criminology. Robert K. Merton was an American sociologist that wrote in the 1930’s putting out his first major work in 1938 called Social Structure and Anomie. After publication, this piece was we worked and tweaked...
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  • criminology paper
     Strain Theory in Relation to Crime Strain causes people to act against the law, breaking laws to attain their means. Merton’s theory on strain and anomie provides us with reasons for why the offender committed the crime break and enter. Merton’s strain theory shows us that the offender understood...
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  • Causes of Junvenile Delinquency
    Causes of Juvenile Delinquency and Crime Aim This report aims to explore the relationship between juvenile delinquency and poor parenting and their failure to teach norms and values. It will also address other aspects of influence, including; peer pressure, mass media, poverty and the actions of the...
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  • Strain Theory
    How does general strain theory differ from biopsychological theories? “Throughout history, one of the assumptions that many people have made about crime is that it is committed by people who are born criminals; in other words, they have a curse, as it were, put upon them from the beginning. It is not...
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  • Senior
    Are you scared to venture out at night alone? Although crime rates sky rocketed in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s, resulting in an all-time high in the 1980’s, recently crime has taken a significant decline. According to the 2009 Universal Crime Report published by the Federal Bureau of Investigation...
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  • Youth Crime and Justice
    factors as predictors of youth offending. In order to do this, I will be looking at different sociologists theories as far as young offending is concerned and what evidence there is to support these theories. I will then conclude by discussing whether I believe social and cultural factors are important in determining...
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  • the theories of Durkheim, Merton, and Agnew regarding the Functional Theory of Crime; the Theory of Anomie, Merton’s Modes of Adaptation, Strain, and the General Strain Theory
    Emile Durkheim used the structural functional theory of crime to understand the world and why people act the way that they do. Its main thought is that our culture is a whole unit. This unit is composed of interconnected portions. Sociologists who believe theory often focus on the social structure and social...
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  • Bullying
    Gang Violence Theories of Deviance A number of theories related to deviance have emerged within the past 50 years (Clifford, 1960). Five of the most well-known theories on deviance are as follows: 1. Differential-association theory Control theory Labeling theory Anomie...
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  • Robert Merton Anomie THeory
    Meyer R. Scholnick also known as Robert King Merton was born on the 4th of July 2010 in Philadelphia in a Jewish family from Russia that immigrated to the United States of America. He took advantage of the culture riches surrounding him by frequenting nearby cultural and educational venues when he was...
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  • John Gotti Received More Publicity Any Crime Figure, Discuss the Theories Developed by Merton and Sutherland and Compare and Contrast Regarding Which Would Describe Gottis Criminal Development
    Association Theory Differential association theory was Sutherland's major sociological contribution to criminology; similar in importance to strain theory and social control theory. These theories all explain deviance in terms of the individual's social relationships. Sutherland's theory departs from...
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  • Control Theory
    Cristina Collett Dr. Rubenson November 3, 2012 Test #2 Lombroso Theory Cesare Lombroso (1835-1909), the “father of modern criminology” (Mannheim, 1972: 232), drew great attention in the field of criminology during the late part of the 19th Century. Although his ideas were not greatly accepted...
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  • Money Laundering
    Money Laundering 1. What is the deviance/crime, legally what level felony? The crime of money laundering is defined as a “financial transaction scheme that aims to conceal the identity, source, and destination of illicitly-obtained money” (Featherstone & Deflem, 471). It is a federal felony in...
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  • Mr Dan
    s Durkheim’s theory has progressed as a basis of modern theory and policy, it has had to adapt to the values and norms of an immensely modernized and industrialized society. Institutional anomie has become the primary basis to the concept of normlessness and the basis of crime and deviance in accord...
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  • labelling
    Summarise labelling theory and then consider its effectiveness in considering youth crime and anti-social behaviour in contemporary British society Labelling theory is the theory of how applying a label to an individual influences their lifestyle, and how the social reaction to this label influences...
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  • Essay
    Strain Theory of Nathan McCall What causes people to commit crime? This million dollar questions has place many criminologists and researchers searching for answers. In the past decades, people have tried to explain crime by referring to the earliest literature of criminal’s atavistic features to human...
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  • An Overview of General Strain Theory
    General Strain Theory Bryan S. In modern criminological research and debate, general strain theory (GST) remains at the forefront. The aim of this paper is to discuss general strain theory (GST), what it is, and how it came to be. Details on specific research regarding general strain theory, however...
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  • Assess the View That Crime Is Functional
    s Assess the view that crime is functional, inevitable and normal. (33 marks) Within the sociological perspectives of crime and deviance, there is one particular approach which argues that crime is functional, inevitable and normal. This sociological perspective, Functionalism, consists of Emile...
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  • Understanding the Similarities to Strain Theory and General Theory of Crime
    similarities of Strain Theory, & General Theory of Crime Angela Sampson # 2396467 Sociology 345: Social Control Professor: James Chriss Cleveland State University April 30th 2012 Abstract: The purpose is to identify the similarities between Strain theories, and General Theory of Crime. Strain...
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  • sociology
    1) Physiological theories In his book L’Uomo Delinquente Cesare Lombroso argued that criminals were throwbacks to an earlier and more primitive form of human being. He said there were several characteristics, such as large jaws, extra fingers and monobrows which were clear signs that someone was...
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  • First Paper
    William Spengler and the Strain Theory Mohammad Gilani Humber College PFP 201 Amanda Scala Monday, March 25, 2013 William Spengler and the Strain Theory William Spengler Jr. killed two firefighters and severely injured 2 other firefighters and a police officer. Police later found that he...
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