• John Gotti Received More Publicity Any Crime Figure, Discuss the Theories Developed by Merton and Sutherland and Compare and Contrast Regarding Which Would Describe Gottis Criminal Development
    . (Akers: 1996:229) Merton Theory Like many sociological theories of crime, Robert Merton’s strain/anomie theory has advanced following the work of Emile Durkheim. In Merton’s theory anomie is very similar to the very meaning of the word strain, as he proposed anomie to be a situation in which...
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  • Senior
    parenting, socioeconomic status, and other sociological factors. The two most commonly accepted theories of juvenile criminality are the Strain and General Strain theories. The Strain Theory was developed by Robert Merton in 1938 on the basis of Emile Durkheim’s concept of anomie. Under Durkheim’s 1893...
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  • Integrated Theories Describes Crime Better
    , they are likely to respond to this strain through crime. The strains leading to crime, however, may not be linked to goal blockage (or deprivation of valued stimuli) but also to the presentation of noxious stimuli and the taking away of valued stimuli. Strain Theory falls short of attempting to...
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  • the theories of Durkheim, Merton, and Agnew regarding the Functional Theory of Crime; the Theory of Anomie, Merton’s Modes of Adaptation, Strain, and the General Strain Theory
    outcome of behaving in a deviant matter. Merton also that a person could experience anomie, which are the feelings of being disconnected to society. Which is possible when an individual is unable to achieve their institutional goals due to many factors. Lastly, Robert Agnew’s general strain theory...
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  • Robert Merton Anomie THeory
    Criminology One of Merton’s popular contributions in the field of criminology was probably the essay he wrote in 1938 titled Social Structure and Anomie. In his essay, Merton starts out his work by challenging some biological based theory that was popular at that time by arguing that crimes derives from...
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  • Money Laundering
    research needs to be done exploring the various informal methods of money laundering to identify participants and offenders who have thus far gone unnoticed. Bibliography Featherstone, R. & Deflem, M. (2003). "Anomie and Strain: Context and Consequences of Merton's Two Theories." Sociological...
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  • Bullying
    http://www.cliffsnotes.com/study_guide/Theories-of-Deviance.topicArticleId-26957,articleId-26873.html#ixzz0o6bQtYcc Robert Merton and Deviant Behavior: An Explanation of Strain Theory and Merton's Typology of Deviance retrieved May 15 2010 from http://socialanthropology.suite101.com/article.cfm...
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  • Control Theory
    connected to the various strains and stress experienced throughout one’s life (Agnew 1992). This theory engages that likely most crimes are done by individuals who cope to accumulative stressors in a negative manner. Agnew’s (1992) general strain theory of crime and delinquency specifically examines the...
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  • Merton's Strain Theory
    Section A Briefly outline and highlight the contribution of Merton’s strain theory to criminology. Robert K. Merton was an American sociologist that wrote in the 1930’s putting out his first major work in 1938 called Social Structure and Anomie. After publication, this piece was we worked and...
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  • Mr Dan
    , ultimately causing social controls over self serving behavior, like deviance and crime, to be vastly reduced. Inherently in its nature, institutional anomie theory has some similarities to Robert Merton and Robert Agnew’s strain theory of crime and deviance. Strain theory asserts that there is a...
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  • An Overview of General Strain Theory
    . Journal of Health & Social Behavior, 41(3), 256-275. Retrieved from EBSCOhost. Baron, S. W. (2007). Street Youth, Gender, Financial Strain, and Crime: Exploring Broidy and Agnew's Extension to General Strain Theory. Deviant Behavior, 28(3), 273-302. doi:10.1080/01639620701233217 [Cole, Stephen...
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  • Strain Theory
    How does general strain theory differ from biopsychological theories? “Throughout history, one of the assumptions that many people have made about crime is that it is committed by people who are born criminals; in other words, they have a curse, as it were, put upon them from the beginning. It is...
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  • Assess the View That Crime Is Functional
    , looting, drive-by shootings and sexual assault. In opposition, to the argument that crime is functional, inevitable and normal, Robert Merton's strain theory is contradictory to his statement. He used the term 'strain' to describe a lack of balance and adjustment in society. When attributing this...
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  • Essay
    Strain Theory of Nathan McCall What causes people to commit crime? This million dollar questions has place many criminologists and researchers searching for answers. In the past decades, people have tried to explain crime by referring to the earliest literature of criminal’s atavistic features to...
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  • Deviance and Social Control
    . Not everyone has equal access to society's institutionalized means, the acceptable ways of achieving success (Henslin 2005: pg. 143). The strain theory was developed by sociologist Robert Merton. People who feel strain are more likely to feel a sense of normlessness. Mainstream norms such as work and...
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  • labelling
    Summarise labelling theory and then consider its effectiveness in considering youth crime and anti-social behaviour in contemporary British society Labelling theory is the theory of how applying a label to an individual influences their lifestyle, and how the social reaction to this label...
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  • Provide a Robust and Critical Definition of Gangs Using Relevant Theoretical Perspectives
    agree with Merton’s (1938) strain In his theoretical approach, (which arose from Durkheim’s theory of anomie, and the impact society had on individuals) Merton explains that the assumption that society has on culturally valued goals, culturally valued means and goals which are based on shared...
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  • Understanding the Similarities to Strain Theory and General Theory of Crime
    , and General Theory of Crime. Strain was developed from the work of Durkheim and Merton and taken from the theory of anomie. Durkheim focused on the decrease of societal restraint and the strain that resulted at the individual level, and Merton studied the cultural imbalance that exists between goal...
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  • sociology
    which he said caused crime in society. Consider it like someone losing in a card game, and the expectation for them to win is so high that they break the rules in order to do so. Merton said there are five ways in which members of American society could respond to this strain to anomie: 1...
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  • First Paper
    basically, Agnew added more factors to the original strain theory that may contribute individual criminal behavior. General strain theory expands the variables of the original strain theory created by Robert Merton. One of the main variables that Agnew added was that crime is committed because of three...
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