• Absalom and Achitophel
    Absalom and Achitophel as a Political Satire Satire is a form of literature, the proclaimed purpose of which is the reform of human weaknesses or vices through laughter or disgust. Satire is different from scolding and sheer abuse, though it is prompted by indignation. Its aim is generally...
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  • Raju
    d Achitophel, published anonymously in November 1681, is one of the finest English political satires. It was intended by its writer Dryden to rouse popular feeling against Shaftesbury and to secure his indictment. The essential theme of the poem is the origin of several fractions against the government...
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  • Dryden as a Poet
    John Dryden (9 August 1631 – 1 May 1700) was an eminent English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles as the Age of Dryden. Walter Scott called him "Glorious John."...
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  • Dryden as a Satairist
    Dryden as a Satirist Introduction: Dryden is one of the greatest English satirists. He is the first practitioner of classical satire which after him was to remain in vogue for about one hundred and fifty years. From the very beginning of his literary career Dryden evinced a sharp satiric bent. He translated...
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  • The Life and Works of John Dryden
    The Life and Works of John Dryden John Dryden was considered the most influential man of literature in the second half of the 17th century. He was the first of the great English neo-classical poets. He was well known for his poems, drama, and criticism. He called himself Neander, the "new man...
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  • Absalom and Achitophel
    Political Satire: Absalom and Achitophel, Part I. It would not serve any purpose to dwell upon the general morigeration of Dryden, who, in this as in other respects, was “hurried down” the times in which he lived, to the leaders of politics and fashion, to the king’s ministers, favourites and mistresses...
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  • Modern Drama
    experiments and holy meditations of Robert Boyle, the hysterical attacks on theaters from Jeremy Collier, and the pioneering of literary criticism from John Dryden and John Dennis. The period witnessed news become a commodity, the essay developed into a periodical art form, and the beginnings of textual criticism...
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  • Country Wife
    JOHN DRYDEN, 1631-1700. No other English literary period is so thoroughly represented and summed up in the works of a single man as is the Restoration period in John Dryden, a writer in some respects akin to Ben Jonson, of prolific and vigorous talent without the crowning quality of genius. Dryden, the...
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  • Role of Dryden
    ABOUT THE LIFE OF JOHN DRYDEN JOHN DRYDEN was born at Aldwinkle, Northampton shire, in 1631. He came of a Puritan family, which had been for years very active in the political world. Dryden was sent to school at Westminster. He published some verses at the age of eighteen. In 1650 he entered Trinity...
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  • ciao
    writing five dramatic masterpieces: Tamburlaine the Great, Doctor Faustus, The Jew of Malta, Edward II, Dido, Queen of Chartage. The most important themes of his work are: the lust for power, the desire to surpass the old restrictions of the Church, the limitation of knowledge. Marlowe’s work also represent...
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  • John Dryden
    John Dryden John Dryden was an influential English poet, dramatist, literary critic, playwright and translator. He is best known for his literary efforts in the Restoration period. John Dryden was born on 9 August, 1631 in Aldwinkle, Northamptonshire, England. He was the eldest of fourteen children...
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  • Mac Flecknoe
    A. John Dryden’s Mac Flecknoe, as part of his corpus of satirical verse, is a short piece, and not as overtly political as, say, Absalom and Achitophel. It does aim to censure through indirect ridicule rather than direct condemnation, but, being a censorious poem directed specifically at an...
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  • John Dryden
    John Dryden, an English poet and dramatist who would dominate literary efforts of The Restoration was born on August 19, 1631, in Aldwinkle, Northamptonshire, England. He received a classical education at Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge, then moved to London in 1657 to begin his career...
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  • Ba Part-2
    Dryden the poet is best known today as a satirist, although he wrote only two great original satires, Mac Flecknoe (1682) and The Medall (1682). His most famous poem, Absalom and Achitophel (1681), while it contains several brilliant satiric portraits, unlike satire comes to a final resolution, albeit...
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  • English Literature
    By P Baburaj Senior Lecturer Dept. of English Sherubtse College, Bhutan MAC FLECKNOE - John Dryden In Restoration period, in 1660 was a nation divided against itself. The plague of 1665- 70,000 people died in London alone. In September 1666- The Great fire of London.13, 000 houses destroyed....
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  • British Literature
    Writers of the Neoclassical Period John Dryden Dryden (1631-1700) was an English poet and dramatist. Some of his famous poems include "Astrea Redux," "Absalom and Achitophel," and "The Hind and the Panther." He is also known for his play All for Love. Dryden was the British poet laureate from 1670 to...
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  • John Drydon-Hassan-Wikipedia.Org
    For other people named John Dryden, see John Dryden (disambiguation). John Dryden (9 August 1631 – 1 May 1700) was an influential English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary...
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  • Essays
    Died: November 8, 1674, Chalfont St Giles, United Kingdom  Full name: John Milton  Parents: John Milton  Plays: Samson Agonistes THE Age of Dryden” seems an expression as appropriate as any description of a literary period by the name of a single writer can be, and yet, in one sense, it is a misnomer...
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  • victorian novel & poetry
    creative faculty of the writers with their free expression of the imagination and emotion that touch the reader of all Ages and of all age. Compare Dryden & Pope as verse satirist. Satire: Satire originally means a poetical composition with an aim to expose and ridicule the follies or vices of some...
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  • King Lear
    Earl of Dorset;[3] it was later adapted to the libretto for Henry Purcell's opera Dido and Aeneas (1689?).[4] The Loyal General, with a prologue by Dryden, played at the Dorset Garden Theatre in 1680.[3] Tate then turned to make a series of adaptations from Elizabethan dramas. His version of William...
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