• Absalom and Achitophel
    vices of an age, or the defects of an individual or the follies common to the very species of mankind. Absalom and Achitophel is a landmark political satire by John Dryden. Dryden marks his satire with a concentrated and convincing poetic style. His satiric verse is majestic, what Pope calls: “The...
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  • Raju
    d Achitophel, published anonymously in November 1681, is one of the finest English political satires. It was intended by its writer Dryden to rouse popular feeling against Shaftesbury and to secure his indictment. The essential theme of the poem is the origin of several fractions against the...
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  • Dryden as a Poet
    his satirical and didactic poems, notably Absalom and Achitophel, The Hind and the Panther, and Religio Laici. In poems such as these, Dryden displayed an irrepressible wit and forceful line of argument which later satirists adopted as their model. Absalom and Achitophel, verse satire published in...
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  • Dryden as a Satairist
    of Absalom and Achitophel chiefly written by Nahum Tate and including about 200 lines by Dryden. (3) The Medal. (4) Mac Flecknoe. Dryden's Contribution and Place: Dryden as a satirist does not fall in with native English tradition of Langland. Gascoigne, Donne, Lodge, Hall, Marston, Cleveland, etc...
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  • The Life and Works of John Dryden
    (Magill 534). In 1681, he wrote his first and some say, greatest poem of his career. Absalom and Achitophel is a parable written in heroic couplets. There is said to be evidence that the King himself asked Dryden to write the poem. He uses the Biblical story of David and his rebellious son...
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  • Absalom and Achitophel
    Political Satire: Absalom and Achitophel, Part I. It would not serve any purpose to dwell upon the general morigeration of Dryden, who, in this as in other respects, was “hurried down” the times in which he lived, to the leaders of politics and fashion, to the king’s ministers, favourites and...
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  • Country Wife
    to have Shaftesbury arrested on the charge of treason. Hereupon Dryden, at the suggestion, it is said, of the king, and with the purpose of securing Shaftesbury's conviction, put forth the First Part of 'Absalom and Achitophel,' a masterly satire of Shaftesbury, Monmouth, and their associates in the...
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  • Role of Dryden
    essays as well as translations of works by Virgil, Chaucer, and Boccaccio. Today he is also highly regarded for his satirical and didactic poems, notably Absalom and Achitophel, The Hind and the Panther, and Religio Laici. In poems such as these, Dryden displayed an irrepressible wit and forceful...
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  • Modern Drama
    , like Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel, seemed to praise the king for his actions in the meal tub plot. Otway's play had the floating city of Venice stand in for the river town ofLondon, and it had the dark senatorial plotters of the play stand in for the Earl of Shaftesbury. It even managed to...
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  • Mac Flecknoe
    in Criticism, Vol. xix, 1969, No.1 Wilding, Michael. “Dryden and Satire: ‘Mac Flecknoe, Absalom and Achitophel, the Medall’, and Juvenal”. In Earl Miner (ed.), John Dryden, London: G. Bell and Sons, 1972 -------------------------------------------- [ 2 ]. Hammond, Paul. Flecknoe and Mac...
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  • John Dryden
    masterpieces as Absalom and Achitophel. However, he continued to write for the theatre, producing such plays as Don Sebastian (1689), the story of a king who abdicates his throne after discovering that he has committed incest, and Amphitryon (1690), a brilliant retelling of the classic myth. He also adapted...
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  • Ba Part-2
    Dryden the poet is best known today as a satirist, although he wrote only two great original satires, Mac Flecknoe (1682) and The Medall (1682). His most famous poem, Absalom and Achitophel (1681), while it contains several brilliant satiric portraits, unlike satire comes to a final resolution...
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  • John Dryden
    "Marriage A-la-Mode" became successful. Later, after the Restoration, Dryden turned to poetry, although he did not stop writing plays. He became one of the leading poets that day. He wrote one of his best poetry works such as "Absalom and Achitophel" - a landmark poetic political satire. Dryden...
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  • Essays
    .” 64  Political Satire: Absalom and Achitophel, Part I. It would not serve any purpose to dwell upon the general morigeration of Dryden, who, in this as in other respects, was “hurried down” the times in which he lived, to the leaders of politics and fashion, to the king’s ministers, favourites...
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  • British Literature
    include "Astrea Redux," "Absalom and Achitophel," and "The Hind and the Panther." He is also known for his play All for Love. Dryden was the British poet laureate from 1670 to 1689. John Locke Locke (1631-1704) was an English philosopher who wrote the essay "Concerning Human Understanding." He believed...
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  • English Literature
    possible. The effect of this on the reader is to rethink the validity of those values, as seen in the light of the satiric humor. The register of royalty is not the only theme exploited by Dryden throughout "Mac Flecknoe" for the sake of humor and the reformation of the values of his contemporary...
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  • ciao
    II, a catholic king. Dryden’s poetic production includes Absalom and Achitophel, it is a political satire on the succession to the throne of England; Charles II had not legitimate heir except his younger brother James, who was a catholic. Protestant Whig opposition found its own candidate for the...
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  • John Drydon-Hassan-Wikipedia.Org
    belittling form of satire, but rather one which makes his object great in ways which are unexpected, transferring the ridiculous into poetry.[10] This line of satire continued with Absalom and Achitophel (1681) and The Medal (1682). His other major works from this period are the religious poems Religio...
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  • jacobian era
    a playwright but became the foremost poet and critic of his time. His greatest works are satirical narrative poems, notably Absalom and Achitophel (1681), in which prominent contemporary figures are unmistakably and devastatingly portrayed. Another satiric poet of the period was Samuel Butler, whose...
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  • victorian novel & poetry
    his satire. He is acknowledged unequivocally as the first great satirist in English poetry. He is given a dignified place in the temple of poetic fame for his principal satires- Absalom and Achitophel (1681-82), The medal and Mac Flecknoe (1682), the first two are political satire and Mac Flecknoe...
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