• It Is a Constant Image of Your Face
    This poem is a typical Dennis Brutus poem. As is characteristic, he compares his love for South Africa, to the love he has for some other person. Maybe, a woman! He opens the poem by saying ‘the constant image’ (line 1) of his woman’s face and the ‘grave attention’ (line 3) of her eyes which...
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  • Story Writing
    poets of the Twentieth Century. War is not worth it, as Owen proves with the lie perpetuated across the world: Sweet and fitting it is to die for one's country. Analysis of the poem “It is the constant image of your face” This poem is a typical Dennis Brutus poem. As is characteristic, he...
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  • Guidestudies
    Simmons-McDonald The Woman Speaks to the Man who has Employed her Son – Lorna Goodison It is the Constant Image of your FaceDennis Brutus God’s Grandeur – Gerard Manley Hopkins A Stone’s Throw – Elma Mitchell Test Match Sabina Park – Stewart Brown Theme for English B – Langston Hughes...
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  • Cxc English B
    Westminster Bridge – William Wordsworth ü Orchids – Hazel Simmons-McDonald ü The Woman Speaks to the Man who has Employed her Son – Lorna Goodison ü It is the Constant Image of your FaceDennis Brutus ü God’s Grandeur – Gerard Manley Hopkins ü A Stone’s Throw – Elma Mitchell ü Test Match Sabina...
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  • Julius Caesar - Scene by Scene Analysis
    Brutus and Cassius follows. Brutus is Caesar’s best friend, and Cassius is a malcontent general of Caesar’s. The general idea of the discussion is that Cassius is trying to convince Brutus to not be content with Caesar being all-powerful. • Cassius asks Brutus, “Can you see your face?” Here he is asking...
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  • Julius Caesar Act1 Scene 1
    in the streets. The mirror, so often invoked in other Shakespearean plays, is also a significant image in Julius Caesar. For example, Cassius asks Brutus, "Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face?" (1.2.53). He continues, "That you have no such mirrors as will turn / Your hidden worthiness...
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  • Julius Caeser
    me, good Brutus, can you see your face? BRUTUS No, Cassius; for the eye sees not itself, But by reflection, by some other things. CASSIUS 'Tis just: And it is very much lamented, Brutus, That you have no such mirrors as will turn Your hidden worthiness into your eye, That you might see your...
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  • Julius Caesar
    this breast of mine hath buried Thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations. Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face? BRUTUS. No, Cassius, for the eye sees not itself But by reflection, by some other things...
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  • Conflicting Persp.
    the dogs of war". Antony  (Act III, Sc. I). "Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more".  Brutus (Act III, Scene II). "As he was valiant, I honour him; but, as he was ambitious, I slew him" . (Act III, Sc. II). "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury...
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  • Julius Caesar
    encouraged to note. “Then, Brutus, I have much mistook your passion—by means whereof this breast of mine hath buried thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations…. “Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face, now?” “No, Cassius; for the eye sees not itself but by reflection in some other thing...
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  • Julius Caesar Shakespear
    mine hath buried Thoughts of great value, worthy cogitations. Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face? BRUTUS. No, Cassius, for the eye sees not itself But by reflection, by some other thing. CASSIUS. 'Tis just: And it is very much lamented, Brutus, That you have no such mirrors as will...
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  • Brutus V Caesar
    two leading characters that essentially define the themes of the play and enhance them. Despite the constant struggle the audience faces as to whether they should support Brutus in light of the fact that he betrays his best friend and brutally murders him, we seem to find his character more likeable...
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  • Julius Caesar
    of which he counts Cassius as one. Cassius now concedes that he must have misinterpreted Brutus' behavior and now Cassius asks Brutus "can you see your face?" (Line 51). Brutus replies no, since an eye cannot see itself. Cassius now agrees, adding that this is a shame for it prevents Brutus from...
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  • Types of People in the World
    Phillipi? 8. Brutus uses imagery about the sea and ships to insist that the time is right to march to Phillipi. Explain the image in your own words. 9. Again, Brutus has over-ruled Cassius. List Cassius’ earlier suggestions that Brutus did not follow, to his detriment. ll. 243-310 The tone changes...
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  • Algebra in Day to Day Life
    that the poems using that view are better as they are more powerful and display strong images about time…(to be continued) The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Question 5: Using the words given above rewrite Part1 of the poem in your own words. The first stanza has been done as...
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  • Julius Caesar
    to face death head-on, to die bravely and honorably, is Caesar’s best course: in the end, Brutus interprets his and Cassius’s defeat as the work of Caesar’s ghost—not just his apparition, but also the force of the people’s devotion to him, the strong legacy of a man who refused any fear of fate and...
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  • Caesar
    paradox; in order to preserve the image of his ancestor Junuius Brutus, Brutus has to kill his ancestral father Julius Caesar, a man whom he admires as “the foremost man of all the world” (4.3.22).33 Caesar’s ghost, which haunts Brutus in 4.3.275– 85, reminds us, indirectly, of the disastrous...
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  • Caesar Info
    affect his friendships. Cassius and Brutus speak together. Cassius asks Brutus if Brutus can see his own face; Brutus replies that he cannot. Cassius then declares that Brutus is unable to see what everyone else does, namely, that Brutus is widely respected. Noting that no mirror could reveal Brutus's...
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  • Shakespeherpaper
    , can you see your face? </CASCA> <BRUTUS> <6%> No, Cassius; for the eye sees not itself, But by reflection, by some other things. </BRUTUS> <CASCA> <6%> 'Tis just: And it is very much lamented, Brutus, That you have no such mirrors as will turn...
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  • African Poetry
    ..... That is Africa your Africa  That grows again patiently obstinately And its fruit gradually acquires The bitter taste of liberty. (Narasimhaiah, 153) Dennis Brutus, a South African poet, was subjected to torture by a cruel regime. His writing is full of images of love contrasted with images of...
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