• Henry and Martin Unjust Issues
    felt when he said, "Your money is your life, why should I haste to give it my money?". How you deal with them if you do not approve of them is the question. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. I think he figured like the sun rises every morning there will be...
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  • Thoreau's Civil Disobedience
    the law dictated by the majority but rather do what they believe is right. He contends that when a government is unjust, people should refuse to follow the law and distance themselves from the government in general. According to Thoreau, if the government is an unjust institution than one does not...
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  • Transcendentalism in Civil Disobedience
    it. In his view, to know of a moral or higher law creates an obligation to obey it. This can obviously entail political action as many a truth can form a situation that does not apply to it, and therefore needs to be altered. Thoreau is, however, widely received as a passive theorist when it comes...
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  • Civil Disobedience Analysis
    as a moral wasteland of sorts; one where the majority of men are not ready to change, and the minority who want change do not know how to go about obtaining the change they seek (245). We live in a society deprived of the luxury of community. Thoreau states, “for government is an expedient by which...
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  • Ralph Beachum
    may well ask: ‘How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others’? The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust” (King 366). Here again, King suggests his methods of civil disobedience to those skeptics: “If today I lived in a communist nation, against the...
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  • Civil Disobedience
    seeking a way for the conscientious individual to deal with such issues, Thoreau offers a meditation on timeless and absolute principles that, he feels, should guide the moral person. The substance of the author's argument is that each person has a duty to follow conscience rather than law when the two...
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  • Civil Disobedience and Other Essays Response Questions
    beat down the union. Therefore using one form of unorganized legislature that they don't even agree with to try and banish another. Thoreau states that there is a simple solution to this problem: stop following and feeding either government. • "Unjust laws exist: shall we be content to obey...
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  • Bartleby and Civil Disobedience
    difficult chores. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s interpretation of an unjust law is, “a code that a numerical or power majority group compels a minority group to obey but does not make binding on itself” (Jacobus 159). The injustice described here by King also does not match the...
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  • Civil Disobedience
    shared many beliefs in many of the same subjects concerning Civil Disobedience, they had many different views on how the government should work and how the citizen should be treated by society. Both Martin Luther King Jr. and Thoreau believed that one should act out against an unjust law by means of...
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  • Bartleby and Civil Disobedienc
    morals. Bartleby is merely a lonely guy who does not wish to work and has nothing to do with civil disobedience. Thoreau says that if injustice "is of such a nature that it requires you to be the agent of injustice to another, then I say break the law" (Jacobus 134). He is personally giving...
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  • On Civil Disobedience Abstract
    of a “corporation” – as it is those beliefs that maintain morality in such an emotionless entity. Law does not encourage morality; it encourages false accusations and needless persecution of immorality. When the law is broken, moral men are forced to act against their beliefs and common sense to...
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  • Martin Luther King Jr. and Henry David Thoreau
    The essays by Martin Luther King Jr., “Letters From Birmingham Jail” and Henry David Thoreau, “Civil Disobedience” show how one can be a civil person and protest against unfair, unjust laws forced upon them. Both authors are very persuasive in their letter writings. Henry David Thoreau and Martin...
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  • King vs.Thoreau
    think he figured like the sun rises every morning there will be unjust laws. How you deal with them if you do not approve of them is the question. Thoreau asks, will you be happy to just obey the law for as long as it takes to change the law by the government's rules?Do you want immediate acton...
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  • Civil Disobedience Martin Luther King David Thoreau La Riot
    considerably since the time of Thoreau. Despite this, there still was a double standard that people of different races had to deal with. The answer to the question whether one should disobey an unjust law is yes. One should stand up for what he believes in, and not have anyone else dictate to him...
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  • Comparing Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King on Unjust Laws
    States has faced in building a government, this topic has been a popular discussion throughout American literature. Although they did not live during the same time, American writers Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. each wrote about how a person should not follow laws that they believe...
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  • Civil Disobedience
    people to think and take their own approach to a situation. Thoreau definitely had many of the ideas of how to deal with unjust laws performed by government. Thoreau inspired reform and also overturned many unjust laws and customs in our country. We, as a society, should look at this man as heroic...
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  • Civil Disobedience
    away with the law all together when the legal system becomes unjust. Thoreau then states that the United States is a perfect example of an unjust government. He believes that is because of the fact that they have shown support of slavery and they have participated in the practice of aggressive war. In...
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  • Transcendentalists
    corrupt or unjust, but that the government is the proxy of corruption and injustice. He says that the verdict of a person's morality is not essentially lesser to the decisions of a political body or majority, and so it is not necessary to promote an approval for the law, so much as for the right. Henry...
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  • Thoreau Today
    me more that he would fight against our system and judge it harshly were he still alive. Whether because of the emphasis on majority vote, or undefeatable unjust laws, he would surely not favor our government amongst others. Thoreau today would encourage civil disobedience and fight against the rules that he does not agree with just as he did back then....
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  • Henry David Thoreau
    responsibility. It urged the individual to follow the dictates of conscience in any conflict between itself and civil law, and to violate unjust laws to invoke their repeal. Throughout his life, Thoreau protested against slavery by lecturing, by abetting escaped slaves in their decampment to freedom in...
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