• Virtue and Relativism
    Discussion #1 Give an example of something that one culture might regard as a virtue that another culture might not. Explain why this could lead to relativism. Be sure to support your answer with quote from the text and/or academic resources. Responds to the question below in approx 100 words...
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  • Cultural Relativism Theory and Virtue ethics
    or culture. Second, is that we could decide whether actions are right or wrong just by consulting the standards of our society and this might be simple because anyone can just ask whether their action is in accordance with the code of one’s society. Also this forbids us to criticize our own culture...
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  • Moral Relativism
    that it objectively has no value. It may do for me even though it does for you. b. Eating meat might be wrong for you and bad for me i. One cannot establish categorically that something is wrong or not. 2. Ethical relativism is then very tolerant – “To each his own”. You don’t go...
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  • Ethical Cultural Relativism
    objections truly do show many people that Ethical Cultural Relativism has its flaws so it cannot be a true theory. If the person were to ask why certain societies have broad differences in behavior one could explain it fairly easily. When someone is born into a culture they usually accept the given...
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  • Ethics final exam notes
    visionary companies" , commitment to customers, employees, product and innovation. Examples: HP, Proctor and Gamble, Walt Disney values= beliefs or standards that incline us to act or to choose in one way rather than another- help decision making good ethics seem to be connected to good business...
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  • Gay Marriage
    Posting Due by Day 3. Relativism. Give an example of something that one culture might regard as a virtue that another culture might not. Explain why this could lead to relativism. Your initial post should be at least 150 words in length. Support your claims with examples from required material(s...
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  • Criticisms Against Ethical Theories
    . Criticisms of Utilitarianism • Distastefulness By far and and away the most common criticism of utilitarianism can be reduced simply to: "I don't like it" or "It doesn't suit my way of thinking". For an example of this, here's something from someone who might prefer to remain nameless...
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  • Gjgjgjg
    involve going one way -- from theory to applied issue.Ý Sometimes a case may suggest that we need to change or adjust our thinking about what moral theory we think is the best, or perhaps it might lead us to think that a preferred theory needs modification. Another important distinction: Are moral...
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  • Ethics
    standing) in which it is argued that moral and/or ethical values are not universal but rather context dependent. For instance, cultural anthropologists -usually inclined to certain degree of moral relativism- say that something one culture might consider highly valuable (i.e. virginity, freedom or honesty...
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  • Philosophy
    times and spaces  different circumstances (for example, in one place there is a problem of overpopulation, in another the problem is drought, in other places the standard of living is high) may lead to different moral values. Skepticism: it is impossible to know something  does uncertainty prove...
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  • Utilitarianism
    realize that everything is humbug. This also explains why relativists often think of themselves as sophisticated compared to people who haven’t gotten over the idea of ‘absolute truth’. Relativism might even seem to be a way of protecting yourself against being deceived by humbug, since it makes it...
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  • mirror mirror on the wall-cultures consequences in a value test of its own design
    disdain for apartheid was at its peak, it begged an explanation. Referring to apartheid in this latter book, Hofstede retreated from the claim that the sample represented entire national cultures by saying that the finding “at least explains why part of the South African whites reject apartheid...
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  • Ethics Notes
    or culture [cultural relativism]. - Some things are just plane wrong regardless of cultural or moral difference (genocide for instance). WILLIAM SUMNER argued that because cultures have different values we can’t argue that one cultural moral values are more “right” than another. “If I...
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  • sociology article
    not being able to understand why these Aussies go to the shops barefoot (for example). As there are so many different cultures in Australia, one might wonder if we can speak about Australian values in generaL Neverthe­ less, this section will explore two strong values in Australia...
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  • Singer
    Rachels’ own work in ethics lived up to that precept. To give just one of many possible examples, in what is probably his most cited article, on ‘‘Active and Passive Euthanasia,’’ he set out to criticize the common intuition that killing is worse than letting die. He showed that this distinction is...
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  • Theories
    of view or the tradition of a particular culture. Individual moral relativism is a radical view, which could go as far as being amoral: one just does whatever one thinks is right, without regard to other points of view. Cultural moral relativism is not so radical and is very...
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  • Utilitarianism
    . The Divine Command theory, Cultural Relativism, and Kantianism are all too flawed or too ambiguous to give Jim an answer. The Utilitarian answer is the most fair and comprehensible. Jim should shoot one Indian to save the lives of the nineteen others because this creates the outcome with maximum...
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  • Class Notes
    virtue ethicist might respond to the embezzlement problem as follows:  sure, I could take the money, and I might get away with it.  But it would be like taking candy from a baby -- easy enough, but a very unworthy act that would make me a less worthy person.  As one student said, if I took the money...
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  • Iwc1 Literature, Arts and Humanities
    . Question 8: Multiple Choice This philosopher is best known for his argument that a life guided by reason and virtue would lead to happiness. a) Aristotle b) Confucius c) Epicurus d) Democritus Feedback: The correct answer is a. Aristotle is best known for for his argument that a life guided...
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  • Midterm Notes
    explain the following: * The role of science in ethics * How can science inform ethics? * What are the limits of this role? * The main insights of and objections to ethical subjectivism and cultural relativism * Main Objections * No recommendations for...
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