• Bwap
    or digression to address a person (distant or absent) directly, e.g. "Save me ... ye heavenly guards!" (HAMLET); "O Come Sisters Three [the 3 Fates], come, come to me" (Thisby, MND, 5.1); "O my swineherd!" (ODYSSEY).  From the Greek: “to turn away;” pron.: ah-PAW-stroh-fee.   ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY: See...
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  • Literary Terminology
    III. Literary terminology 1. Elements of Style a. Figures of Speech Figures of speech are expressions that stretch words beyond their literal meanings. By connecting or juxtaposing different sounds and thoughts, figures of speech increase the breadth and subtlety of expression. Alliteration: The...
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  • All About Poetry
    COMPOSITION, SOMETIMES RHYMED, EXPRESSING EXPERIENCES, IDEAS, OR EMOTIONS IN A STYLE MORE CONCENTRATED, IMAGINATIVE, AND POWERFUL THAN THAT OF ORDINARY SPEECH OR PROSE: SOME POEMS ARE IN METER, SOME IN FREE VERSE. A poem begins in delight and ends in wisdom. – ROBERT FROST PROSE…words in their best order...
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  • Stylistics
    begin by considering its relationship with its most notable predecessor —rhetoric. The term is derived from the Greek techne rhetorike, the art of speech, an art concerned with the use of public speaking as a means of persuasion. The inhabitants of Homer’s epics exploit and, more significantly, acknowledge...
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  • Critial Vocab, English Lit a Level
    technique of the painting, say the brush strokes, but not the whole. Other paintings require us to stand close to see the whole; their design and any figures become less clear as we move back from the painting. Similarly, fiction, drama, and poetry involve the reader emotionally to different degrees. Emotional...
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  • Metaphor
    What is a metaphor? It is a figure of speech in which a Word or phrase that denotes a certain object or idea is applied to another word or phrase to imply some similarity between them. Similes are comparisons that show how 2 things that are not alike in most ways are a way to describe something....
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  • Classification of Literature
    Biography Autobiography Diary History Chronicle News Anecdote Tragedy Comedy Opera Operetta Ballad Epic Metrical Tale Metrical Romance Ode Sonnet Song Elegy POINT OF COMPARISON | PROSE | POETRY | Form | Paragraph | Verse | Language | Words and rhythms of ordinary and everyday language...
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  • thatcher
    1. G. M. Hopkins, “The Windhover”, “I wake and feel the fell of dark…” 2. William Shakespeare, Sonnets 1-7 3. John Donne, “Valediction Forbidding Mourning”, “The Flea”, “Hymn to God, My God in my Sickness” 4. George Herbert, “The Collar”, “The Altar”, “Love III” 5. Andrew Marvell, “To his Coy Mistress” ...
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  • Literature
    term used to describe the generation of writers, many of them soldiers that came to maturity during World War I. Notable members of this group include F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Dos Passos, and Ernest Hemingway, whose novel The Sun Also Rises embodies the Lost Generation’s sense of disillusionment. Magic...
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  • Poetic Terminology
    words. Using a word like “morose” instead of simply “sad”, or “elated” instead of merely “happy”.] 13. Dramatic monologue- One person performs a speech that defines a certain theatrical moment. [EX: Monologues are common place in plays, musicals, movies TV shows, the whole theatric industry. It is...
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  • Study Guide - English Terminology
    historical and cultural. | COUPLETin a poem, a pair of lines that are the same length and usually rhyme and form a complete thought. Shakespearean sonnets usually end in a couplet. | CULTURAL CONTEXT refers to factors that influence the way of living that is followed by specific groups of people....
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  • Literature Test - Poetry
    dignified, and impersonal. Ex. are not angry b. Informal diction = language that is not as lofty or impersonal as formal diction; similar to everyday speech.  c. Concrete diction = Words that involve material, representable things rather than ideas or immaterial concepts; the opposite of abstract diction...
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  • Epic Feature
    Shakespeare feature many soliloquies. The "To be or not to be" speech in Hamlet is perhaps the most famous one in the English language. Juliet's "O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?" are other famous examples of Shakespearean soliloquies (although Juliet's speech is overheard by Romeo). Ans (B) A simile is...
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  • Critical
    things past” (Shakespeare, “Sonnet 30”). Allusion: reference to a statement, person, place, event, or thing that is known from literature, history, religion, mythology, politics, sports, science, or popular culture. Example: He had the patience of Job. Apostrophe: a figure of speech in which the speaker directly...
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  • John Donne
    the scope of the Elizabethan tradition. He implements already existing modes in every aspect: new metrical schemes (although he will return to the sonnet in his last works), a rich and original imagery, a colloquial, conversational tone, and a mingling of intellect and passion which disconcerted his...
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  • Norse Mythology
    fly and entered through a chink in the roof. Since she was wearing the necklace and it was impossible to remove without disturbing her, Loki became a flea and bit her, causing Freya to shift. Loki then resumed his human form, took the necklace and left. When she awoke she knew Odin had the necklace, so...
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  • The Relationship Between Donne's Religious and Secular Verse.
    It is this sense of Donne's individuality that creates two types of poetry that, for all their differences, are strikingly similar. The holy sonnets refer to the old love poet characteristics of Donne, such as in ‘I am little world' when he remembers ‘the fire of lust', or ...
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  • Genres in Writing
    Tales. E.g. Beka Lamb, Pecos Bill, Sherlock Holmes Poetry and Description is a genre marked by: rhythm, rhyme and precise language Kinds of Poetry: Sonnet, Haiku, Ballad, Free Verse and Prose Poem Exposition as a genre: relies on facts to inform and explain Expository Writing: Analytical Essay, Cause...
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  • The Role of Metaphor in Expressing Emotions
    entitled “ An investigation into the role of metaphor in description of emotions in English poetic disscourse” and focused on William Shakespeares’ sonnets. The choice is based on two reasons. Firstly, recent research states that “Metaphorical modes of expression are characteristic of all adult discourse”...
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  • Oxford Dictionnary
    completeness all the most common terms found in literary discussion, I have set aside several that I have judged to be sufficiently well understood in common speech (anagram, biography, cliche and many more), or virtually self-explanatory (detective story, psychological criticism), along with a broad category of...
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