• Bwap
    , 1.4).  Cf. Shakespeare's description of incessant ocean waves to convey the inevitability of death: "Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end" (Sonnet 60).  Any figures of speech such as SIMILES and METAPHORS to visualize a mood, idea or CHARACTER...
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  • Literary Terminology
    III. Literary terminology 1. Elements of Style a. Figures of Speech Figures of speech are expressions that stretch words beyond their literal meanings. By connecting or juxtaposing different sounds and thoughts, figures of speech increase the breadth and subtlety of expression. Alliteration...
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  • Metaphor
    What is a metaphor? It is a figure of speech in which a Word or phrase that denotes a certain object or idea is applied to another word or phrase to imply some similarity between them. Similes are comparisons that show how 2 things that are not alike in most ways are a way to describe something...
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  • thatcher
    1. G. M. Hopkins, “The Windhover”, “I wake and feel the fell of dark…” 2. William Shakespeare, Sonnets 1-7 3. John Donne, “Valediction Forbidding Mourning”, “The Flea”, “Hymn to God, My God in my Sickness” 4. George Herbert, “The Collar”, “The Altar”, “Love III” 5. Andrew Marvell, “To his Coy...
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  • All About Poetry
    imagery which is produced by figures of speech. These take many forms, but all are rhetorical methods which affect the literal meaning of words. Let’s start by looking at single words which appear synonymous: dumb, stupid, slow, uneducated, ignorant, obtuse, dense smart, clever, shrewd,brilliant...
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  • Stylistics
    . This phrase is prompted as much by the unpredictable immediacy of the speech act (the addresser in stanza 1 cannot predict that the addressee will attempt to squash the flea) as it is by any prepared code for the delivery of the intended message (his request for sex). At the same time, however, the...
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  • Classification of Literature
    dead person, a deity, and abstract quality, or something nonhuman as if it were present and capable of responding. In literary pieces, this figure of speech usually starts with an exclamation 'O'. Examples of apostrophe are: Examples: O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo? - Romeo and Juliet...
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  • Literature
    create an atmosphere of innocence and magic. Elements of Style Figures of Speech Figures of speech are expressions that stretch words beyond their literal meanings. By connecting or juxtaposing different sounds and thoughts, figures of speech increase the breadth and subtlety of...
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  • Poetic Terminology
    . [EX: Walt Whitman’s O Captain! My Captain! “Here Captain! Dear father!/This arm is beneath your head;/It is some dream that on deck,/You’ve fallen cold and dead”] 17. Metaphor- figure of speech that describes something through comparison to something entirely unrelated otherwise. [EX: “feeling...
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  • Donne as a Distinctive Poet
    ” 3. The Sunne Rising 4. The Canonization 5. The Anniversarie 6. A Valediction-Forbidding Mourning 7. A Valediction-Of Weeping 8. The Ecstasy 9. The Flea 10. The Dreame 11. The Relique 12. Holy Sonnet-Thou Hast Made Me … Decay? 13. Holy Sonnet-Death Be Not proud, … Thee 14. Holly Sonnet...
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  • Epic Feature
    in poetic dramas; dramas in prose tend to use a more realistic speaking style and rarely if ever feature them. The plays of William Shakespeare feature many soliloquies. The "To be or not to be" speech in Hamlet is perhaps the most famous one in the English language. Juliet's "O Romeo, Romeo...
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  • Genres in Writing
    for specific purposes. d. Definition essay- draws on a writer’s emotional experience to describe something abstract. e. Oxymoron- A figure of speech in which apparently contradictory terms appear in conjunction (e.g., bitter sweet). f. Onomatopoeia-The formation of a word from a sound...
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  • John Donne
    away from the smoothness of previous poets. Rhythm is secondary; at its best, it merely helps to underline ideas. One is going to examine in the first place those figures of speech that contribute to enhance musicality, not sense; those that could be appreciated on hearing the poem even by a person...
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  • Critical
    figure of speech in which the speaker directly addresses an absent or dead person, an abstract quality, or something nonhuman as if it were present and capable of responding. Example: “And chiefly Thou, O Spirit, that dost prefer / Before all temples th’ upright heart and pure / Instruct me… (Milton...
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  • Literature Test - Poetry
    . (skeleton = death) 5. Understand parallelism in a poem. Parallelism in poetry is a technique that involves the art of rhyming sentences. Program #14 Seeing Anew: Rhetorical Figures in Poetry 1. Define and recognize examples of figures of speech, including metaphor, explicit...
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  • Study Guide - English Terminology
    a particular way to achieve a particular effect. Figures of speech are organised into different categories, such as alliteration, assonance, metaphor, metonymy, onomatopoeia, simile, and synecdoche. | FIRST PERSONA first-person story is told using the ‘I’ or ‘we’ voice – the storyteller may be...
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  • The Relationship Between Donne's Religious and Secular Verse.
    love poetry. The voice used in his secular poetry to address his listener (more often then not a woman), such as in ‘the flea', is the same as the voice used to address his listener in his holy sonnets (frequently God himself). This voice is personalised by...
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  • Literture Analysis Handbook
    . “A penny saved is a penny earned.” apostrophe a figure of speech in which an absent person or thing is addressed directly. An example is: “O Death, where is thy sting?” assonance the repetition of vowel sounds anywhere in the words, e.g. “bright lights.” atmosphere the mood of a literary work...
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  • Oxford Dictionnary
    laws of death.' In philosophy, an antithesis is a second argument or principle brought forward to oppose a first proposition or *THESIS (see dialectic). Adjective: antithetical. antonomasia [an-ton-o-may-zia], a *FIGURE OF SPEECH that replaces a proper name with an *EPITHET (the Bard for Shakespeare...
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  • Critial Vocab, English Lit a Level
    promotion, position, etc, to another instead.   Oxymoron - Oxymoron is a figure of speech in which two terms appear to contradict each other. Some examples have become so familiar that we hardly notice the contradiction, eg deafening silence. The word comes from the Greek: oxus ('sharp') and mōros...
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