• case
    you would have to allow for exceptions in other circumstances, this would cause greater conflict and distress in the long run. Rule Utilitarians would argue that this would lead to a worse society and cause greater pain than if in the one circumstance where Dianne had to suffer. For example you...
    Premium 1223 Words 5 Pages
  • Utilitarianism
    consequences overall: for example, he might think that it would increase distress because ill people would come to feel that they had to ask for euthanasia although they did not want it. On the Utilitarian view a law which does not have the best consequences is not the right law; so the cautious Utilitarian...
    Premium 619 Words 3 Pages
  • Philosohy
    widespread suffering. Nevertheless, a war is justified if it brings about even more happiness for everyone in the long run, as compared to alternative policies. The “cost/benefit analysis” is at the heart of all utilitarian reasoning. For example, when faced with forming a policy on euthanasia, we...
    Premium 995 Words 4 Pages
  • Act Utilitarian
    utilitarian says that people could do that and they would not only make everyone happier but they would also be doing what is morally right. An act utilitarian doesn’t have conflicts over any action being right or wrong. Example of Act Utilitarian A coach of a kid’s basketball has to play each kid...
    Premium 1168 Words 5 Pages
  • Discuss the Distinction Between a Fundamental and a Subordinate Moral Principle Using the Utilitarian Theory as an Example
    Discuss the distinction between a fundamental and a subordinate moral principle using the utilitarian theory as an example. A fundamental moral principle is a moral principle which is the ultimate basis for evaluating the rightness or wrongness of all acts. It is the ultimate and final reason in...
    Premium 1071 Words 5 Pages
  • Utilitarianism
    Utilitarianism. Classical utilitarians believe in Hedonist, were pleasure or happiness is perceives as the only intrinsic good. In modern society most utilitarians believe that the concept of good refers to preferences, and that individual preference satisfaction should be maximized for example artistic...
    Premium 996 Words 4 Pages
  • Utilitarianism Stuart vs Mill
    careful calculation. For example, an act utilitarian deciding from a list of possible day trips would sit down and calculate out the utility of each possible decision before coming to a conclusion as to which one was preferable. Contrary to an act utilitarian, a rule utilitarian uses the principles...
    Premium 994 Words 4 Pages
  • Positive Utiliraianism
    utilitarians claim that the right thing to do is that which produces the best consequences, but they define the best consequences in terms of preference satisfaction. However, one problem with this view is it implies that what you don't know can't hurt you. For example, suppose someone secretly spread...
    Premium 603 Words 3 Pages
  • Ethics
    dropped the second part and talked simply about “the greatest happiness principle (Wikipedia).” One example of utilitarian reasoning from ‘Peter’s Philosophy Page’ states; from the movie “Abandon Ship”, in which the captain of a sunken ship finds himself in the middle of the ocean with only...
    Premium 1560 Words 7 Pages
  • Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment: Raskolnikov's Mathematical Evaluati
    outweigh the pain inflicted upon her. Although Raskolnikov's reasoning seems to be a clear example of the utilitarian principle, in reality it simplifies utilitarianism to the point of distortion. A utilitarian would argue that Raskolnikov has not shown the murder to be morally justifiable...
    Premium 1730 Words 7 Pages
  • Utilitarianism
    aggressors very difficult. Rule utilitarians would then add that there are general exception rules that allow the breaking of other rules if this increases happiness, one example being self-defense. Critics would then argue that this reduces rule utilitarianism to act utilitarianism, and the rules become...
    Premium 5761 Words 24 Pages
  • Utilitarian vs Retributive
    so that he will not commit future crimes. For example, an utilitarian theorist would believe strongly in incarcerating, or incapacitating, or even executing an individual who is likely to commit another crime The practical problem with this belief is that it is hard to identify specific individuals...
    Premium 574 Words 3 Pages
  • Sales Promotion
    on persuasion (Eagly and Chaiken 1993). For example, Edwards (1990) finds that hedonic information on the smell of a beverage is more persuasive than utilitarian information on its storage requirements when the attitude toward the beverage is based on hedonic benefits (taste) than when it is based...
    Premium 13361 Words 54 Pages
  • My Sisters Keeper
    younger to the medical benefit of the elder is not morally justifiable using rule utilitarian ethical theory. This principle is not justifiable due to both the nature of the proposed rule regarding PGD and, primarily, to the nature of utilitarian ethical philosophy in general. Arguments...
    Premium 2290 Words 10 Pages
  • Utilitarianism
    various objections to it. Some of these objections concern “human nature,” and Mill's responses to these objections reveal his psychology. Objection 1 One objection is that utilitarianism is a simple hedonism, that utilitarians are simply pleasure-seekers. For example, consider the case of the...
    Premium 3612 Words 15 Pages
  • John Stewart Mill’s Idea of Utilitarianism – Does It Still Exist Today?
    of utilitarianism? After some careful thinking and tedious research, the answer is of course yes, in contemporary society there still are examples of utilitarianism. An odd example of utilitarian practice existing in society is found in a piece of aboriginal literature. Although it is not quite...
    Premium 1255 Words 6 Pages
  • Emotions by Design: a Consumer Perspective
    . Utilitarian benefits are defined as those pertaining to instrumental and functional benefits that are closer to necessities than luxuries (Batra & Ahtola, 1990; Chitturi et al. 2007; Dhar & Wertenbroch, 2000; Strahilevitz & Myers, 1998). In the context of cell phones, for example, the phone’s battery life...
    Premium 9080 Words 37 Pages
  • Assess Utilitarianism
    Utilitarianism, a form of consequentialism, is a philosophy that advocates mass pleasure for the majority. Although some utilitarian theories seek to maximise pleasurable consequences, (Hedonistic Utilitarianism, Act Utilitarianism), others seek to encourage rules that are seen as “right” (Rule...
    Premium 1432 Words 6 Pages
  • Utilitarianism
    feelings, but with the positive feelings too. This means, for example, that a utilitarian might believe that it is worthwhile to endure a certain amount of suffering now, if it ensures a greater amount of happiness later. In classical utilitarianism, happiness is regarded as positively valuable...
    Premium 400 Words 2 Pages
  • Hard Times
    Utilitarianism "Quadruped. Graminivorous. Forty teeth, namely twenty-four grinders, four eye-teeth, and twelve incisive. Sheds coat in spring......" A perfect example of a product of utilitarian education, Bitzer defines a horse off the top of his head in a split second. Utilitarianism is...
    Premium 1697 Words 7 Pages