"Difference Between Theory X And Theory Y" Essays and Research Papers

  • Difference Between Theory X And Theory Y

    Theory X and Theory Y From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article may require copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone, or spelling. You can assist by editing it. (October 2014) Theory X and Theory Y are theories of human motivation, created and developed by Douglas McGregor at the MIT Sloan School of Management in the 1960s, that have been used in human resource management, organizational behavior, organizational communication and organizational development. They describe two contrasting...

    Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor, Management 1113  Words | 3  Pages

  • Theory X, Theory Y

    Theory X, Theory Y by Douglas McGregor is a motivation theory. Douglas McGregor is a social psychologist and applied two sets of assumptions to the organizational structure called Theory X and Theory Y. His theory is based on managerial views of human beings. In his book, The Human Side of Enterprise, he outlined a new role for managers. He stated that managers should assist subordinates in reaching their full potential, rather than commanding and controlling. Theory X is negative and Theory Y can...

    Behavior, Douglas McGregor, Goal 1381  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory X and Theory Y

    Theory X and Theory Y Douglas McGregor (1906 - 1964) is one of the forefathers of management theory and one of the top business thinkers of all time. He was a social psychologist who became the President of Antioch College. He later became a professor of management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (he was succeeded by Warren Bennis). His book The Human Side of Enterprise (1960) had a profound influence on the management field, largely due to his Theory X and Theory Y. McGregor developed...

    Control, Douglas McGregor, Goal 1209  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory X & Theory Y

    Theory X and Theory Y represent two sets of assumptions about human nature and human behavior that are relevant to the practice of management. Theory X represents a negative view of human nature that assumes individuals generally dislike work, are irresponsible, and require close supervision to do their jobs. Theory Y denotes a positive view of human nature and assumes individuals are generally industrious, creative, and able to assume responsibility and exercise self-control in their jobs. One would...

    Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor, Human behavior 2261  Words | 7  Pages

  • Theory X and Theory Y

    1.0 THEORY X1.1 THEORY X ASSUMPTIONS | 2-3 | 2 | 2.0 THEORY Y2.1 THEORY Y ASSUMPTIONS | 4-5 | 3 | 3.0 BIG FIVE PERSONALITY TRAITS-OPENNESS-EXTRAVERSION-NEUROTICISM-CAREFULNESS-SOCIABILITY | 6-11 | 1.0 THEORY X What is theory X? The “Theory X” management theory holds that the average employee has little ambition, dislikes work and must be coerced, controlled and directed to achieve organizational objectives. Those in management who believe the behavioral assumption of “Theory X” take...

    Big Five personality traits, Management, Neuroticism 1711  Words | 7  Pages

  • Theory X and Theory Y

    Theory X and Theory Y Understanding Team Member Motivation What motivates employees to go to work each morning? Many people get great satisfaction from their work and take great pride in it; Others may view it as a burden, and simply work to survive. This question of motivation has been studied by management theorists and social psychologists for decades, in attempts to identify successful approaches to management. Social psychologist Douglas McGregor of MIT expounded two contrasting theories...

    Control, Douglas McGregor, Knowledge management 915  Words | 3  Pages

  • Gregor's Theory X and Y

    Gregor’s Theory X and Y Before explaining Gregor’s theory X and Y,let me introduce you to motivation. Motivation internal and external factors that stimulate desire and energy in people to be continually interested and committed to a job, role or subject, or to make an effort to attain a goal. In other words motivation is the process by which a person’s effort are energized,directed and sustained toward attaining a goal. In an organization, managers need to be ale able to motivate employees...

    Abraham Maslow, Human behavior, Management 719  Words | 3  Pages

  • Economic Theory X and Theory Y

    Theory X and Theory Y In his 1960 book, The Human Side of Enterprise, Douglas McGregor proposed two theories by which to view employee motivation. He avoided descriptive labels and simply called the theories Theory X and Theory Y. Both of these theories begin with the premise that management's role is to assemble the factors of production, including people, for the economic benefit of the firm. Beyond this point, the two theories of management diverge. Theory X Theory X assumes that the average...

    Abraham Maslow, Decision making, Douglas McGregor 824  Words | 3  Pages

  • Mcgregor's X and Y Theory

    last couple of centuries and there have been a number of different theories into the best way it can be done. This essay will give some background knowledge into those theories but will primarily focus on McGregor’s development of his Theory X and Theory Y, incorporating how they evolved, what they are and how relevant they are to managers of the 21st century. The aim of this piece is to gain a better understanding of the theories of management developed by McGregor and how/if they are still being...

    Douglas McGregor, Management, Mary Parker Follett 1322  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory X, Y, and Z

    Comparison and Contrast on Theory XY and Z Douglas McGregor suggested that there are two different ways in which we can look at workers attitudes toward work. Each of these views, which McGregor called Theory X and Theory Y, has implications for management. Theory X ('authoritarian management' style) -People do not really like to work and will avoid it if at all possible so they must be coerced, controlled, directed, threatened with punishment to get them to work. -The average worker avoids...

    Decision making, Decision making software, Decision theory 911  Words | 3  Pages

  • The relationship of theory X and theory Y

    Assignment for International Business Critically evaluate McGregor's Theory X and Theory Y. How far is it applicable to management and employee motivation in contemporary Chinese organizations? Student Name: Xin Guo ID 6511517 Module code: X10FCD I give permission for this paper to be used for future research and training purposes. Yes Critically evaluate McGregor's Theory X and Theory Y. How far is it applicable to management and employee motivation in contemporary...

    Assumption of Mary, China, Chinese people 1369  Words | 5  Pages

  • Mcgregors Theories X and Y

    Compare McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y style of leadership and consider the types of organizations in which each style of leadership might be most appropriate. Douglas McGregor devised his concept of Theory X and Theory Y in the USA in the 1950’s using a survey of managers, which he then proposed in his book, ‘The Human Side of Enterprise’ in the 1960’s. Theory X states that a manager distrusts his subordinates, believes they don’t enjoy work and therefore must be controlled. Theory Y, on the other...

    Abraham Maslow, Decision making, Decision theory 871  Words | 3  Pages

  • Theory X and Y

    douglas mcgregor - theory x y Douglas McGregor's XY Theory, managing an X Theory boss, and William Ouchi's Theory Z Douglas McGregor, an American social psychologist, proposed his famous X-Y theory in his 1960 book 'The Human Side Of Enterprise'. Theory x and theory y are still referred to commonly in the field of management and motivation, and whilst more recent studies have questioned the rigidity of the model, Mcgregor's X-Y Theory remains a valid basic principle from which to develop positive...

    Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor, Management 1396  Words | 5  Pages

  • Mc Gregors Theory X and Y

    The foundation of McGregor’s theory has direct links to Taylor’s study of scientific management: a study of scientific management as a link between human beings and their jobs which in turn need to be re-constructed to maximise efficiency (Waddell et al. 2007, p. 43). Many researchers and scholars have developed theories based on the work of F.W. Taylor. McGregor, Maslow and others who assisted to improve the view of human relation tried to prove that there is another side to the traditional perspective...

    21st century, Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor 1672  Words | 5  Pages

  • Douglas Mcgregor - Theory X & Y

    DOUGLAS MCGREGOR FLOW • PROFILE • WHY NOW ? .. • WORKS INTRO HIS STUDY • THEORY-X THEORY-Y CONCLUSION • RELEVANCE • APPLICATIONS PROFILE-DOUGLAS MC GREGOR (1906-1964) He graduated Wayne State University PHD in Experimental Psychology(Harvard) He was Born Published his Theory of X & Y in the book “Human Side of Enterprise” Death 1906 1932 1935 1960 1964 HIS WORKS • Douglas Mc Gregor is one of the forefathers of contemporary management thinking over...

    Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor, Human 590  Words | 4  Pages

  • Difference Between Law and Theory

    | |Research Methodology | |Difference between Theory and Law | | | Difference between the Law and the Theory Law  1) An empirical generalization; a statement of a biological principle that appears to be without exception at the time it is made, and...

    Explanation, Hypothesis, Observation 1002  Words | 4  Pages

  • Assumption of Douglas Mc Gregor Theory X and Theory Y

    "The Human Side of Enterprise" and the 1960 book of the same name, in which he introduced what came to be called the new humanism. McGregor argued that the conventional approach to managing was based on three major propositions, which he called Theory X: 1. Management is responsible for organizing the elements of productive enterprise-money, materials, equipment, and people-in the interests of economic ends. 2. With respect to people, this is a process of directing their efforts, motivating...

    Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor, Management 1215  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory Z

    Theory Z: The In-Between and Grey Area Name Here Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne 3/24/2013 Abstract The purpose of this paper is to discuss the popular Theory X and Theory Y made famous by Douglas McGregor in the 1960’s which offers a very “hard” and “soft” view of leadership and addresses the grey area that is not addressed in his theory. We will take a look at the theory that is relatively new and in many respects attempts to blend the best of both of McGregor’s theories...

    A Great Way to Care, Douglas McGregor, Leader 2477  Words | 7  Pages

  • Critically evaluate McGregor's Theory X and Theory Y. How far is it applicable to management and employee motivation in contemporary Chinese organizations?

    Critically evaluate McGregor's Theory X and Theory Y. How far is it applicable to management and employee motivation in contemporary Chinese organizations? During the 1960s the number of psychologists invented motivational theories, which aimed to increase organizations’ productivity. One of those is McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y, in which he claimed that people can be managed in two extremes, based on the grounds of their needs. After publishing his work had a significant impact on management...

    Abraham Maslow, China, Douglas McGregor 1190  Words | 4  Pages

  • Critically evaluate McGregor's Theroy X and Theory Y

    Critically evaluate McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y. How far is it applicable to management and employee motivation in contemporary Chinese organizations? In the modern corporation environment, employees’ motivation plays a pivotal role, thus they should be recognised as a significant part of corporations’ financial assets. There are several distinct viewpoints of approaches to managerial strategies about motivating employees, one of which is McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y. It proposes that providing...

    Abraham Maslow, Control, Douglas McGregor 1328  Words | 5  Pages

  • Motivational Theories

    Compare and contrast two theories of motivation. Suggest how a team leader might use these theories to motivate their team. Over the years, many psychologists have developed various theories of motivation based on what they believe motivates people and why different people react and behave differently in a range of situations. Motivation is the “extent to which an individual is engaged by the work role he or she occupies.” It is very important that in today’s society, managers have a successful...

    Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor, Human behavior 1988  Words | 5  Pages

  • What Is the Difference Between Myth and Theory?

    the difference between myths and theories? Well that’s an easy question to answer isn’t it; myths involve fiction while theories involve facts, we should not make any parallels between science and superstition. There, we’ve answered the question, or have we? Although many people will agree that myth and theory are two totally different things, I would debate that the line between the two is much thinner than one would think. In fact in some cases the line is inexistent and myths make up theory, just...

    Creation myth, Earth, Evidence 1326  Words | 3  Pages

  • Pplication of Two Motivation Theories-Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Theory and Mcgregor’s Theory X &Y to Increase the Productivity of Staff

    desire and perceptions can be defined as the present and expected impression of workers’ place in the company.(Dixon,1997,p.72) In order to motivate my workers, I must know their needs and perceptions. I would choose Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory and Theory X&Y to understand their needs, then to motivate them to perform at his or her highest level. According to Maslow, a person’s needs are the main motivator that drives a human. He categorized the needs of a person into 5 levels. They are physiological...

    Abraham Maslow, Fundamental human needs, Happiness 1416  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory X and Theory Y

    Theory X and Theory Y After World War II there were several studies performed that ultimately revealed how assumptions about workers’ attitudes and behaviors affect managers’ behavior. In the 1960s one of the most influential approaches was created and developed by Douglas McGregor at the MIT Sloan School Of Management. He proposed two sets of assumptions about how work attitudes and behaviors not only dominate the way mangers think but also affect how they behave in organizations. He named these...

    Douglas McGregor, Ford Motor Company, Hewlett-Packard 621  Words | 2  Pages

  • Nursing Administration Theory X, Y and Z

    THEORY X, Y AND Z IN NURSING ADMINISTRATION According to Mc Gregor, the traditional manager in a bureaucracy operates on a set of assumptions about human nature and human behaviour, which was called as Theory X. Accordingly, his assumptions are the following: (1) the average human being has an inherent dislike of work and will avoid it, if he can, when possible; (2) Because of dislike of a work, most people must be coaxed, controlled, directed, threatened with punishment to get through...

    Employment, Human, Human behavior 988  Words | 3  Pages

  • The X Theory and Y Theory

    The X Theory and Y Theory Douglas McGregor, a social psychologist, introduced us to his famous X-Y Theory in his 1960 book The Human Side of Enterprise. Theory X and Theory Y are most commonly referred to in the field of management and employee motivation. McGregor's theories, although over 40 years old, remain a basic principle from which to develop positive management. Both the X and the Y theories begin with the premise that management's role is to assemble the factors of production. Theory X...

    Decision making, Decision theory, Douglas McGregor 391  Words | 2  Pages

  • The Difference Between Convergence and Divergence Theories

    1960) throughout the globe. While convergence supporters may provide a somewhat utopian view, the principles behind convergence are idealistic in their view. This concept is streamlined while allowing for the transfer of human capital with little differences of awards, unionism and other factors. While this concept may provide the globe with a safety net, factors that may work against convergence are political, social, cultural and ideological as well as different IR systems that are in play globally...

    Capitalism, Collective bargaining, Employment 1139  Words | 4  Pages

  • evolution of management theories

    2–4Weber’s Bureaucracy Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 2–2 Theory X and Y • Douglas McGregor proposed the two different sets of worker assumptions.  Theory X: Assumes the average worker is lazy, dislikes work and will do as little as possible. • Managers must closely supervise and control through reward and punishment.  Theory Y: Assumes workers are not lazy, want to do a good job and the job itself will determine if the worker...

    Douglas McGregor, Management, Open system 368  Words | 9  Pages

  • Motivational Theories

    McGregor’s Theory X and Y Theory X and Theory Y are theories of human motivation created and developed by Douglas McGregor at the MIT Sloan School of Management in the 1960’s. Theory X and Theory Y have to do with the perceptions managers hold on their employees, not the way they generally behave. It is attitude not attributes. Theory X • Manager’s/ Management’s assumptions – • Management assumes employees is inherently lazy, will avoid work and they inherently dislike work. • Due to this management...

    Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor, Employment 697  Words | 7  Pages

  • Mcgregor Theory X

    psychologist formulated a theory that has changed the path of management thinking and practice. He proposed two sets of assumptions about employee's attitude and behaviour, so the manager will be in a better position to manage the workers and achieve organizational goals. McGregor named these assumptions as Theory X and Theory This essay would examine the pros and cons of this theory of employee motivation, followed by writer's opinion. (McGregor, 1960) Theory X: According to Theory X, Managers assume...

    Control, Douglas McGregor, Ford Motor Company 1081  Words | 3  Pages

  • Theory

    perspective 1. Behaviorism: Pavlov, Thorndike, Skinner 2. Neo-Behaviorism: Tolmann and Bandura B. Cognitive Perspective 1. Gestalt Psychology 2. Bruner’s constructivist Theory 3. Bruner’s constructivist theory 4. Ausebel’s Meaningful Verbal Learning / Subsumption Theory Prepared by: Nemarose Jane Tauyan Behaviorism: Pavlov, Thorndike, Skinner Pavlov (1849 - 1936) For most people, the name "Pavlov" rings a bell (pun intended). The Russian physiologist is...

    Behaviorism, Classical conditioning, Extinction 776  Words | 4  Pages

  • Learning Insights on Theory X, Y, Z and Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

    Organizational Theory Professor Elmer P. Nacua July 20, 2013 LEARNING INSIGHTS ON THEORY X / Y / Z AND MASLOW’S HEIRARCHY OF NEEDS McGregor’s Theory X / Y and William Ouichi’s Theory Z I can say that Theory X presents the pessimistic view of employees’ nature and behaviour at work, while Theory Y presents the optimistic view. With reference to Maslow’s theory, Theory X is based on the assumption that the employees emphasize on the physiological needs and the safety needs; while Theory Y is based on...

    Abraham Maslow, Fundamental human needs, Management 786  Words | 3  Pages

  • Chaos Theory

    illustrate patterns in nature but there were many aspects of Mother Nature that remained a mystery to Physicists and Mathematicians alike. Mathematics is an integral part of physics. It provides an order and a guide to thinking; it shows the relationship between many physical phenomenons. The error in mathematics until that point was linearity. "Clouds are not spheres, mountains are not cones, bark is not smooth, nor does lightning travel in a straight line." - Benoit Mandlebrot. Was it not beyond reason...

    Benoît Mandelbrot, Butterfly effect, Chaos theory 2006  Words | 6  Pages

  • Differences Between American and Japanese Management Systems

    results of studies have highlighted critical differences in management and culture; these factors are most critical in explaining the stellar performance of Japanese companies. The differences between the two systems of management are as clear as east versus west. Theorists like William Ouchi (Theory Z) and Peters and Waterman (Excellence theory) actually developed contemporary management theories based on these perceived differences. These theories helped American companies learn and apply...

    Business process reengineering, Douglas McGregor, Management 592  Words | 3  Pages

  • Managerial Grid Theory

    Managerial Grid Theory The managerial grid model (1964) is a behavioral leadership model developed by Robert R. Blake and Jane Mouton. This model originally identified five different leadership styles based on the concern for people and the concern for production. The optimal leadership style in this model is based on Theory Y. The model is represented as a grid with concern for production as the x-axis and concern for people as the y-axis The indifferent (previously called impoverished) style...

    Douglas McGregor, Goal, Leadership 1210  Words | 4  Pages

  • management theories

    Classical Management theory and Human Relations theory have played an vital role in the history of modern management .It is two qualitative leap of modern management system. As two relatively complete system of Management theory, Classical Management theory and Human Relations theory has made its own unique contribution. This essay aims to identify key similarities and differences between two theory by comparing detailed aspects which including focus, the comprehension of structure ,basic assumptions...

    Abraham Maslow, Leadership, Management 1159  Words | 4  Pages

  • Critically Evaluate Mcgregor’s Theory X and Theory Y. How Far Is It Applicable to Management and Employee Motivation in Contemporary Chinese Organizations?

    associated with employee motivation (Geren, 2011). Therefore, applying appropriate motivation theories is attaching much attention in China than before. As a prime example of Western motivation theories, McGregor states that every management method is based on an assumption of human nature and behavior at work in theory X and Y (McGregor, 2000). Whereas theory X emphasizes on strategies of control, theory Y focus motivators more on individual goals. In spite of numerous criticisms that query the certainty...

    Confucianism, Educational psychology, Human behavior 1090  Words | 3  Pages

  • Theory

    Jean Piaget Cognitive Development Theory Biography: Jean Piaget was born in Neuchatel, Switzerland on August 9, 1986 to Arthur Piaget and Rebecca Jackson. At a young age, he displayed great fascination for Biology, his intellectual love. Jean Piaget, at the age of 10 published his first article, which described the albino sparrow he observed. Between the ages of 15 and 18, he published several more articles and most of them are mollusks. Jean Piaget was especially...

    Child development, Developmental psychology, Jean Piaget 1944  Words | 6  Pages

  • Theory

    concepts (Faeth 2004). The exercise of power is legitimated through authority (Weber 1947) and Weber was the first to develop a systematic version of these terms as keystone of his social theory. Lewin (1941) developed the study of leadership by introducing the concept of social power in terms of the differential between interpersonal force and resistance. French and Raven described five sources of power namely reward power, coercive power, legitimate power, referent power and expert power (Raven & French...

    Authority, Max Weber, Organization 1497  Words | 5  Pages

  • Theory Y and X

    distinguishes between two types of scientific theories, theory X and theory Y. He relates these two theories on two managers (Dave and Val) who are in the same organization (Telecommunication company), however in different departments. He continues to talk about how they use their management skills on their employees based on theory X and theory Y. Douglas McGregor, an American Social Psychologist, proposed X-Y theory in his 1960 book “The human side of enterprise”. Theories X and Y are still referred...

    Douglas McGregor, Leadership, Management 472  Words | 2  Pages

  • Heckscher-Ohlin Theory

    Introduction To Heckscher Ohlin's H-O Theory ↓ The Modern Theory of international trade has been advocated by Bertil Ohlin. Ohlin has drawn his ideas from Heckscher's General Equilibrium Analysis. Hence it is also known as Heckscher Ohlin (HO) Model / Theorem / Theory. [pic] According to Bertil Ohlin, trade arises due to the differences in the relative prices of different goods in different countries. The difference in commodity price is due to the difference in factor prices (i.e. costs). Factor...

    Austrian School, Capital, Economics 1330  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theories

    Motivation theories can be classified broadly into two different perspectives: Content and Process theories. Content Theories deal with “what” motivates people and it is concerned with individual needs and goals. Maslow, Alderfer, Herzberg and McCelland studied motivation from a “content” perspective. Process Theories deal with the “process” of motivation and is concerned with “how” motivation occurs. Vroom, Porter & Lawler, Adams and Locke studied motivation from a “process” perspective. 1. Content...

    Abraham Maslow, Expectancy theory, Fundamental human needs 1835  Words | 7  Pages

  • the theory

    Title of the article: The Realization of Gardner's Multiple Intelligences (MI) Theory in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) Name of the journal: _____________________________________________________ Journal Number and Issue Number: Issue 6, 90355924 Article pages: p1233-1241 DOI number (if available): 10.4304/jltr.3.6.1233-1241 (1) What is the article about? This article explains the relationship between multiple intelligence and second-language learning. The detection of how the two...

    Education theory, Emotional intelligence, Howard Gardner 466  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Theory of Motivation

    Money is the most important factor motivating workers today. Discuss this statement with reference to motivational theories you are aware of. The word motivation according to Richard Romando is gotten from the Latin phrase "movere", which means to move. Motivation is defined as an inner drive that activates performance and gives it direction. The term motivation theory is concerned with the process that explains why and how human behaviour is stimulated and directed. It is considered as one of the...

    Abraham Maslow, Educational psychology, Fundamental human needs 1971  Words | 5  Pages

  • Mcgregor's Xy Theory

    Date: 27 April 2012 McGregor’s XY Theory In 1960, American social psychiatrist, Douglas McGregor wrote a book titled ‘The Human Side Of Enterprise’. It was in this book that McGregor first proposed his famous XY theory. McGregor’s XY Theory is a type of motivational management. McGregor’s theory is incredibly simple yet effective. Most of the fundamental elements of the XY Theory rely solely on how the manager views their employees. Even though McGregor’s theory is over fifty years old, it is still...

    Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor, Laborer 1998  Words | 6  Pages

  • Leadership Theories

    management theories have had a major influence on modern theories of leadership. Making effective use of appropriate models and theories critically examine whether this is the case. In order to answer this question, it will be appropriate to look at how classical and humanist theories emerged and outline some of their theories relating to management. Further discussion will be on the role of management in comparison to that of leadership with concluding arguments on how far these theories have influenced...

    Business, Henri Fayol, Leadership 1879  Words | 7  Pages

  • Describe The Differences Between The Universal And The Contingency Leadership Theories

    9. Describe the differences between the universal and the contingency leadership theories. Explain your answer in sufficient detail to demonstrate your understanding. Be specific using the materials in your text and not a generalized or philosophical statement. Hint: both the trait and behavioral leadership theories were attempts to find the “one best leadership style in all situations”; thus they are called universal leader theories. According to Stogdill and Mann, it was illustrated that traits...

    Business Decision Mapping, Cognition, Decision engineering 2049  Words | 5  Pages

  • Differences and Similiarities Between Agency Theory and Transaction Cost Theory

    relationships are administrated by implicit or explicit contracts between agents and principals. The assumption of agents’ self – interest which contradicts with the principals’ interest is the basis of the agency problem. According to Alawattage and Wickramasinghe, agency theory suggests two fundamental reasons for the agency problem. First is the goal contradiction between the agent and principal. Second reason is the information asymmetry between the agent and principal.  Principal does not know the amount...

    Contract, Contractual term, Cost 1229  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory

    COLLABORATIVE HEALTH TEAM THEORY INTRODUCTION The Collaborative Health Team Theory emphasizes multi-relationship of health care professionals to attain better patient outcomes. This theory is focused on the creation of shared and mutual experience among heath care professionals and patient through interpersonal process to attain desired mutual goals and objectives. Emphasis of this theory is expansion and growth of Hildegard Peplau’s Interpersonal Theory through integrating new roles and functions...

    Allied health professions, Health, Health care 1439  Words | 4  Pages

  • Motivation Theories

    Taylor’s theory of Scientific Management states that employees are motivated by wages.(www.tutor2u.net) Taylor saw money as a main motivation of work. He thought that employer should pay to employee that amount of money should be linked to the amount that employee has produced. Taylor’s idea is simple- let employees work and managers to manage bаsed оn scientific principles of work. Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs consists of 2 parts: Classification of human needs and Relationship between classes...

    Abraham Maslow, Employment, Fundamental human needs 1160  Words | 3  Pages

  • Classical Management Theory and Human Relations Theory

    from the end of the nineteenth century with the emergence of large industrial organizations. Management theories consist of two group—classical management theory and human relations theory. In this essay, the nature of the “Classical” and “Human Relations” approaches to management will be described at first and then bring out the differences and similarities between them. The classical theory of management was formed in the early 20th century and based on a pyramid, formal structure. To be more...

    20th century, Management, Organization 1112  Words | 4  Pages

  • Compare and Contrast of Motivational Theories

    Theories of Motivation Ask any person who is successful in whatever he or she is doing what motivates him/her, and very likely the answer will be "goals". Goal Setting is extremely important to motivation and success. So what motivates you? Why are you in college? If you are in college because that's what your parents want, you may find it difficult to motivate yourself. Sure, it's possible to succeed with someone else providing the motivation for you. ("If you graduate from college, I'll give you...

    Abraham Maslow, Employment, Hygiene factors 688  Words | 3  Pages

  • Compare and Contrast the Management Theories of Frederick Taylor, Henri Fayol, Elton Mayo and Douglas Mcgregor. in What Sense(S) Are These Theories Similar and/or Compatible? in What Sense(S) Are These Theories Dissimilar and/or Compatible? How Wo...

    and Henri Fayol generating management theories such as Taylor’ Scientific Management and Fayol’s Administrative Management. In the late 1920’s and early 1930’s the Hawthorne studies were conducted where Elton Mayo was the predominate figure and contributed to the Behavioural viewpoint. This brought about a Human Relations Movement which included Douglas McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y approach. Similarities and differences can be found between the theories due to the relevant time period they were...

    Douglas McGregor, Hawthorne effect, Management 1911  Words | 6  Pages

  • Theory

    role in adult personality. If a child does not successfully complete a stage, Freud suggested that he or she would develop a fixation that would later influence adult personality and behavior. Erik Erikson also proposed a stage theory of development, but his theory encompassed human growth throughout the entire lifespan. Erikson believed that each stage of development was focused on overcoming a conflict. For example, the primary conflict during the adolescent period involves establishing a sense...

    Albert Bandura, Behavior, Childhood 657  Words | 3  Pages

  • Psychodynamic Theory

    Psychodynamic Theory The psychodynamic theorist such as Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung suggest that psychological, emotional, and motivational forces occur in an unconscious level. Given the diverse cultural backgrounds that exist it is pivotal that professionals in the field develop an understanding of the ethnocentric limitations of the psychodynamic theory. Understanding the psychodynamic theory and multicultural elements coincide, but given the ethnocentric limitations discussed in this paper...

    Carl Jung, Culture, Psychoanalysis 1269  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theories

    Theorist | Theory (with explanation) | Example | Strength | Weakness | Adam Smith | The Wealth of Nations: Theories of efficiency of free trade and market exchanges unrestricted by government that leads to macroeconomic full employment and microeconomic efficiency. | | Free markets allow competition, there is more choice, consumer sovereignty, full employment, higher GDP, efficiency, and economic growth overall.Smith's relevant attention to definite institutional arrangements and process as...

    Demography, Economics, Keynesian economics 2054  Words | 6  Pages

  • Comparison and Contrast on Theory XY and Z

    Comparison and Contrast on Theory XY and Z Douglas McGregor suggested that there are two different ways in which we can look at workers attitudes toward work. Each of these views, which McGregor called Theory X and Theory Y, has implications for management. Theory X ('authoritarian management' style) -People do not really like to work and will avoid it if at all possible so they must be coerced, controlled, directed, threatened with punishment to get them to work. -The average worker avoids responsibility...

    Decision making, Decision making software, Decision theory 873  Words | 4  Pages

  • Consumer Theory

    condition and consumer equilibrium under both cardinal and ordinal utility theory are identical. They both assume that the consumer is rational. Consumer equilibrium, under cardinal utility theory, is achieved when the sufficient condition is met. That is, the total expenditure is equal to the consumer's income. If a consumer is assumed to consumes two commodities only X and Y, then: Utility is a function of Y and X; U = f(X,Y)…………………………..i Let the price of the two commodities be Px and Py respectively ...

    Cardinal utility, Consumer theory, Economics 383  Words | 3  Pages

  • Motivational Theories

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