• Week 2 - Discussion 2
    Inductive Argument Construct an inductive argument for a specific conclusion. Then, explain what you might do to make this inductive argument stronger, either by revising the premises or by revising the conclusion. Inductive reasoning moves from a specific premise to a broad conclusion...
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  • Construct a Deductive Argument That Is Valid but Not
    to pistachios. Construct an inductive argument for a specific conclusion. Then, explain what you might do to make this inductive argument stronger, either by revising the premises or by revising the conclusion. Your initial post should be at least 150 words in length. Respond to at least...
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  • Deductive and Inductive Language
    specific conclusion. Then, explain what you might do to make this inductive argument stronger, either by revising the premises or by revising the conclusion. Week 1 Discussion 1 Consider an argument you have recently had with a friend, family member, manager, co-worker, or someone else...
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  • Reconstructio of Arguments
    fill in missing conclusions unless the context clearly indicates that they may be drawn. When you do fill in missing conclusions, make sure that they do not go beyond what is warranted by the stated premises. In general, this first set of rules for reconstruction admonishes you to put yourself...
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  • Crt 205
    argument as an argument that moves from a general premise to a specific conclusion about a particular thing. Judge Veals’s argument as presented above certainly does this, but that’s not what makes it deductive. What makes it deductive is that the premises are supposed to demonstrate or prove the conclusion...
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  • Critical Thinking
    general premise to a more specific conclusion: Most critical thinking students improve greatly in their ability to analyze arguments. So, you will probably improve greatly in your ability to analyze arguments. This is an inductive argument that has a single premise dealing with a general group...
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  • American Disease Paper
    inference. This section discusses how an inference is what allows a person to make a conclusion based on observations. It reminds students, too, that because inductive conclusions are based on a person’s ability to infer, they are never certain (as deductive arguments are), only probable. Students...
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  • Tajuk
    they do this is that users in this sense, they could be designated ‘users’ to distinguish them from actual users, are constructs who act in accordance with what Finance Theory says they must do. ‘Users’ are those who make decisions about buying/selling etc. using information about future net cash...
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  • Scientific Method
    understand this because you are American (or Chinese, etc.)". The national origin of a person (the premise) has nothing to do with the conclusion that a person can understand something or not, therefore the argument is flawed. Appeals to ridicule are of the form: "You would be stupid to believe that the...
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  • Domestic Violence
    , it is best to interpret the second argument as inductive. Occasionally, an argument contains no special indicator words, and the conclusion does not follow either necessarily or probably from the premises; in other words, it does not follow at all. This situation points up the need for the third...
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  • The Law and Society: Argumentation and Persuasion Notes
    any of the patterns of development. * Narrate * Examples * Contrast * Describe Lavette * Argumentation and Persuasion * College: * In an Economics class, you may be asked to do more than just explain the reasons of import and export between countries. * You might...
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  • Essays
    Recognizing Arguments In this assignment, you will apply key concepts covered in the module readings. You will identify the component parts of arguments and differentiate between various types of arguments such as strict, loose, inductive, and deductive. You will then construct specific...
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  • the philosophy of science
    must be invalid. (Make sure you understand why this argument has the same form as the one immediately preceding it, and why both are invalid. It is important that validity has nothing to do with whether the premises or conclusion are actually true or false; it is a matter of how the premises and...
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  • Critical Thinking and Success Skills
    the specific (particular facts or instances) to the general (principles, theories, rules). It uses two premises that support the probable truth of the conclusion. Thus, an inductive argument looks like this: If A is true and B is true, then C is probably true. How can you determine or measure what is...
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  • Siddharth
    indicators. In many cases, however, arguments do not contain any indicator words at all. In that case, ask the question: what is the speaker trying to get me to believe? This will give the conclusion, and then it should be relatively easy to locate the premises. Sometimes a premise of an argument isn’t...
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  • Critical Thinking
    conclusions that do not follow the premises. To be able to detect a deductive argument, and then determine whether or not it is valid, you must be able to figure out what the premises and the conclusion are. Let’s look more closely at both of these parts that make up a deductive argument. 92...
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  • Thinking
    Unlike deductive arguments, inductive reasoning allows for the possibility that the conclusion is false, even if all of the premises are true. Instead of being valid or invalid, inductive arguments are either strong or weak, which describes how probable it is that the conclusion is true. A classical...
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  • Less Than a Hundred
    ] A good argument has two features: the premises must be true, and they must provide adequate support for the conclusion. It is this latter feature which is the subject matter of logic. There are two standards by which the support given to the conclusion by the premises might be evaluated. Firstly...
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  • Argumentation
    . What is his major premise? His minor premise? His conclusion? 4. What ethical appeal do you notice in the essay? 5. Who do you think is more convincing—Dershowitz or Silverglate? (The question does not ask who you agree with; it asks who makes the more convincing argument.) Explain your view. For...
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  • The Problem of Evil
    well make the world a worse place. It seems possible, then, that there might be evils that are logically necessary for goods that outweigh them, and this possibility provides a reason, accordingly, for questioning one of the premises in the argument set out earlier - namely, premise (4), where it...
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