• Construct a Deductive Argument That Is Valid but Not
    Construct a deductive argument that is valid but not sound. Then, construct a valid deductive argument that is sound. Be sure to put the argument in premise-conclusion form. Your initial post should be at least 150 words in length. Respond to at least two of your classmates’ posts by Day 7. When...
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  • Deductive and Inductive Language
    2 Discussion 1 Deductive Language   Construct a deductive argument that is valid but not sound. Then, construct a valid deductive argument that is sound. Be sure to put the argument in premise-conclusion form.   Discussion 2 Inductive Language   Construct an inductive argument for a specific...
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  • Crt 205
    The Anatomy and Varieties of Arguments Text © The McGraw−Hill Companies, 2007 Chapter The Anatomy and Varieties of Arguments 7 When we evaluate a person’s deeds, including those of a public official like Hillary Clinton here, we ordinarily use deductive arguments. When we surmise what an individual’s...
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  • book review
    something like the following problems: -Some statements are neither true nor false. (a) True (b) False Answer: (b) - A valid argument can be a cogent argument. (a) True (b) False Answer: (b) (2) Be able to identify statements and distinguish them from other sentences. For example...
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  • Logic
    ................................................................................. 2 Inferences And Arguments ................................................................................ 2 Deductive Logic Versus Inductive Logic .......................................................... 5 Statements...
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  • Domestic Violence
    Cengage Learning ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this work covered by the copyright herein may be reproduced, transmitted, stored, or used in any form or by any means graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including but not limited to photocopying, recording, scanning, digitizing, taping, Web distribution...
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  • Siddharth
    introduces the concepts of basic critical reasoning, and proceeds to demonstrate how to work out Facts, Inferences, Judgments, Upstream and Downstream Arguments. The basis of this section is the possibility that CAT or the other entrance examinations may introduce critical reasoning sooner or later, especially...
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  • Deductive Reasonig
    Deductive reasoning Deductive reasoning happens when a researcher works from the more general information to the more specific. Sometimes this is called the “top-down” approach because the researcher starts at the top with a very broad spectrum of information and they work their way down to a specific...
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  • Intelligence a Closer View
    in practical settings.[1] intelligence derives from the Latin verb intelligere which derives from inter-legere meaning to "pick out" or discern. A form of this verb, intellectus, became the medieval technical term for understanding, and a translation for the Greek philosophical term nous. This term...
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  • Thinking
    MOTIVATION 11 7. REASONING 12 7.1 DEDUCTIVE REASONING 12 7.1.1 DEDUCTIVE LOGIC: VALIDITY AND SOUNDNESS 13 7.1.2 HUME’S SKEPTICISM 14 7.1.3 DEDUCTIVE REASONING AND EDUCATION 14 7.2 INDUCTIVE REASONING 15 7.2.1 DESCRIPTION 15 7.2.2 INDUCTIVE VS DEDUCTIVE REASONING 15 7.2.3 DECISION MAKING...
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  • types of travel intermediaries
    for b. DEDUCTIVE REASONING Deductive reasoning, also called deductive logic, is reasoning which constructs or evaluates deductive arguments. Deductive arguments are attempts to show that a conclusion necessarily follows from a set of premises. A deductive argument is valid if the conclusion does follow...
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  • Philosophy Midterm Study Guide
    Inductive argument- start with a particular premise(s), then move to a universal (general) conclusion. Probability. Example: Premise 1: All humans are mortal. Premise 2: Socrates is mortal. Conclusion: Socrates is human. INVALID- Socrates could be a rat. The conclusion follows the premises by a certain...
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  • Writing from Sources Notes
    depends on the evidence and reasoning. a) Evidence refers to any kind of concrete information that can support a thesis. Evidence can take several forms: i) Facts and statistics, especially in social science. ii) Surveys (1) Depend on generalizing from a representative...
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  • Reconstructio of Arguments
    RECONSTRUCTING ARGUMENTS Deductive and Inductive Here we are to learn the techniques for PART I, Making a Critique- i.e., argument reconstruction, by doing the following “steps”: 1. Read the discourse; 2. Number and Bracket arguments; 3. Write an Index of Claims; and 4. Tree-Diagram...
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  • Tajuk
    reasoning, is explained. This reasoning is illustrated by identifying the statement of objective in a CF as the expression of desires that constitute premises in such reasoning. The role of other statements in the CF is considered. In particular, their role in deriving other desires is noted. A similar examination...
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  • Inductive and Deductive Arguements
    Deductive and Inductive Arguments What’s the Difference? Arguments can be separated into two categories: deductive and inductive. A deductive argument is one in which it is impossible for the premises to be true but the conclusion false. Thus, the conclusion follows necessarily from the premises...
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  • Critical Thinking
    Americas, New York, NY 10020. Copyright © 2011, 2008, 2005, 2002. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written consent of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., including, but not...
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  • Chapter 4 Mistakes in Reasoning: the World of Fallacies
    how to construct arguments and how to evaluate them. We’ve seen that arguments are constructed from sentences, with some sentences providing reasons, or premises, for another sentence, the conclusion. The purpose of arguments is to provide support for a conclusion. In a valid deductive argument, we must...
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  • Philosophy
    of their main tools for defending or evaluating arguments in favor or against different ways of conceiving these ideas. Thus your capacity to understand philosophy will hang to a large measure on your ability to identify and understand those arguments. The following notes explain some basic concepts...
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  • Human Behavior in Organization
     Philosophy is distinguished from other ways of addressing such problems by its critical, generally systematic approach and its reliance on rational argument. In more casual speech, by extension, "philosophy" can refer to "the most basic beliefs, concepts, and attitudes of an individual or group". The...
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