• Ethics
    standing) in which it is argued that moral and/or ethical values are not universal but rather context dependent. For instance, cultural anthropologists -usually inclined to certain degree of moral relativism- say that something one culture might consider highly valuable (i.e. virginity, freedom or honesty...
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  • Ethic and Relativism
    Our text discusses the challenge relativism presents to various ethical and religious viewpoints. Consider a specific moral question which might make it difficult to accept the relativist's response. State the moral issue involved, and provide an explanation as to why you think a relativist might...
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  • Bus4070
    shall consider the following issues: (i) What is moral philosophy, and how does it apply to business? (ii) What do we know of the two broad classifications of moral philosophy: teleology and deontology? (iii) What is the relativist perspective from which many ethical and unethical decisions are...
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  • Ch 1 Need for Ethics
    down the number(s) of the page(s) on which the author’s passage appears. If the author’s idea triggers a response in your mind—such as a question, a connection between this idea and something else you’ve read, or an experience of your own that supports or challenges what the author says—write it...
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  • Relativism
    principles that all societies accept. It is difficult to know whether this is really true because so many social scientists disagree about this issue as they claim there are no universally accepted moral rules at all. We do not need to resolve this issue in order to consider the question concerning...
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  • Philosophy
    no such thing as falsehood. Unfortunately, this would make Protagoras's own profession meaningless, since his business is to teach people how to persuade others of their own beliefs. It would be strange to tell others that what they believe is true but that they should accept what you say...
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  • Singer
    Against this background understanding of the origins of morality, I turn to some recent scientific research that helps us to understand more specific moral decisions and behavior. To explore the way in which people reach moral judgments, Jonathan Haidt, a psychologist at the University of Virginia...
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  • Ethical Theory Summary
    ethical relativist who makes the judgment that one society is better than another contradicts himself. (E.g., Consider the judgment that the present German state is a better society than Nazi Germany was in the 1940's.) To reach such a conclusion, the relativist would need to appeal to an ethical...
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  • Philisopical Views on Helping the Poor
    position. For example, Kirk believes that helping the poor represents a moral act to whatever extent one is motivated to do so by “genuine concern to accomplish that which is good.” While that aspect of his philosophy makes sense, Kirk absolutely distinguishes the lesser moral quality of...
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  • Semantics
    tantamount to judging their utterance to be correct. For it will not make a difference which standard of taste we consider relevant. So it is not, according to the deflationist relativist, a complete coincidence that formal semantics should employ the word “true.” For if we were working out a...
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  • Philo
    , moral codes). (Many normative ethical relativist arguments run from premises about ethics to conclusions that assert the relativity of truth values, bypassing general claims about the nature of truth, but it is often more illuminating to consider the type of relativism under question directly...
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  • Utilitarianism
    share with ethical beliefs the features which make them only relatively and not absolutely true. But both (i) and (ii) are doubtful, or at least very difficult for ethical relativists to hold consistently with their relativism. The relativist's main reason for thinking that ethical beliefs can't...
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  • Consumer Behaviour
    . The black box model considers the buyers response as a result of a conscious, rational decision process, in which it is assumed that the buyer has recognized the problem. However, in reality many decisions are not made in awareness of a determined problem by the consumer. Black box model...
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  • Ethics
    justice, overlook, for example, the moral role of attachment to those close to us. Speaking from the perspective of medical ethics, "The care perspective is especially meaningful for roles such as parent, friend, physician, and nurse, in which contextual response, attentiveness to subtle clues, and the...
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  • Ethiopian Wedding
    arrogance and promote tolerance. Normative moral relativists can also argue that judging other cultures is misguided since there are no trans-cultural criteria to which one can refer in order to justify one’s judgment. Normative moral relativism is mostly considered as an additional idea to that...
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  • Business
    and perhaps with their own culture’s values and legal system. Figure 10–1 shows a two-by-two matrix that relativists might use to make multicultural decisions. As business becomes more global and multinational corporations proliferate, the chances of ethical conflict increase. GLOBAL VALUES Many...
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  • Values in Tension
    core human values, which determine the absolute moral threshold for all business activities. D Respect for local traditions. DTbe belief that context matters when deciding what is rigbt and what is wrong. Consider those principles in action. In Japan, people doing business together often exchange...
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  • Critical Evaluation of Karen Horney's Theory
    not regard as convincing evidence, since he admits the possibility that by repeating painful experience in games children might wish to master the unpleasant situation which in reality they had to bear passively. With regard to repetitive traumatic incidents in dreams, Freud himself considers another...
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  • Welfare
    1's values are right and society 2's values are wrong, we relativize the moral claim involved to the culture in question. Given the many cultures and societies around the world, the ethical relativist then concludes that all moral claims must be relativized in this way. Of course, we also know that...
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  • Criticisms Against Ethical Theories
    encouragement they need to attain moral maturity, while others will not, through no fault of their own. Virtue Ethics, however, embraces moral luck, arguing that the vulnerability of virtues is an essential feature of the human condition, which makes the attainment of the good life all the more...
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