• Paradise Lost and Rape of the Lock
    Humour still whate'er we lose? And trust me, dear! good Humour can prevail, When Airs, and Flights, and Screams, and Scolding fail. Beauties in vain their pretty Eyes may roll; Charms strike the Sight, but Merit wins the Soul. (V:25-34) Here, Clarissa tries to persuade Belinda to change her...
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  • The Significance of Clarissa
    . Clarissa's speech is significant because it states the moral of the poem: "Beauties in vain their pretty eyes may roll; / Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul" (V, 33-34). These two lines not only represent the ending of Clarissa's speech, but it concludes her thoughts and states the...
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  • charms strike the soul
    , or race. Piety was merit; he came up to it. Similarly while carrying on discussion, in context of "Charms Strikes The Sight But Merit Wins The Soul",on the current scenario of women status in society,fair complexion,ideal height,slim figure and unveiling are considered to be merit for...
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  • Analysis of the Rape of the Lock
    poem or Canto V, the character Clarissa, in a harsh manner, ridicules Pope’s social circle. Pope ends Clarissa's speech with, "Beauties in vain their pretty eyes may role; Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul" (Pope, 5. 33-34). With that final statement, Pope was able to relay the...
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  • Gender Dialectic and Myth of Passive Womanhood in Rape of the Lock
    to rely on inner grace; “Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul” While the comment strikes a stinging chord with Belinda, the court does not find merit in the idea that women’s inner values are important. “Clarissa” the dame, sounds a title feminist for her time. The...
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  • The Rape of the Lock
    eyes may roll; 34 Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul." 35      So spoke the dame, but no applause ensu'd; 36 Belinda frown'd, Thalestris call'd her prude. 37 "To arms, to arms!" the fierce virago cries, 38 And swift as lightning to the combat flies. 39 All...
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  • M.a English
    power to use, And keep good humor still whate’er we lose? And trust me, dear, good humor can prevail When airs, and flights, and screams, and scolding fail. Beauties in vain their pretty eyes may roll; Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul.” So spoke the dame, but no applause ensued...
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  • Poetry
    sight, but merit wins the soul." So spoke the dame, but no applause ensu'd; Belinda frown'd, Thalestris call'd her prude. "To arms, to arms!" the fierce virago cries, And swift as lightning to the combat flies. All side in parties, and begin th' attack; Fans clap, silks rustle, and tough...
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  • alexander pope poems
    Scolding fail. Beauties in vain their pretty Eyes may roll; Charms strike the Sight, but Merit wins the Soul. So spake the Dame, but no Applause ensu'd; Belinda frown'd, Thalestris call'd her Prude. To Arms, to Arms! the fierce Virago cries, And swift as Lightning to the Combate flies. All...
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  • Comparison of Pope and Swift
    nature or function. He offers some warnings towards the end of his poem, that is simply advice about not focusing on the external things that can fade. Clarissa says that "Beauties in vain their pretty eyes may roll; Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul." Keener sums up Pope's point here in...
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  • Self Reliance (Translated)
    as charming, just as interesting, and just as pleasing about every stage of life, from childhood to old age. Infancy has no monopoly on charm. Take exactly what you are and find the magnificence of it and express it. Do not weep for younger years or think things will be great only when you get older...
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  • My Documents
    their charms. We know wherein its power lies, and we protest that the graces and favors are due, not to the gold or the silver, the brass or aluminum of the Medal, but to our faith in the merits of Christ crucified, to the efficacious prayers of the holy Father St. Benedict, and to the blessings which...
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  • Important Quote from Othello
    my soul, a lie, a wicked lie. * Iago tells Emilia to shut up and home: Go to, charm your tongue... What, are you mad? I charge you, get you home...Come, hold your peace... Be wise, and get you home. * This time, Emilia won’t obey him: 'Tis proper I obey him, but not now. Perchance, Iago, I...
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  • othelo
    easy     The inclining Desdemona to subdue     In any honest suit. She's framed as fruitful     As the free elements. And then for her     To win the Moor, were't to renounce his baptism,     All seals and symbols of redeemed sin,     His soul is so enfetter'd to her love,     That she may...
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  • Othello Play
    indeed the course To win the Moor again? For 'tis most easy The inclining Desdemona to subdue In any honest suit: she's framed as fruitful As the free elements. And then for her To win the Moor--were't to renounce his baptism, All seals and symbols of redeemed sin, His soul is so enfetter'd to...
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  • Napoleon
    military matters by studying the campaigns of great military leaders of the past. The French Revolution and the European wars broadened Napoleon's sights and presented him with new opportunities. Napoleon was a supporter of the French Revolution; he went back and forth between Paris and Ajaccio...
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  • I Dont Know
    didst thou get to Benares? My heart has been heavy since we parted.’ ‘The woman wearied me by constant flux of talk and requiring charms for children. I separated myself from that company, permitting her to acquire merit by gifts. She is at least a woman of open hands, and I made a promise to...
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  • The Mourning Bride
    , discovers ALMERIA in Mourning, LEONORA waiting in Mourning. After the Musick ALMERIA rises from her Chair, and comes forward. ALM. Musick has Charms to sooth a savage Breast, To soften Rocks, or bend a knotted Oak. I've read, that things inanimate have mov'd, And, as with living Souls, have been...
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  • Dylan
    deplete such cleverness? Every amount of his “playboy” ability melted away into an abyss. By the strike of Cupid’s arrow and the fate brought upon by St. Valentine, he treasured only one precious enigma, one body to lust on, one heart he sought to win, one lady who dresses herself up in white. Oh...
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  • An Essay of Criticism
    gen'rous Critick fann'd the Poet's Fire, And taught the World, with Reason to Admire. Then Criticism the Muse's Handmaid prov'd, To dress her Charms, and make her more belov'd; But following Wits from that Intention stray'd; Who cou'd not win the Mistress, woo'd the Maid; Against the Poets...
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