• Julius Ceasar
    Julius Quote Response Brutus gives his thoughts of killing Caesar in William Shakespeare’s tragedy Julius Caesar act 2 scene 1. In Brutus’s soliloquy he reveals how Caesar “might change his nature” (4). Brutus also states “he may do danger” (8). What Brutus is referring to is if Caesar gets crowned...
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  • Discuss in Detail Act 2, Scene 1, Line 1 to 59, Paying Particular Attention to the Developing Character of Brutus
    Caesar by Shakespeare the first scene in Act 2 is significant because it shows that Brutus has no true reason for wanting to kill Caesar and his argument for such deed is based on presumptions rather than facts. His soliloquy provides the audience with insight into his character and personality. Language...
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  • Shakespeare
    Caesar and Macbeth, Shakespeare gives both tragic heroes; Brutus and Macbeth a soliloquy. While their stories are very different, they both have to make a decision on if they truly want to murder a person. In comparison of the two soliloquys, Macbeth focuses more on reasons why he should not commit murder...
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  • THe Day the Earth Stood Still
    i 1. What is a soliloquy? What purpose does it serve? What do we learn from Brutussoliloquy in lines 10-35 at the beginning of Act II? A soliloquy is a speech given by a character alone onstage. It serves to let the audience know the character’s feelings. We learn that Brutus is troubled and is...
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  • Act 2 Scene 1
    ACT II, SCENE 1 Annotate Brutussoliloquy from Scene 1. What does his soliloquy reveal about his character? It must be by his death; and for my part, I know no personal cause to spurn at him, But for the general. He would be crowned. How that might change his nature, there’s the question. It...
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  • Why Marc Antony Is a Round Character
    real self after Caesar's death. That also shows that he is unpredictable. Antony's monologues and soliloquies really help to show readers Antony as a round character. A few traits these soliloquies and monologues show are that he is manipulative and smart, yet also caring and loving. Other traits...
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  • Blood imagery of play julius caesar by shakespeare
    literary techniques. Here are some additional examples: 1. Perhaps the most significant figure of speech is the metaphor from Act IV, Scene 3, in which Brutus refuses to listen to the advice of Cassius to not march to Philippi, but rather let the triumvirate's troops come to them: There is a tide in the...
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  • Conflicting Perspectives: Shakespeare's Julius Caesar
    must bend his body, If Caesar carelessly but nod on him. • The representation of the conspirators as envious is furthered by Cassius’ speech to Brutus. • Cassius claims that the “subject” of his story is “honour”, however any message of “honour” is undermined through Shakespeare’s representation of...
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  • Julius Caesar Conflicting Perspectives
    and how they are in conflict. Similar plot devices are employed by creators to achieve same effect. The meeting in the orchard shows how Cassius and Brutus are in conflict as characters and in conflict with Caesar. Suzanne Collins’ 2009 novel Catching Fire uses similar techniques in the events before and...
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  • Honor and Vengeance
    of Mark Antony and Brutus in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar December 12, 2012 Mrs. Schultheis English 2 People have always been interested in power and what people will do to get such power. Such is the case with Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, in which the two characters Brutus and Mark Antony have...
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  • Jceasar Questions
    express it? 7. What mood is created at the beginning of the play? Scene II Setting : a street in Rome; Caesar, his wife Calpurnia, Antony, Brutus and others are on their way to the running races being held to celebrate the feast of Lupercalia 1. Why does Caesar tell his wife to stand ‘in...
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  • Julius Ceaser
    against Caesar. 4. Cassius uses Brutus’s loyalty to the city of Rome to try and persuade him that Caesar is bad and is only going to hurt the city Brutus holds so dearly. 6. In Caesars speech we learn that he has no trust in Cassius and wants to be surrounded in his presence for he knows somethign...
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  • Mark Antony
    grasps that he must deal with Brutus, and he has the shrewdness to take advantage of Brutus' naïveté. When he has his servant say that "Brutus is noble, wise, valiant, and honest," it is clear that Antony intends to flatter Brutus and to work upon those personal qualities of Brutus that represent moral strengths...
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  • Julius Caesar
    alliance. The relationship between Brutus and Caesar is not a true friendship as it is just merely a political alliance forged by Brutus, in order to successfully carry out the conspiracy. In the plays second scene, along time before the conspiracy forms, Brutus tells Cassius that, “I love him well”...
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  • Act 2 Scene 1 Extended Response Julius Caesar.
    Act 2 Scene 1 in William Shakespeare’s play, Julius Caesar is a very important one. It is where Brutus reflects about tyranny, power and its nature, and Julius Caesar. He also receives an anonymous letter asking him to “Speak, Strike, Redress!” against Caesar for the good of Rome. Eventually he meets...
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  • Poop
    assassination in a dramatic soliloquy, “[Caesar] as a serpent’s egg | Which, hatched, would as his kind grows mischievous,” the biblical symbol compares Caesar to a contextually relevant satanic creature to a religious audience, underlining his potential abuse of power. In the forum scene, Brutus extols the virtues...
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  • Caturbury Tales
    dishonorable means". In The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Brutus takes the role of the tragic hero. Brutus's honor, nobility, and self-righteousness makes him "a tragic figure, if not the hero" (Catherine C. Dominic). As the play opens, Brutus is known as a Roman nobleman and a member of one of the...
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  • Jc Questions
    Questions: 1. What reason does Brutus give in his soliloquy for killing Caesar 2. What do the letters addressed to Brutus say? 3. Why can't Lucius identify the men with Cassius? 4. Why does Brutus oppose the idea of swearing an oath? 5. Why does Brutus object to Cicero joining the conspiracy...
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  • Julius Caesar
    study guide. Act I 1) Judging from the events in Act I, the political mood and behavior of the Romans are best described how? 2) When we first see Brutus, he appears to be ________________________. 3) Which line from Act I foreshadows what will happen to Caesar? 4) “Truly, sir… I am but, as you would...
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  • (Julius Caesar) Brutus: a Tragic Hero
    Brutus: A Tragic Hero By Chad Gingery In the play Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare, Brutus is a tragic hero for he was easily manipulated, naive and patriotic. Brutus believed that the Romans wanted him as the leader to assassinate Caesar, because of the forged notes that were sent to him by Cassius...
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