• Julius Ceasar
    Julius Quote Response Brutus gives his thoughts of killing Caesar in William Shakespeare’s tragedy Julius Caesar act 2 scene 1. In Brutus’s soliloquy he reveals how Caesar “might change his nature” (4). Brutus also states “he may do danger” (8). What Brutus is referring to is if Caesar gets...
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  • Discuss in Detail Act 2, Scene 1, Line 1 to 59, Paying Particular Attention to the Developing Character of Brutus
    In the play Julius Caesar by Shakespeare the first scene in Act 2 is significant because it shows that Brutus has no true reason for wanting to kill Caesar and his argument for such deed is based on presumptions rather than facts. His soliloquy provides the audience with insight into his character...
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  • Shakespeare
    Faith Moore Mr. Wells English IV 11/8/12 In the plays Julius Caesar and Macbeth, Shakespeare gives both tragic heroes; Brutus and Macbeth a soliloquy. While their stories are very...
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  • THe Day the Earth Stood Still
    Adam Kapadia Miss Sauline English 2 Honors, Period 3 19 November 2013 Act II of Julius Caesar Review Sheet ENG2H Act II, Scene i 1. What is a soliloquy? What purpose does it serve? What do we learn from Brutussoliloquy in lines 10-35 at the beginning of Act II? A soliloquy is a...
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  • Act 2 Scene 1
    ACT II, SCENE 1 Annotate Brutussoliloquy from Scene 1. What does his soliloquy reveal about his character? It must be by his death; and for my part, I know no personal cause to spurn at him, But for the general. He would be crowned. How that might change his nature, there’s the question...
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  • Why Marc Antony Is a Round Character
    starts showing his real self after Caesar's death. That also shows that he is unpredictable. Antony's monologues and soliloquies really help to show readers Antony as a round character. A few traits these soliloquies and monologues show are that he is manipulative and smart, yet also caring and...
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  • Julius Ceaser
    what he will have to do to his good friend Caesar, but its for the good of Rome? 3. Brutus’s soliloquy shows that he is thinking that he dose not want to betray Caesar but he can not let anything happen to his fear city of Rome. 4. In this piece Brutus is saying that mans ambition is very fickle...
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  • Jceasar Questions
    Caesar’s tendency to tyranny? 17. What further plans does Cassius reveal in his soliloquy? Empathic task. We have heard a lot from Cassius in this scene, but only a little from Brutus. Imagine you are Brutus at the end of the scene. Write your thoughts on Caesar, Cassius and the general situation...
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  • Blood imagery of play julius caesar by shakespeare
    climber-upward turns his face; But when he once attains the upmost round, He then unto the ladder turns his back,(2.1.22-25) 2. In this passage from the soliloquy of Brutus, "ambition's ladder" is a metaphor for Caesar's desire for power which can lead to tyranny as expressed by "the ladder...
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  • Julius Caesar Conflicting Perspectives
    letters from the Plebeians to Brutus saying that they are dissatisfied with Caesar and do not wish him to be king. One of the main ways Shakespeare communicates conflicting perspectives is through soliloquies. Soliloquies give the audience the advantage of being privy to the characters personal thoughts...
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  • Conflicting Perspectives: Shakespeare's Julius Caesar
    which he passes his opinion of Caesar • His contempt for the plebeians • His scorn at Caesar’s epileptic fit • This effectively positions us to question the reliability of his recount. Shakespeare’s Representation of the Conspirators CASSIUS (Soliloquy end of Act 1, scene ii) Well, Brutus, thou...
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  • Honor and Vengeance
    , Brutus makes a soliloquy and declares to himself, It must be by his death, and for my part I know no personal cause to spurn at him But for the general. He would be crowned, (II,I,10-13). With these words Shakespeare showed how Brutus followed his moral compass in his actions, even if it was...
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  • Mark Antony
    Cassius' assessment of him as being a "shrewd contriver." Following the assassination, Antony quickly grasps that he must deal with Brutus, and he has the shrewdness to take advantage of Brutus' naïveté. When he has his servant say that "Brutus is noble, wise, valiant, and honest," it is clear that Antony...
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  • Julius Caesar
    unknowingly believes that Brutus is still his good friend, allowing Brutus to use this to his advantage as Caesar does not expect a “true” friend to be a threat. The evidence of this is clear in Antony’s soliloquy after Caesars death. He states that Brutus was “Caesar's angel” and “Caesar loved him...
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  • Act 2 Scene 1 Extended Response Julius Caesar.
    may become a danger to the ‘general good’ and the public welfare. He philosophises and has an entire soliloquy about power and what happens when people are given a position of high authority, in Caesars case, king. Brutus believes that it is the nature of tyrants to disjoin ‘remorse from power...
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  • Jc Questions
    Act II, Scene 1 Questions: 1. What reason does Brutus give in his soliloquy for killing Caesar 2. What do the letters addressed to Brutus say? 3. Why can't Lucius identify the men with Cassius? 4. Why does Brutus oppose the idea of swearing an oath? 5. Why does Brutus object to...
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  • Who Is Brutus?
    Shakespeare expresses Brutus as enigmatic and ambivalent despite his strong moral stance, honour and integrity as a soldier. Through the use of soliloquies, Shakespeare conveys the complexities of Brutus and examines him as a devoted patriot, master to his servants, a husband, and a dignified...
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  • Julius Caesar
    ideas. Act II 16) In his soliloquy, Brutus reveals his true feelings about whom? 17) As Act II progresses, Portia becomes more ___________________ 18) Cassius, as a foil, influences Brutus in what ways? 19) Caesar’s initial decision to stay at home rather than to go to the Senate is a response...
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  • (Julius Caesar) Brutus: a Tragic Hero
    live.!(3.2.216). From this powerful speech and Brutus' naïveté, Antony became his nemesis, an event that would ultimately lead to Brutus' downfall. Brutus had an overabundance of love for his country which blinded him to the truth. Brutus had said in one of his soliloquies, If then that a friend...
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  • Yehdjscmvb
    Dylan Miller Goldhammer LA 10 Honors 1st 4 December 2012 The Speeches of Brutus & Antony After the death of Caesar, both Brutus and Antony give speeches to the people, with varied results, with Antony delivering a more convincing speech compared to Brutussoliloquy. Brutus’s speech...
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