Arlene Skolnick Essays and Term Papers

  • Changes in the American Family

    substantial divorce rate, and "an older generation of neighbors or relatives who tried to tell them how to run their lives and raise their kids." (Skolnick 33) It's this sense that their children see the world so differently that's so hard for working-class parents. "For it seems to say that now, along...

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  • Rise and Fall of the Conch

    beings who are not fully competent to determine and safeguard their interests.” (Skolnick, 38) Works Cited Golding, William. The Lord of the Flies. 1954. Penguin Group (USA) Inc. 2006. Print. Skolnick, Arlene. "Limits of Childhood: Conceptions of Child Development and Social Context, The."...

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  • Analysis of Shutter Island

    thoughts, but teachers cannot do it alone. I believe the teaching of good sound morals and values have to begin at home. References Skolnick, Arlene; Skolnick, Jerome. (2009). Family in Transition. Boston: Pearson Higher Education Company Loury, Glenn C. (November 1995). Values and judgments:...

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  • argument paper

    making the mother available “full time” in the home most aspects of crime were lower and people showed a more positive outlook on life. While Arlene Skolnick argues that the current state of society has nothing to do with the decline of the traditional family, “headed by a breadwinner and housewife”...

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  • The Effects of Divorce

    aggression, social and emotional well- being and cognition and perception, (A & J Skolnick p. 349). Most research shows that boys are more vulnerable than girls to divorce related stress and recover more slowly. A. and J. Skolnick offer the possibility that living with the opposite sex is more difficult than...

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  • Family and Society

    the "good old days". People always look back and say those were the best times. Families from the past seem to have more moral values than today (Skolnick #21). They respected their elders and the dead. The families from the past just seemed more simple than today. Maybe it is because of television...

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  • Theessy

    Marriage and Public Policy. Gilbert, Neil. “Working Families: Hearth to Market” in All Our Families: New Policies for a New Century. Mary Ann Mason, Arlene Skolnick, and Stephen D. Sugarman, eds. Oxford University Press, 1998. Hewlett, Sylvia Ann. When the Bough Breaks: The Cost of Neglecting Our Children....

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  • How Marriage Has Changed

    why are nearly 90% of Americans getting married in today’s society? This marriage rate is only 5% down from the all-time high reached in the 1950s (Skolnick, 96-103). Marriage is no longer viewed as a social requirement. Single people can accomplish just as much as married people. My opinion on this is...

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  • Transformation of Marriage:

    what has been called the "psychological revolution"—a transformation in the way people look at marriage, parenthood, and their lives in general." (Skolnick p.171) At first blush, marriage in America seems to have followed a similar course. Once a required rite of passage, seen as a genuine embodiment...

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  • Family Decline vs Family Change

    eroded as an institution and no longer takes care of its members, has been a dominant feature of family discourse in recent years (Popenoe, 1993, Skolnick, 1991). However, data suggest that it is not total withdrawal of care and tenderness towards the elderly. The fact is that due to the economic difficulties...

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  • The Effects of Divorce on Children.

    children in intact families. They are more likely to evaluate their parents unfavorably, are more pessimistic about their own future wedding, ( A & J Skolnick p. 351). The Skolnick's point out that 10 to 30% of children in divorced families perceive rejection from their father, devalue the noncustodial parent...

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  • The Blind Obedience in “the Lottery”

    which are not really obvious and are needed to be revealed. In Embattled Paradise: The American Family in an Age of Uncertainty (1991), the author Arlene Skolnick goes on about the contrasting visions of 1950s that shadowed some light on the peaceful images of family life that seemed to have appeared in situational...

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  • Indian Child and Childhood: from the Eyes of the Teacher

    Darwinism (Skolnick , 1975; Kessen,1965) with ‘development’ becoming the guiding metaphor for theorizing about children, it placed all non-standard groups –the young, old, deviant into inferior positions, seen only in terms of their negative attributes. Von Bertalanffy ( as cited in Skolnick, 1975) calls...

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  • Marriage Pattern of the Gbandi Tribe

    the risks of early childbearing and may also impede improvements in their educational, economic, and social status. REFERENCES Skolnick, Arlene. "Marriage." Microsoft® Student 2009 [DVD]. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Corporation, 2008. Microsoft ® Encarta ® 2009. © 1993-2008 Microsoft Corporation...

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  • Sociolization

    Conceiving the Self. New York: Basic Books. Rosenthal, Robert and L. Jacobson 1968 Pygmalion in the Classroom. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston. Skolnick, Arlene 1991 Embattled Paradise: The American Family in an Age of Uncertainty. New York: Basic Books. Steinmetz, Suzanne K. 1999 ‘‘Adolescence in Contemporary...

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  • Working Mother

    home has become an option for many mothers, and more companies are exploring flex-time for their employees The Rhetoric and reality of “opting out” (Skolnick,pg 365). It has many interesting elements one being that many women are quitting their high paying salary careers to stay home because of the inflexible...

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  • A Summary of Skolnick's 'Working Personality'

    A Summary of Skolnick’s “Working Personality” CRMJ-2010 In “A Sketch of the Policeman’s Working Personality,” Jerome Skolnick discusses and analyzes how a police officer’s personal outlook is affected by his or her involvement in police work, creating an “us versus them” mind-set, as well...

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  • Policing

    CRJ 110 Chapter 6 Assignment 3 Jerome Skolnick developed a profile for the “working personality” of police officers. His theory is that all officers have “distinct cognitive tendencies”, or they all possess certain traits in the way that they think. The three elements of the police personality that...

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  • Mommy Wars

    television shows and read articles and are completely intrigue with what they have to say. According to “The Family and Transitions” book, by Skolnick and Skolnick (2010), the stay at home mother is known as “traditional mother”. The stay at home mother is more committed to the ideology of intense mothering...

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  • The Culture of Being a Police Officer

    their spouses and families (Drummond, 1976 and Skolnick, 1966). Police impose social isolation upon themselves as a means of protection against real and perceived dangers, loss of personal and professional autonomy, and social rejection (Skolnick, 1966). Skolnick found. The element of danger is generally...

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