• antigone
    states that men is the greatest creation on earth. The chorus says, “Numberless are the world's wonders, but none more wonderful than man” (Sophocles 332). Also O’Brien writes, “Humanity´s awesome, violent capacity to overcome its natural enemies the sea, the earth, and the animal kingdom, forms the...
    Premium 730 Words 3 Pages
  • Antigone: Catharsis Analysis
     Sympathy for Others As stated by Sophocles in Antigone, "Numberless are the world's wonders, but none More wonderful than man" (Ode 1 1-2). Landscapes like the grand canyon, the wide expanse of oceans, weather, tall mountains are all magnificent features, but none as great as Man. Man is the...
    Premium 1142 Words 5 Pages
  • Antigone
    world so demoralizing as money. -Numberless are the world's wonders, but none More wonderful than man. -Even the stout of heart shrink when they see the approach of death. -There is nothing worse than disobedience to authority. It destroys cities. -A wise man has much to learn without a loss of...
    Premium 1528 Words 7 Pages
  • Antigone - 7
    kingdom by establishing such an inhuman law. Isn't it ironic? 6. - Give an example of an epic simile from Antigone. Ode 1 Strophe 1 CHORUS 1 Numberless are the world's wonders, but none 2 More wonderful than man; the stormgray sea 3 Yields to his prows, the huge crests bear him high...
    Premium 2218 Words 9 Pages
  • Greek
    in the electronical world. What happened to fighting for your own grace. God created people out of love and gave them intellect. We are beautiful creatures. “Wonders are many, and none is more wonderful than man” Sophocles, Antigone. Wonders can be different for all of us. They can be emotional...
    Premium 336 Words 2 Pages
  • Antigone and the Scarlet Ibis Comparison
    Antigone and The Scarlet Ibis Comparison "Numberless wonders terrible wonders walk the world but none the match for man", said the chorus in the play Antigone (Sophocles 366-367). The common theme of man is shown in the books Antigone by Sophocles in Creon and The Scarlet Ibis by James Hurst in...
    Premium 614 Words 3 Pages
  • INTRODUCTION
    from them in the end. [Enter CREON into the Palace.] SENTRY: “Bring me the man” ––! I’d like nothing better than bringing him the man! But bring him or not, you have seen the last of me here. At any rate, I am safe! [Exit SENTRY.] ODE I CHORUS: Numberless are the world’s wonders, but none...
    Premium 10059 Words 41 Pages
  • Antigone (Full Play)
    not, you have seen the last of me here. At any rate, I am safe! [Exit Sentry.] Ode I CHORUS Numberless are the world's wonders, but none More wonderful than man; the storm gray sea Yields to his prows, the huge crests bear him high; Earth, holy and inexhaustible, is graven With shining...
    Premium 9222 Words 37 Pages
  • Meds
    the chorus of Antigone sing, "Numberless are the world's wonders, but none more wonderful than man." Hamlet remarks, "What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god...
    Premium 5119 Words 21 Pages
  • aaaa
    , and his torture’s more Than man can suffer, as yourselves will see. For lo, the palace portals are unbarred, And soon ye shall behold a sight so sad That he who must abhorred would pity it. [Enter OEDIPUS blinded.] 52 Oedipus the Kin – Sophocles OEDIPUS CHORUS (Str. 1) Woeful...
    Premium 38607 Words 155 Pages
  • Eodipus vs. Antigone: in the Eyes of the Gods
    his speech takes an ominous turn, “If I can drive out this corruption and make the city whole, I shall do more than save my people...I shall save myself.” (pg 190) Indicating that even when he is prepared to make sacrifices and serve the god[s] to save his city, his actions are ultimately self-serving...
    Premium 2380 Words 10 Pages
  • Gender Bias Critic of Antigone
    interprets this ode slightly different from Goldhill, stating that the ode reflects, "many are the wonders but nothing more wonderful than man," where Goldhill debates the interpretation. Goldhill writes that the ode implies that the "all-inventive man comes to the nothingness that is his future." The chant...
    Premium 2361 Words 10 Pages
  • The Role of Archetypes in Myth Making
    the unknown; it is about that for which initially we have no words. Myth therefore looks into the heart of the great silence,” wrote Karen Armstrong (2005, p. 4). In the modern world, myth lives and, in the USA, it lives more than most places. There’s the continuing “city upon a hill” saga (from...
    Premium 3813 Words 16 Pages
  • Amal
    , beyond hope and thought, I owe the gods great thanks. The GUARD goes out on the spectators' left. CHORUS singing strophe 1 Wonders are many, and none is more wonderful than man; the power that crosses the white sea, driven by the stormy south-wind, making a path under surges that threaten to...
    Premium 12223 Words 49 Pages
  • Oedipus
    ). In Creon’s view, Antigone has overstepped the bounds of her positions as a citizen and as a human being. Antigone, of course, has none of these worldly concerns. She is prepared to die for what she believes is the right action in the eyes of the gods. The third choral ode is more pessimistic than...
    Premium 12146 Words 49 Pages
  • Fear for Thought
    her of the punishment given if she were to break the law. 4. Antigone is more of the brave one. She is willing to take a chance. Ismene is more conserved worrisome. She is a strict rule follower. 5. The parados talks to the audience and introduces the Chorus. 6. The Chorus celebrates the Theban...
    Premium 1384 Words 6 Pages
  • African History
    for us To fight against men; our rulers are stronger than we, And we must obey in this, or in worse than this. May the dead forgive me, I can do no other But as I am commanded; to do more is madness. ANTIGONE: No; then I will not ask you for your help. Nor would I thank you for it, if you...
    Premium 3960 Words 16 Pages
  • theme of alienation n no where man by kamala markandeya
    of Hellenic culture, many centuries before Sophocles’ time. All the scenes take place in front of the royal palace at Thebes. Thus Sophocles conforms to the principle of the unity of place. The events unfold in little more than twenty four hours. The play begins on the night when Antigone attempts...
    Premium 23273 Words 94 Pages
  • Sophocles
    first prize twenty times, more than any other Greek tragedian. Sophocles wrote more than 120 tragedies, only a mear seven have survived. “Plutarch tells us that there were three periods in Sophocles’s literary development: imitation of the grand style of Aeschylus, use of artificial and...
    Premium 1515 Words 7 Pages
  • English Literature
    wonders in the world, but nothing more wonderful than a human” (332–83). But Sophokles’ heroes are not always comfortable to be with, nor are they wholly admirable, nor do we get the idea that we are to emulate these examples. Antigone is her stubborn father’s daughter – a predominantly fifth-century...
    Premium 159487 Words 638 Pages