"A Wicked Woman By Jack London" Essays and Research Papers

  • A Wicked Woman By Jack London

    Jack London Some say he was “the successor to Poe” (Unger). Was he truly the successor to Edgar Allen Poe? Jack London believed in a fine line between Social Darwinism and social justice, and individualism and socialism. He reflected his beliefs into all of his novels and stories. American writer, Jack London, made a successful career out of his experiences and adventures. JackLondon was born in San Francisco, the illegitimate child of Flora Wellman” on January 12, 1876 (Jack London St). It...

    Glen Ellen, California, Jack London, Jack London State Historic Park 1690  Words | 5  Pages

  • Jack London

    Jack London This writer is often called by an embodiment of an American dream. He created himself, counting only on the forces and the persistent work. Within 18 years he didn't put down a notebook where wrote down all the thoughts and supervision which could be useful to him in work and that wouldn't occur, daily created 5 pages of texts. Him called Jack London. He was born on 12th of January in 1876 in San Francisco where his parents - Flora Wellman, the daughter of the ruined wheaten magnate...

    Jack London, Kittredge Haskins, Marriage 922  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London

    Jack London, an American author known for his thrilling adventure stories, showed the world that even an exciting story that takes place in exotic settings can include all the intricacies of great literature. This is seen in many of his stories with the implementation of symbolism, many times a recurring theme in his work. Also, London used many ideas of the day such as Darwinism and Spencerism in his writings in order to better portray his views. However, perhaps one of the most telling signs that...

    Carl Jung, Jack London, Klondike Gold Rush 1217  Words | 3  Pages

  • Family and Jack London

    2011 The Famous Life of Jack London Jack London is one of the greatest natural writers. When jack was a child, he lived a very awkward and hectic life. As jack got older he got married twice and had three kids. He also wrote a lot about nature and wildlife in his books. However, by jacks forties he died. Jack London will always be known for his natural writing. Jack London was born in San Francisco, California in 1876 (Hart). He was the son of an unmarried woman named Flora Wellman who was...

    An Unmarried Woman, Family, Flora 1280  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack London’s “A Wicked Woman”

    29 February 2012 “London’s ‘A Wicked Woman’: A Reading Response” Jack London’s “A Wicked Woman” is a short story depicting the troubled love life of a young woman named Loretta. London rapidly introduces the reader to a large cast of characters in the first two paragraphs. I found this story similar to a modern pulp fiction romance novel. London lures the reader into feeling sorrow for Loretta’s troubles. I had questions roaming in my mind pondering what Billy might have done to Loretta, to leave...

    American films, English-language films, Woman 696  Words | 2  Pages

  • Jack London

    Jack London's short story The Law of Life follows Koskoosh, an elder member of an indigenous tribe in the Klondike, through his final living hours. Because of the harsh environment, scarcity of food, and the importance of the group's survival, the tribe abandons the blind, old man in the tundra with only a fire burning nearby and a few pieces of wood to sustain it. While the man waits for death, the reader learns, through Koskoosh's memory, of his life, his tribe's traditions, and the laws of nature...

    A Story, Death, Gerontology 1501  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack London and Nature

    Francisco in 1876, he was abandoned shortly after birth by his father. Therefore, London took the name of his stepfather, John London. Forced to leave school at the age of fourteen and find work because of his family's poor financial situation, he joined the Klondike gold rush of 1898, returning to San Francisco broke, but with an abundance of memories and ideas. During his travels to the Klondike regions, Jack London pondered the importance of humanity. He realized, as important as humans thing they...

    Human, Humans, Jack London 2292  Words | 6  Pages

  • The World: as Jack London Sees It

    The World: As London Sees It The world as a conscious being stupefies some, as it is an awesome thought that many people ponder. The thought of the universe as a thing that picks and chooses who lives and dies terrifies some, while some welcome the idea and coexist with it. Jack London, the author of such books as The Call of the Wild, and The Sea Wolf, is one such man who lives with the idea. London views the world as a Darwinist, or with the theory of natural selection. He sees the world with...

    Biology, Gene, Jack London 2646  Words | 6  Pages

  • Jack London: Biography

    Jack London : Biography      "You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club" (BrainyQuote). This is one of Jack London's more well known quotes. Jack London was born as John Griffith Chaney on January 12, 1876, in San Francisco("Jack London"). His mother was Flora Wellman and his father was suspected to be astrologer William H. Chaney, who denied his paternity and abandoned London's mother(Wilson). London was suckled, or nursed, by an ex-slave named Virginia Prentiss, who...

    Charmian London, Family, Jack London 1301  Words | 4  Pages

  • Christopher Jack London McCandless

                              Christopher “Jack London” McCandless                                            Anna Wilson  English III Honors  Petrulla  26 November 2014  Wilson 2    Two people in two generations so different, yet so alike. Jack London, an American  author, wrote books like ​ Call of The Wild​  and ​ White Fang​ . Both were about adventure and  discovering something and that is exactly what Christopher McCandless did. Christopher  McCandless was an adventurer and a seeker of himself...

    Alaska, Christopher McCandless, Emile Hirsch 1506  Words | 7  Pages

  • Jack London Research Paper

    Whitlock Ms. Baswell English III 4 November 2014 Author: Jack London Jack London was one of America’s most celebrated writers. London (1876-1916) gained worldwide acclaim as a writer by basing his works on his own colorful worldwide exploits. “Jack London was a native Californian who achieved worldwide acclaim as a powerful storyteller, a legendary public figure, and America's most commercially successful writer” (Hogge 12). London had a remarkable talent for writing about many of issues that...

    Dog, Fiction, Jack London 2643  Words | 10  Pages

  • Jack London: to Build a Fire

    Introduction Jack London had already established himself as a popular writer when his story "To Build a Fire" appeared in the Century Magazine in 1908. This tale of an unnamed man's disastrous trek across the Yukon Territory near Alaska was well received at the time by readers and literary critics alike. While other works by London have since been faulted as overly sensational or hastily written, "To Build a Fire" is still regarded by many as an American classic. London based the story on his...

    Alaska, Canada, Cryobiology 917  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London: The Law of LIfe

    Jack London: The Law of Life Culture is the expression of our nature on how we live, interact, believe, where we gain our knowledge, and it also distinguishes people from another in divergent societies. The culture of Native Americans is so history rich and storied cultured that it cannot be easily misinterpreted by anyone that is foreign of their way of life. In “The Law of Life,” Jack London describes the culture of the Native Americans and their proclivity towards life as it revolves around...

    Afterlife, Death, Life 1895  Words | 5  Pages

  • Jack London and His Call of the Wild

    of the parts of his nature that were deeper than he, going back into the womb of Time." - Jack London, The Call of the Wild, Ch. 3 (Jack London Quotes). This quote summarizes the success of Jack London’s writing career in one simple sentence. London’s success and inspiration for his naturalist style can be accredited to the way in which he was raised, and his experiences during his lifetime. Jack London, was born John Griffith Chaney on January 12, 1876 near San Francisco, California. His mother...

    Jack London, Klondike Gold Rush, Martin Eden 1150  Words | 3  Pages

  • A Comparison on the Life of Buck and Jack London

    A COMPARISON ON THE LIFE OF BUCK AND JACK LONDON A Requirement Submitted to the Faculty of Baguio City National High School In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements in English III by Masedman, Moises Migallon, Diane Kaye January 2010 Table of Contents Title page p.i Table of contents p.ii I. Introduction p.1 II. Chapter 1 p.3 III. Chapter 2 p.6 IV. Chapter 3 p.8 V. Conclusion ...

    A Story, Dog, English-language films 1980  Words | 7  Pages

  • The Woman in Black, a London Particular

    A London Particular The Second chapter of Susan Hills chilling novel, The Woman In Black, is host to some of the conventional gothic aspects found in such ghost stories. The focus of this essay is the first eight paragraphs of the second chapter. Story telling lies at the heart of this novel and there is definite mix within the story of new and old ghost stories which would allow Susan Hill to select what she would have thought to be essential components of a successful ghost narrative. ‘A London...

    Ghost, Ghost story, Gothic fiction 1014  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London, Darwinism in Jack London, A Zoom On "Law of Life"

    Jack London,the famous american writer insisted on writing political essays in his times. He was among the most influential figures of his days,who understood how to create a public person and use the media to market his self created image of poor -boy -turned -success. One of his most remarkable works named "the call of the wild" (1903), is now accepted as a classic of world literature ,one of the most widely translated and published books by an american writer. The stduy of Jack London's work...

    Charles Darwin, Creationism, Darwinism 1085  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack London- "To Build a Fire"

    In many of Jack London’s stories, he displays the constant struggle between man and nature. In the short fiction, “To Build a Fire,” London demonstrates the human race’s inability to listen to nature when needed. The opening of “To Build a Fire” uses vivid imagery, giving you a strong idea of the cold and harsh weather. “There was no sun nor hint of sun, though there was not a cloud in the sky.” this sentence alone could set chills to the reader. (London 127-137) The imagery is meant to bring...

    Audience, Character, Dog 1124  Words | 3  Pages

  • To Build a Fire by Jack London

     Naturalism Essay    When Jack London wrote "To Build a Fire" he embraced the idea of naturalism because it  mirrored the events of daily life​ .​  Naturalism displayed how humans had to be cautious at every  corner because at anytime death could be there, waiting for them to make a mistake and forfeit  their lives​ .​  He used naturalism, the most realistic literary movement, to show how violent and  uncaring nature really is and how no matter what you do nature will always be there. London  also presente...

    English-language films, Gray Wolf, Jack London 1002  Words | 4  Pages

  • Contributions of Jack London to American Literature

    Jack London is an author known for his stories of the North. My author's contribution to American literature is gargantuan. Jack London has produced many well-known American novels. He has had a difference on the approach writers take on crafting their literature. His most well known novel "To Build A Fire" is one of the greatest American short stories ever created. In a good number of his stories the central conflict is man vs. nature. His impact on American literature has altered the way people...

    Fiction, Jack London, Klondike Gold Rush 931  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London WHITE FANG

    Jack London's full name was John Griffith London, and he was born in San Francisco. After completing grammar school, London worked at various jobs to help support his family. His life as a writer essentially began in 1893. That year he had weathered a harrowing voyage, one in which a typhoon had nearly taken out London and his crew. The 17-year-old adventurer returned home and regaled his mother with his tales of what had happened to him. When she saw an announcement in one of the local papers...

    Canidae, Canis, Coyote 1689  Words | 3  Pages

  • Naturalism in Jack Londons "To Build a Fire"

    influence. This struggle against nature is depicted by many authors of the 19th and early 20th centuries, using key concepts of naturalism and determinism, a key component of naturalist theory, as a foundation and philosophy for many of these stories. Jack London and Stephen Crane are notorious for their writings which have been regarded as cornerstones of naturalist theory in classic American literature. Stories such as "to Build a Fire", "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky”, convey themes of naturalism and...

    Charles Darwin, Determinism, Evolution 2028  Words | 5  Pages

  • Literary Analysis of Stories by Jack London

    Literary Analysis of stories by Jack London For my author project on Jack London I read three of his books. I read The Sea Wolf, which is about the hardships of being out at sea. The Call of the Wild, Which is about a dog that is sent into the wild. White Fang, which is the opposite the call of the wild where a “wolf” becomes tame. They are all interesting books all by one well-known author. For the first book I read I chose The Sea Wolf. The book is about a guy named Humphrey "Hump" Van Weyden...

    Dog, Gray Wolf, Jack London 1018  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Effects of Regionalism on the Works of Jack London

    The Affects of Regionalism on the Works of Jack London In 1903, Jack London published his novel Call of the Wild, and with it made his mark on literature in America and achieved worldwide acclaim. It’s a story of a dog named Buck, who was snatched from his luxurious home in Santa Clara, California, and transported to the Yukon Territory to work as a labor dog during the Klondike gold rush in 1897. Buck assimilates to survive among abusive men and vicious dogs, and in the process he discovers...

    Bennett Lake, Gold, Jack London 1726  Words | 5  Pages

  • A Comparison of Jack London and Stephen Crane.

    A Comparison of Jack London and Stephen Crane. Jack London and Stephen Crane were both well-known literary naturalists who died at relatively early ages. Despite having lived such a short life, Jack London lived a full life. He has achieved wide popularity abroad, with his work being translated into more than fifty languages, as well as having written fifty literary works in eighteen years. His stories in the naturalistic mode still continue to influence writers today. Stephen Crane was also an...

    Fiction, Naturalism, Nature 1493  Words | 4  Pages

  • "To Build a Fire" by Jack London Review

    Rachel Foxworth An Extremely Icy Examination What would you do if you had to trek across the frozen tundra of Alaska, in weather that was seventy-five degrees below zero? In “To Build a Fire,” by Jack London, a fictional short story, a man has to go through just that, with only a dog, some matches and a can of biscuits to help him through. As the man continues his journey, going off the designated trail, various parts of his body begin to freeze in his desperate attempt to reach...

    Antagonist, Character, Chewing tobacco 891  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London Law of Life

    reassurance. He thought of the fact that his granddaughter was still being called by life, and living very much in the present, while he was dying. “ he stretched forth a palsied hand which wandered tremblingly over the small heap of dry wood beside him.” (London). 2. Provide direct evidence showing a ceremonial similarity between the past burial of the missionary and the future burial of Little Koo – tee. “they would burn a hole through the frozen tundra and pile rocks above to keep the wolverines away...

    Death, Life, Meaning of life 900  Words | 2  Pages

  • Jack London: Famous American Writer of Animals and Nature

    Jack London Jack London is one of the most famous American writers. He wrote many great books over his short lifetime. Many of his stories are about animals and nature, which most people can relate to. Because of his great stories, he was able to be a financial success. London's books are read in most grade schools in America. To say that he was a great writer would be an understatement. Jack London, one of America's most famous writers, wrote the novel The Call of the Wild which contains many...

    Cengage Learning, Glen Ellen, California, Jack London 2680  Words | 7  Pages

  • Epiphany: Short Story and Jack London

    An Analysis of the Man’s Epiphany in “To Build a Fire” The short story “To Build a Fire,” written by Jack London, is a tragic tale of an overconfident, inexperienced man traveling through the brutal, sub-freezing conditions of the Yukon with only the companionship of a dog. The man, un-named in this story, arrogantly decides to break from the main trail to take a less traveled route against the advice of the seasoned old-timer of Sulfur Creek, who warns of traveling alone in such severe conditions...

    Cryobiology, Death, Dog 968  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    of unsolved crimes, but none has aroused the allure of Jack the Ripper’. The murders of Jack the Ripper stirred controversy and emotion at the time and continues to stimulate fascination within society, not only because of the vicious nature of the crimes but also due to the impact the Jack the Ripper murders had on society. The crimes by Jack the Ripper highlighted a number of differing views towards women prevalent in 19th Century London. In late 19th Century there was a changing attitude towards...

    18th century, 19th century, Historiography 2275  Words | 7  Pages

  • Wicked

    had not changed much; however, this time I saw it in an entirely new light was more than an adult looking at a childhood fantasyland viewing it an adult perception. My attitude towards the classic has changed after reading Gregory Maguire's "Wicked" "Wicked is the account of what happened in Oz prior to Dorothy's arrival. There are many interesting facets to the story. Most intriguing is the idea of just what is evil? How do we as a society see good and evil right and wrong? In this paper, I will...

    Dorothy Gale, Evil, Good and evil 1915  Words | 5  Pages

  • Jack London

    Both Chris McCandless and Jack London left to go into the wilderness to find their true selves. They both also had serious family issues, with McCandless’ father having a secret other family, and London’s mother attempting to shoot themselves. It is a possibility that through this they learned that humans are unpredictable, and unreliable, and as a result, they preferred to be in solitude for long periods of time, so that they would no longer be subjected to the random whims of other people. ...

    Alaska, California Gold Rush, Christopher McCandless 457  Words | 2  Pages

  • Jack London Questions and Essay on "To Build a Fire"

    one of the authors that most influenced London, Herbert Spencer. 2. What is socialism? Why was London attracted to it? Socialism is an economic system in which the means of prediction are owned and controlled by the working class. And London was attracted to it because of his experience in life gave him an insight into the terrible effects of poverty on people who had no political power. 3. What is social Darwinism? What were its origins and how did London interpret this philosophy? Social Darwinism...

    Charles Darwin, Cryobiology, Herbert Spencer 1364  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack London

    Dantean Influence in Jack London’s “To Build a Fire (II)” James I. McClintock has described Jack London’s classic short story “To Build a Fire (II)” as the “most mature expression of his pessimism” (116). In what follows, I wish to explore the possibility that there is a substantial element of spiritual allegory operative in London’s narrative. London originally conceived his tale as a moral fable and a cautionary narrative to American youth never to travel alone. To this end, London published the story...

    Beatrice Portinari, Dante Alighieri, Divine Comedy 3083  Words | 9  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    This is a brief review of the Jack the Ripper murders that occurred in London more than a hundred years ago. Much of the original evidence gathered at the time has been lost, and many "facts" are actually opinions by the various writers who have written about the case during the past century. "Jack the Ripper" is the popular name given to a serial killer who killed a number of prostitutes in the East End of London in 1888. The name originates from a letter written by someone who claimed to be the...

    Catherine Eddowes, East End of London, Jack the Ripper 765  Words | 3  Pages

  • jack the ripper

    OUTLINE SKELETON Title: Informative Speech Topic: Murders Specific Topic: Jack The Ripper General Purpose: Inform the audience about Jack the Ripper Specific Purpose: Scare the audience with my speech Thesis: INTRODUCTION Attention-getter: The days were gloomy and the nights were cold and dark. White chapel, London during the year 1888 was the perfect place for serial killer to come out of the shadows and meet there victims. Thesis Statement: And today is a perfect day...

    Crime, Jack the Ripper, Jack the Ripper fiction 965  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    Stacie Wyatt Professor Gave Composition 121 26th, July 2012 Jack the Ripper On a late evening over a hundred years ago, a serial killer started his spree of slayings, which would end up being one of the most talked about unsolved killings to this date. By typical philosophies, the eerie slayer who terrified the gloomy streets of London’s East End was nothing compared to serial killers of the present time. How could this one person fascinate a large number of individuals, since there have...

    East End of London, Jack the Ripper, Jack the Ripper suspects 1616  Words | 5  Pages

  • london

    International and historic, elegant and avant-garde, London is one of the most diverse and visually exciting cities in the world. Settle into our hotel in fashionable Kensington and set off to capture London’s palpable energy. With your camera in hand, venture into bustling Billingsgate fish market, the Columbia flower market, and iconic Portobello Road. Stroll through serene gardens, and delve into the ethnic neighborhoods of the East End to shoot portraits and street scenes and the restored warehouses...

    City of Westminster, Grade I listed buildings in London, Knightsbridge 896  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    Jack the Ripper was a murderous madman who terrorized prostitutes in the late 1880�s. Time has not diminished the gruesomeness of the killings. All the victims' throats were cut ;some victims were disemboweled ;and the killer took organs from some of his victims. When fear of the Ripper peaked, the killings stopped, and a century of speculation ensued (jack 1). Many authors have tried to sift through the evidence and have arrived at their own theories as to the identity Jack the Ripper Jack the...

    East End of London, Jack the Ripper, Jack the Ripper fiction 1407  Words | 4  Pages

  • Intellect vs. Instinct in "To Build a Fire" by Jack London

    The ignorance of the main character in To Build a Fire by Jack London is what ultimately causes his failure. He has never experienced cold like that of the Yukon Trail but is confidant, regardless, that he will reach his goal of meeting his friends at the campsite. It is the man's determination to follow his intellect rather than his instinct that reveals his ignorance. The man begins his journey relying on flawed intellect. He illogically treks through snow, wetting his boots and feet, and must...

    Freezing, Instinct, Melting point 1366  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack London

    Week 6 1 Week 6 Joseph Robbins HUM 335 Christina Baker April 21, 2013 Week 6 2 1.From “The Slaughter of Pigeons” in Chapter 6, What is the author’s claim about the ethics of hunting? What specific words does the author use to “stack the evidence” for his claim? Knowledge of the characters and their histories is not necessary to appreciate "The Slaughter of the Pigeons" because we can interpret through each character's actions Cooper's underlying message. The villagers firing haphazardly...

    Galway Kinnell 1423  Words | 4  Pages

  • Was Jack the Ripper a Social Reformer?

     Was Jack the Ripper a Social Reformer? Introduction Jack the Ripper’s identity still remains unknown, even after a century his identity still remains unknown even after killing five poor prostitutes in 19th Century Britain. His murders, all violent showed some knowledge on anatomy but some doctors insist that no knowledge was used while in the process of dissecting the victims’ bodies. He terrified the eastern part of London but what we can say is that he was a social reformer. His murders attracted...

    East End of London, Jack the Ripper, Jack the Ripper fiction 1708  Words | 5  Pages

  • Earthquake Madness and Jack London

    Earthquake Madness and Jack London, an Eyewitness Did you know that San Francisco had an earthquake that completely destroyed most of the city in 1906? The Story of an Eyewitness by Jack London is a close up detailed memoir of this event. In 1906, there was a major earthquake in San Francisco that destroyed most of the city. After the earthquake many fires broke out, forcing people out of their homes and businesses, and also there was many fatalities. Jack London uses excellent literary devices...

    1906 San Francisco earthquake, Earthquake, Fiction 628  Words | 1  Pages

  • Solving the Puzzle of Jack the Ripper

    The One Who Got Away: Solving the Puzzle of Jack the Ripper In August 1888, the dwellers of London’s East End arose from sleep to find their lives a little darker than before. Mary Ann Nichols, a prostitute, had been viciously murdered, nearly decapitated by two cuts to the throat, her abdomen displaying multiple cuts (Begg 46). Over the next three years, ten other women would be murdered in the Whitechapel area. While there is no definitive proof linking these murders to one killer, analysis...

    Jack the Ripper, Jack the Ripper: The Final Solution, James Kenneth Stephen 1510  Words | 5  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    Jack The Ripper. What actually happened ? Jack the Ripper has been the most famous serial killer of the world. His story is known everywhere of the world. Not because of the number of people he killed. Not because of the political position of the people he killed. The main reason that he became famous is the modus he used to mutilate 5 victims and he was never caught. So he was also the most horrible killer of the world. The story happened on the east end of London. In the evening of 31st of August...

    City of London, East End of London, Jack the Ripper 1120  Words | 4  Pages

  • Major Theme in to Build a Fire by Jack London

    deterministic world is based on a series of links, each of which causes the next (for more on these causal links, see Causal links and processes, below). In "To Build a Fire," London repeatedly shows how the man does not have free will and how nature has already mapped out his fate. Indeed, both times the man has an accident, London states "it happened," as if "it" were an inevitability of nature and that the man had played no role in "it." The most important feature of this deterministic philosophy is...

    Causality, Determinism, Free will 1360  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack Kevorkian or Jack the Ripper

    Jack Kevorkian or Jack the Ripper? The ending of one’s life, terminally ill or not, should not be done purposely by another man’s hands. If such procedures were considered acceptable, every ill person with no will to continue living would try to find ailments that deem assisted suicide. Jack Kevorkian, also known as “Dr. Death,” was a lifelong activist for physician-assisted suicide. Kevorkian was said to have assisted in 130 suicides of terminally ill patients during his life and is looked...

    Death, Euthanasia device, Jack Kevorkian 1776  Words | 5  Pages

  • The Importance of Setting in Jack Londons "To Build a Fire" and Kate Chopins "The Storm"

    into the story. In "To Build a Fire" by Jack London, the setting plays a significant role throughout the entire short story.  London uses certain techniques to establish the atmosphere of the story.  By introducing his readers to the setting, prepares them for a tone that is depressed and frightening.  Isolated by the hostile environment of the Yukon in sub-freeing temperatures, a man falls victim to the unrelenting and unforgiving power of nature, London shows us how the main character of the story...

    Fiction, Jack London, Journey 1471  Words | 4  Pages

  • A Analysis of Jack London Novels

    A literary Analysis of Jack London three most recognized works, Sea Wolf; The Call of the Wild; and White Fang. Jack London lived a full life, even though he died at the young age of forty. In his life time he experienced many things, and I believe that these experiences were the catalyst of his novels. Jack London was an oyster pirate, a government patrolman in San Francisco Bay, a sailor and an agrarian reformer, a seal hunter in the North Pacific and a gold prospector in the frozen...

    Dog, Jack London, Klondike Gold Rush 2925  Words | 8  Pages

  • The Wicked Ways of the Wicked Witch

    The Wicked Ways of the White Witch: How Evil is Evident in Jadis, the “Queen” of Narnia It was once said that “evil enters like a needle and spreads like an oak tree” (“Ethiopian”). In C. S. Lewis’ The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, evil enters the fictitious world of Narnia and quickly diffuses throughout the land. This evil permeates every aspect of its society and has its inhabitants living in fear of the source: Jadis, “Queen” of Narnia, better known as the White Witch. She is...

    Cair Paravel, Charn, Digory Kirke 1658  Words | 4  Pages

  • The Crucial Role of Captain Jack Elliot

    Name Professor AP English III 28 February 2014 The Crucial Role of Captain Jack Elliot: A Literary Criticism of These is my Words Nancy E. Turner, in her American novel inspired by her own family’s experiences These is my Words: The Diary of Sarah Agnes Prine (1998), displays the struggles of life on the frontier from a female’s point of view. Sarah Prine, Turner’s grandmother, is the main character who is traveling across Arizona with her family to find a place to settle. Along the way, Sarah...

    Ambiguity, American male singers, Character 966  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London Analysis

    he had saved himself. Those old-timers were rather womanish, some of them, he thought” (London 488). This quote, from “To Build a Fire” by Jack London, allows the reader some insight as to what the attitude of the character is and how London portrays him as an arrogant, ignorant man. The story takes place in the Yukon Territory and supports the theme of man vs. nature, which is developed specifically by London through his characters. In the story, a traveler who is new to the territory foolishly tries...

    Demonstration, Dog, Instinct 782  Words | 2  Pages

  • Papa Jack

    Papa Jack For a book that is a must read in class, Papa Jack: Jack Johnson and the Era of White Hopes is a book that really is a must read. I remember hearing the term about giving someone a Jack Johnson, but I never knew where the term came from. For example, they use this saying in Anchorman and now that I know who the saying is about, I find it to be even funnier. Anyway, if you are someone who likes sports or history of sports, then you should read Jack: Jack Johnson and the Era of White Hopes...

    African American, Black people, Jack Johnson 1786  Words | 7  Pages

  • To Build a Fire by Jack London

    To Build a Fire Journal Entry The old timer in the story of, “To Build a Fire” by Jack London, plays a significant role throughout The man’s journey through the Yukon Trail. His part also has a truly symbolic meaning that is evident whenever The man refers to him. While looking at the story from a Darwinian perspective, The old timer is a successful breed of humans because of his wise decisions and intelligence. He shared his thoughts to The man about the traveling conditions that day and offered...

    Human, Klondike Gold Rush, Natural environment 542  Words | 2  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

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    East End of London, Jack the Ripper, Murder 1221  Words | 3  Pages

  • Explore the ways in which Susan Hill presents the woman in black

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  • Jack the Ripper

    Jack the Ripper – Controlled assessment Alan Milne ‘The police investigative methods were to blame for not capturing Jack the Ripper’. To what extent do you agree with this statement? I think that policing methods were to blame for jack the ripper not being caught because they were heavily influenced by the public, media and press this shows us that they were scared and intimidated by them and had to control them as riots may of broke out. Although I think they were to blame, people could argue...

    Jack the Ripper, Jack the Ripper fiction, Police 983  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    The Whitechapel Murders and those of Jack the Ripper are not generally one and the same. Over a period of three years towards the end of the nineteenth century a number of prostitutes were murdered under different circumstances – the murder of prostitutes was not an especially unique occurrence during those times but several of the murders drew particular attention on account of the savagery with which the victim's bodies were mutilated. Within the Whitechapel Murders was a cluster of murders that...

    Central News Agency, Jack the Ripper, Jack the Ripper fiction 781  Words | 3  Pages

  • London Cosmopolitan

    London is one of the most glamorous cities in the world leading in architecture and finance. It has become a vibrant cosmopolitan metropolis. A city that is a financial hub for business and a global tourist attraction holds urban spectacles that are “multi-dimensional” (Gotham 226). Cities of this sort also evoke characteristics that connect with the concept of ‘movement and vision’. With the entire activity taking place within London, it has to be a city of rhythm, harmony, and melody. All three...

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  • JACK THE RIPPER ESSAY

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