T&D - Walmart

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Training and Development
Training and development isn’t a one-time event at Walmart and Sam’s Club. It’s an integral and ongoing part of an associate’s life. Each associate begins with an in-depth personal orientation. This is how we introduce you to our history and culture and paint a picture of the roles and responsibilities you’ll take on when you join the operations of the world’s largest retailer. After orientation, each division has its own specific and detailed Training and Development programs that give you the knowledge and tools to succeed in our company, chart your own career path and accomplish your most ambitious goals. These are just some of the ways we’re Making Better Possible with opportunities that matter to you most. MANAGER TRAINING

We offer many training opportunities to help managers sharpen their leadership skills, advance through the company and keep their teams’ morale and passion for fulfilling our mission running strong. Here are just a few opportunities:

* Assistant Management Training (AMT) is a management-training program open to all salaried Walmart Stores U.S. field associates. You must apply and be selected to take advantage of this program. * The Walton Institute provides an educational environment for Walmart leaders from around the world to stretch themselves and explore our unique company culture and how to foster that culture. * The 12-week Manager in Training (MIT) program at Sam’s Club is designed to expose trainees to the various operations within, allowing them to rotate through the company. Upon completion, trainees may apply for an Assistant Manager position.

“THE WAL-MART WAY”...Cultural Kool-Aid Creates Cult-Like Commitment| |

Michael Bergdahl|
|

I remember when I joined Wal-Mart I went through a full week of cultural indoctrination. It was full immersion cultural training for seven straight days to teach me "The Wal-Mart Way" of doing things! 

Sam Walton created a unique culture at Wal-Mart, and by investing in cultural indoctrination of all of his managers he turned Wal-Mart's Culture into a powerful sustainable competitive advantage. The ideas and concepts behind "The Wal-Mart Way" of doing things are easy for competitors to understand but brutally difficult for others to copy and successfully replicate in their businesses. 

Some say the Wal-Mart Culture is "cult-like" and they say that because everyone who works there is required to do things "The Wal-Mart Way", or they are encouraged to leave. Sam Walton demanded that everyone buy into Wal-Mart's unique culture, as do today's leaders. The employees and the managers are expected to drink Wal-Mart's distinct "Cultural Kool-Aid" and embrace the culture . . . or leave! 

I believe it is the company’s culture that has been the driving force behind Wal-Mart’s phenomenal growth from a single store 48 years ago to more than 8300 stores today. So how was this accomplished? Wal-Mart built Its unique culture by communicating a clear set of cultural standards and company values. This is not a perfect science but here are just some of the reasons that capture many of Wal-Mart's Cultural Standards & Values that form the foundation of "The Wal-Mart Way" and create the cult-like commitment of its managers and employees: 

EMPLOYEES ARE BUSINESS PARTNERS –

Many years ago Wal-Mart’s founder, Sam Walton, figured out the value of creating a true employee partnership. He knew that under the right circumstances every employee has the capacity to be a business leader. For this reason he pushed decision-making downward by empowering all of his employees to act like business owners. Sam Walton referred to his “employees” as “associates” so they would act like entrepreneurs, and take ownership of the business. To really capture that feeling that owners feel, Wal-Mart offers profit-sharing to all of Its employee associate partners. At Wal-Mart profit-sharing is not a something for nothing proposition....
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