J.K. Rowling Criticism

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  • Topic: Harry Potter, J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
  • Pages : 3 (965 words )
  • Download(s) : 2342
  • Published : May 6, 2008
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J.K. Rowling: Critiqued and Beloved
Success is a two-headed dragon, with great success also comes great criticism. To be successful, a person should be able to take one with another, take the criticism in stride and use it. J.K. Rowling, the world renowned author of the Harry Potter series, does just that with criticism like “…written for people whose imaginative lives are confined to TV cartoons,” (Byatt) and also being called “derivative and clichéd” (Del Negro). Not only does she not let the criticism she has received affect her, but she uses it as leverage to become an even greater writer.(Wilson) For every bad thing that was said about Rowling and her writing, there were good things being said by the tenfold, “…quite likely the books will become popular classics.” and “…engagingly written; they are well-paced; they make enjoyable a read-aloud, either at home or in the classroom.” (Del Negro). Not only was Rowling criticized for being “derivative and clichéd” (Del Negro) but she has people, mainly Christians, saying that “…if children read these materials, they are going to become believers in the religion of Wicca, the religion of witchcraft," said Judith Krug” (Delfiner) and this quote by Michael Duff gives further evidence of the criticism Rowling has dealt with from religious criticizers: I have a strange affection for Harry Potter, because he is hated, equally, by the extreme right and the extreme left. A figure who can annoy both these groups must be doing something right. Opponents of Harry Potter break down into three main categories: the religious right, who are threatened by competing visions of the supernatural, the extreme left, who are threatened by old-fashioned notions of good and evil, and by cynical hipsters, who hate anything that becomes popular. Christians have always been hostile to people who use their imagination, as if reading about magic and supernatural creatures is a kind of "gateway drug" that will get kids into Satanism....
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