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Jordan Stone
IB Math SL
Mrs. Wicks

G-Force Math Portfolio

This portfolio will investigate how to create an equation that has a line of best fit for a given set of data. The points given will be plotted to see if there is a recognizable regression formed. In order to find the right regression equation, different regression equations will be tested with the data points provided. The process of finding the right equation and the testing of points will be provided. Each set of points and equations formed will include a graph. Once the best equation is formed it shall be tested to see if it fits the next set of data points. Once plotted, comments shall be made.

Horizontal G-Force:
Here is a table of horizontal G-force tolerance in humans. “+Gx” represents the horizontal acceleration, which means +Gx of 11 means that at 1 minute, humans can tolerate a horizontal acceleration of 11. + Gx (g) (x)| Time (min) (y)|

35| 0.01|
28| 0.03|
20| .1|
15| .3|
11| 1|
9| 3|
6| 10|
4.5| 30|

The data is arranged from highest force/lowest time, to lowest force/highest time. By looking at the chart, humans can withstand a lower G-force for longer periods of time. As time increases, the G-Force (or horizontal acceleration) decreases, and vice versa. These points were plotted on a graph where acceleration is the x axis, and time is the y axis. There are only 8 points represented which may not be an accurate regression. Since the values are not spaced out in even intervals, so the graph cannot be linear.

The data seems to create an asymptote when the force reaches 35. It makes sense that humans tolerate a lower force for a longer time, and a higher force for a shorter period of time. It can be assumed that as the force or +Gx increases, time will decrease. This graph looks similar to an exponential graph, so a function will be created to see if an exponential function most accurately fits this graph.

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