E-Waste

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E-Waste Management in India: Issues and Options
Symbiosis International University
Symbiosis Law School, Pune

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Nikansha Shivnani; Naresh Gupta

ABSTRACT
“E-waste,” a term for discarded electronic products near the end or at the end of their useful life, contains hazardous materials like mercury, arsenic, and cadmium among other toxic substances. Although e-waste is the largest growing segment of the municipal waste stream in developing countries, domestic and international laws – and the enforcement of those laws – have not caught up. The current practices of e-waste management in India suffer from a number of drawbacks like the difficulty in inventorisation, unhealthy conditions of informal recycling, inadequate legislation, poor awareness and reluctance on part of the corporate to address the critical issues. The consequences are that, toxic materials enter the waste stream with no special precautions to avoid the known adverse effects on the environment and human health and resources are wasted when economically valuable materials are dumped or unhealthy conditions are developed during the informal recycling. These dangerous dismantling practices present immense environmental and human health implications. However, with international cooperation and the right economic incentives, the tide of this toxic trade can be stemmed.

The paper highlights the associated issues and strategies to address this emerging problem, in the light of initiatives in India. The paper presents a waste management system with shared responsibility for the collection and recycling of electronic wastes amongst the manufacturers/ assemblers, importers, recyclers, regulatory bodies and the consumers. Key Words: E-waste, precautions, recycling, toxic materials, management, regulation, electronics, gadget.

CONTENTS
1.1INTRODUCTION4
2.1 REVIEW OF LITERATURE6
2.1.1. SCENARIO IN INDIA6
2.1.2. IMPACT OF ELECTRONIC WASTE ON HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENT7
2.1.3. OVERVIEW OF LAWS REGULATING E-WASTE9
3.1RESEARCH METHODOLOGY10
3.1.2 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY10
3.1.3 RESEARCH METHOD10
4.1.1FINDINGS AND DISCUSSION12
4.1.1.1 PIE CHARTS AND FINDINGS12
4.1.1.2DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION13
5.1CONCLUSION14
6.1 RECOMMENDATIONS15
6.1.1.WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES15
6.1.2. E-WASTE POLICY AND REGULATION15
6.1.3. EXTENDED PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY17
6.1.4. E-WASTE RECYCLING18
6.1.5. CAPACITY BUILDING, TRAINING AND AWARENESS PROGRAMMES19
7.1LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE SCOPE19
7.1.1 LIMITATIONS19
7.1.1.1CUMBERSOME AUTHORISATIONS:19
7.1.1.2TARGETS:20
7.1.1.3LEAKAGES BACK TO THE INFORMAL SECTOR:20
7.1.1.4REGULATION AND MONITORING:20
7.1.1.5OTHER ISSUES:20
7.1.1.6A FINAL CHALLENGE:21
7.1.2 FUTURE SCOPE22
7.1.2.1 UPSTREAM INNOVATION AND SOLUTIONS:22
7.1.2.2 DOWNSTREAM SOLUTIONS:22
7.1.2.3 REVERSE SUPPLY CHAIN:23
7.1.2.4 RECYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE:23
7.1.2.5 RESOURCE RECOVERY:24
7.1.2.6 REFURBISHMENT AND REUSE:24
7.1.2.7 LEGAL FRAMEWORK:25
BIBLOGRAPHY....................................................................................................................28

1.1 INTRODUCTION

Did you purchase that ultra-thin laptop with endless hard-drive space and a battery that never dies? How about that stylish and sleek new mobile phone that browses the web, shoots video and plays all your favourite music? Congratulations, you have the latest electronics!!

However, have you ever wondered where your old laptop, iPod or mobile phone ended up after disposal? There is a good chance it ended up burned and dismantled by young workers in various hubs who have to inhale the poisonous fumes every day. Electronic waste or “E-waste,” a term for discarded electronic products near the end or at the end of their useful life, contains hazardous materials like mercury,...
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