A&P I Case Study Analysis

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  • Topic: Muscular system, Rotator cuff, Biceps brachii muscle
  • Pages : 2 (637 words )
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  • Published : February 10, 2012
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Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 201

Case Study

Issue #1: Blister
1. The layers which separate when a blister forms are the epidermal and dermal layers. 2. Here are the differences between the following fluid-filled lesions: --pustule: common with acne; a small, inflamed, blister-like lesion filled with pus; may be sign of a bacterial infection --vesicle: a small sac or cyst containing fluid or gas

--blister: a small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin, usually caused by forceful rubbing (friction), minor injuries, pressure or sunburn --bulla: a blister that is more than 5mm (3/16 in.) in diameter with thin walls that is filled with fluid 3. I would say that this blister seems closest to a second-degree burn. 4. To help Frank’s blister heal and prevent further outbreaks of athlete’s foot, he should make the infected area less suitable for the fungus to grow, by keeping the area clean and dry. He should also continue taking his medication until it is finished. He should also avoid walking barefoot, use socks in airport security lines, and use antifungal foot powder periodically.

Issue #2: Shoulder injury
1. Torin’s diagnosis (without being able to see the x-ray, as it was not on the case study information sheet) seems to be a dislocated shoulder joint. 2. The shoulder joint is most reinforced by tendons, especially the long head of the biceps brachii and the four tendons/associated muscles that make up the rotator cuff: subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor. 3. It is extremely helpful to use the numerical scale for quantifying pain severity for a patient in order to best asses a pain’s origin and severity, thus allowing for the most accurate diagnosis and pain treatment. 4. The term “putting a joint back into place” indicates moving the bone back into the synovial joint (its proper place). The “pop” sound occurs due to gas bubbles...
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