A Third Life Critique

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Creighton Smith
ACP 131 Critique
2/21/13
Word Count: 572

“A Third Life” by Paul Martin discusses the consequences people face if they do not sleep enough over long periods of time. Due to the constraints of modern living, society views sleep as unproductive. Sleeping rhythms are disrupted by the needs of our busy lifestyles and we sacrifice sleep in favor of other activities. Because we chose to sleep less, sleep deprivation has a negative effect on our lives. Tiredness is one of the frequent causes of accidents, but doctors still pay little to sleep disorders. Sleep is vital to humans as well as animals and without the proper amount of sleep each night, negative effects such as mental and physical health are more likely to occur.

Sleep is not only a human trait; it is also a universal characteristic of all animals from insects to mammals. Sleep can be specified on different levels due to the presence of electrical activity in the brain, immobility, a specific sleeping place, and a well-established rhythm. Sleep is essential to the point that some animals have evolved ways to overcome obstacles in order to sleep. For example, the dolphin is capable of unihemispheric sleep, which allows one half of the brain to remain awake to control the dolphin’s breathing while the other half of the brain is asleep. Sleep is significant to all aspects of living.

The information that Martin provides seems accurate simply from personal experience and the fact that he has a PhD in behavioral biology from Cambridge University. In addition, the author references many other outside sources throughout the passage. Because sleep is essential and part of our everyday lives, this passage is significant and relevant to everyone. Martin elaborates and uses examples for his points, which creates a strong, valid passage. For example, Martin uses the dolphin as an example to help the reader understand the concept of unihemispheric sleep.

For the most part, I agree...
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