A Tell-Tale Heart Annotated Bibliography

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Christen Salley
Jonathan Purkiss
English Composition II
24 October 2011
Annotated Bibliography
Ki, Magdalen Wing-chi. "Ego-Evil and 'The Tell-Tale Heart'." Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature 61.1 (2008): 25+. Literature Resource Center. Web. 24 Oct. 2011. This article discusses the comparison of the eye in Edgar Allen Poe’s “A Tell-Tale Heart,” and how it relates to ego. Another comparison is also made to his similar short story “The Black Cat.” The writer states, “In "The Black Cat" the narrator arbitrarily sees that the black cat is bad and kills it, but the police's questioning eye agitates and excites the narrator. The narrator feels compelled to reveal the truth, though he blames the cat rather than himself for his misconduct.”(2008) The author of the article goes on to discuss into depth into the evil that eye possesses, and makes the reader aware that most of Poe’s stories follow a similar format. Ward, Alfred C. "Edgar Allan Poe: 'Tales of Mystery and Imagination'." Aspects of the Modern Short Story: English and American. University of London Press, 1924. 32-44. Rpt. in Short Stories for Students. Ed. Kathleen Wilson and Marie Lazzari. Vol. 4. Detroit: Gale, 1998. Literature Resource Center. Web. 24 Oct. 2011. This article focuses more on the narrator of the story rather than the eye, but the eye is still mentioned. It also brings up the question of Poe’s temperament during the time he wrote the story stating, “Second, that literary men in general, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, were still in the trough of the wave of German romanticism, which exalted extravagant and clamorous and stormy sentimentality above the quieter, deeper, truer moods of human feeling.” (1998) More further research into this matter can help explain why so much of Poe’s work was dark.
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